South Sudan, Republic of

South Sudan, Republic of

Country Name

Republic Of South Sudan

Official Country Name

Juba South Sudan

Assessment Details

From

10th/Aug/2023

To

31st/Dec/2023

Name of Assessor

Lemi Angelo John, Mahlet Sisay,

Title and Position

Logistics Associate, Logistics Officer

Contact

Lemi.john@wfp.org/mahlet.sisay@wfp.org

Table of Contents

Chapter Name of Assessor Organization Date updated 

1 South Sudan Country Profile

Lemi Angelo John, Mahlet Sisay WFP Dec-23
1.1 South Sudan Humanitarian Background Lemi Angelo John, Mahlet Sisay WFP Dec-23
1.2 South Sudan Regulatory Departments and Quality Control Lemi Angelo John, Mahlet Sisay WFP Dec-23
1.3 South Sudan Customs Information Lemi Angelo John, Mahlet Sisay WFP Dec-23

2 South Sudan Logistics Infrastructure

Lemi Angelo John, Mahlet Sisay WFP Dec-23
2.1 South Sudan Juba Port Assessment Lemi Angelo John, Mahlet Sisay WFP Dec-23
2.1.1 South Sudan Port of Total/Malualgurubar Lemi Angelo John, Mahlet Sisay WFP Dec-23
2.2 South Sudan Aviation Lemi Angelo John, Mahlet Sisay WFP Dec-23
2.2.1 South Sudan Juba International Airport Lemi Angelo John, Mahlet Sisay WFP Dec-23
2.2.2 South Sudan Malakal National Airport Lemi Angelo John, Mahlet Sisay WFP Dec-23
2.2.3 South Sudan Wau National Airport Lemi Angelo John, Mahlet Sisay WFP Dec-23
2.2.4 South Sudan Rumbek National Airport Lemi Angelo John, Mahlet Sisay WFP Dec-23
2.3 South Sudan Road Network Lemi Angelo John, Mahlet Sisay WFP Dec-23
2.4 South Sudan Railway Assessment Lemi Angelo John, Mahlet Sisay WFP Dec-23
2.5 South Sudan Waterways Assessment Lemi Angelo John, Mahlet Sisay WFP Dec-23
2.6 South Sudan Storage Assessment Lemi Angelo John, Mahlet Sisay WFP Dec-23
2.7 South Sudan Milling Assessment Lemi Angelo John, Mahlet Sisay WFP Dec-23

3 South Sudan Logistics Services

Lemi Angelo John, Mahlet Sisay WFP Dec-23
3.1 South Sudan Fuel Lemi Angelo John, Mahlet Sisay WFP Dec-23
3.2 South Sudan Transporters Lemi Angelo John, Mahlet Sisay WFP Dec-23
3.3 South Sudan Manual Labor Costs Lemi Angelo John, Mahlet Sisay WFP Dec-23
3.4 South Sudan Telecommunications Lemi Angelo John, Mahlet Sisay WFP Dec-23
3.5 South Sudan Food and Additional Suppliers Maureen Gitau, Fiona Lithgow WFP Aug-15
3.6 South Sudan Additional Service Providers Maureen Gitau, Fiona Lithgow WFP Aug-15
3.7 South Sudan Waste Management Infrastructure Assessment  Lemi Angelo John, Mahlet Sisay WFP Dec-23

4 South Sudan Contacts

Lemi Angelo John, Mahlet Sisay WFP Dec-23
4.1 South Sudan Government Contact List Lemi Angelo John, Mahlet Sisay WFP Dec-23
4.2 South Sudan Humanitarian Agency Contact List Lemi Angelo John, Mahlet Sisay WFP Dec-23
4.4 South Sudan Ports & Waterways Companies Contact List Lemi Angelo John, Mahlet Sisay WFP Dec-23
4.6 South Sudan Storage & Milling Companies Contact List Lemi Angelo John, Mahlet Sisay WFP Dec-23
4.7 South Sudan Fuel Providers Contact List Lemi Angelo John, Mahlet Sisay WFP Dec-23
4.8 South Sudan Transporter Contact List Lemi Angelo John, Mahlet Sisay WFP Dec-23
4.11 South Sudan Additional Services Contact List Lemi Angelo John, Mahlet Sisay WFP Dec-23
4.12 South Sudan Waste Management Companies Contact List Lemi Angelo John, Mahlet Sisay WFP Dec-23

5 South Sudan Annexes

Maureen Gitau, Fiona Lithgow WFP Aug-15
5.1 South Sudan Acronyms and Abbreviations Maureen Gitau, Fiona Lithgow WFP Aug-15

South Sudan, Republic of - 1 Country Profile

South Sudan Country Map

Generic Information

South Sudan, officially the Republic of South Sudan, is a landlocked country in East-Central Africa that is part of the United Nations Sub-Region of East Africa. Juba is the capital and largest city.

South Sudan gained independence from Sudan on 9 July 2011, making it the most recent sovereign state or country with widespread recognition as of 2023. It includes the vast swamp region of the Sudd, formed by the White Nile and known locally as the Bahr al Jabal, meaning "Mountain Sea".

Generic country information can be located from sources which are regularly maintained and reflect current facts and figures. For a generic country overview, please consult the following sources:

Wikipedia information on South Sudan (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/South_Sudan)

IMF Country Information on South Sudan (https://www.imf.org/en/Countries/SSD)

Humanitarian Info

World Food Programme Information on South Sudan (https://www.wfp.org/countries/south-sudan)

UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs Information on South Sudan (https://www.unocha.org/south-sudan)

Facts and Figures

South Sudan Wolfram Alpha Information (https://www.wolframalpha.com/input/?i=South+Sudan)

South Sudan World Bank Information (https://www.worldbank.org/en/country/southsudan)

South Sudan Population Information (https://worldpopulationreview.com/countries/south-sudan-population)

 

 

 

 

South Sudan, Republic of - 1.1 Humanitarian Background

Disasters, Conflicts and Migration

Natural Disasters

Type

Occurs

Comments / Details

Drought

Yes

While accessibility throughout the country is marginally improved during the dry season, conflict over scarce resources in areas affected by drought can lead to insecurity and inter-communal conflict. Compounding this is the road and river infrastructure, which is poorly maintained without any long-term maintenance program, which is deteriorating yearly. Eastern Equatoria and parts of Jonglei are frequently affected by drought. Most conflict incidents occur during the dry season, with Jonglei, Unity, Lakes, Upper Nile, and Warrap states recording the largest number of incidents.

Earthquakes

No

Earthquakes rarely occur in South Sudan.

Epidemics

No

Poor sanitation and water contamination have led to outbreaks of cholera. For information on other major infectious diseases, please see the following link: https://www.indexmundi.com/south_sudan/major_infectious_diseases.html

Extreme Temperatures

No

South Sudan can be hot, but extreme temperatures are rare; the average annual temperature is about 28.5° C, with an average annual high of 33.7° C.

Flooding

Yes

For information on flooding in South Sudan, please see the following link: https://floodlist.com/tag/south-sudan

Insect Infestation

No

Locusts, termites, stem-borer, and Dura-bugs can have an effect on crop production; however, the prevalence of such pests has been low.

Mudslides

No

South Sudan has mainly flat terrain, characterized by rocky outcrops. Landslides are rare.

Volcanic Eruptions

No

South Sudan has no active volcanoes.

High Waves / Surges

No

South Sudan is completely land locked and there are no large bodies of water where high waves or sudden water surges could be a problem.

Wildfires

No

Large areas of grassy plains, savannah and lowland forests characterize South Sudan.  Wildfires often occur because of agricultural burning and are common in areas experiencing consistent drought.

High Winds

No

High winds can occur and have damaged warehouse facilities in the past; however, they are not considered a constant hazard.

Other Comments

N/A

Man-Made Issues

Civil Strife

Yes

Since December 2013, South Sudan and its armed forces have been involved in non-international armed conflicts with several armed non-state actors, notably the Sudan People's Liberation Movement/Army-in-Opposition (SPLM/A-IO) and the National Salvation Front (NAS)

International Conflict

No

There are no international conflicts between South Sudan and neighbouring countries.

Internally Displaced Persons

Yes

For information on IDPs in South Sudan, please see the following link: https://www.unhcr.org/us/countries/south-sudan

Refugees Present

Yes

For information on refugees in South Sudan, please see the following link: https://www.unhcr.org/us/countries/south-sudan

Landmines / UXO Present

Yes

Parts of the country are still affected by landmines and UXO’s. Jonglei and Western, Central and Eastern Equatoria states have the highest number of known hazards. A few roads in Western and Northern Bahr El Ghazal, Unity, Jonglei and Lakes states are still minded (UNMAS 2023). For more information, see the following link: https://www.unmas.org/en/programmes/southsudan

Other Comments

N/A

 

For a more detailed database on disasters by country, please see the Centre for Research on Epidemiology of Disasters Country Profile.

 

Seasonal Effects on Logistics Capacities

Seasonal Effects on Transport

Transport Type

Time Frame

Comments / Details

Primary Road Transport

Rainy season: May to October

Dry season: January to May

 

The total estimated track length in South Sudan is approximately 90,200 km (about 56047.68 mi). This includes approximately 14,000 km (about 8699.2 mi) of primary and secondary roads and 6,000 km (about 3728.23 mi) of tertiary tracks. Approximately 5,000 km (about 3106.86 mi) of roads remain passable during the rainy season.

Road transport is severely affected during the rainy season, with some parts being completely inaccessible for months.  Pre-positioning of supplies by road takes place during the dry season.

Secondary Road Transport

Rainy season: May to October

Dry season: January to May

The secondary road network is severely affected during the rainy season roads. Many primary and secondary roads receive little to no maintenance and during the wet season, vehicle traffic quickly destroys submerged and waterlogged roads.

Rail Transport

 

South Sudan has one rail connection, connecting Babanusa (Sudan) with Wau (444 km). This line comprises 248 km of narrow gauge, single-track rail within South Sudan. Rail transport is currently not operational.

Air Transport

Rainy season: May to October

Air transport in South Sudan is weather dependent. Helicopter and small aircraft operations are grounded in bad weather. Landing strips are mostly gravel, making large numbers of airstrips unusable by fixed wing planes during the rainy season necessitating the need to revert to helicopters. At smaller airstrips, the proximity of local villages and lack of security makes incursions of people and animals onto airstrips a hazard to aircraft and crew.

Waterway Transport

All year on the river Nile.

South Sudan controls the upper reaches of the Nile, which gives the country 1,400 km of navigable inland waterways. These main waterways remain navigable throughout the year. However, the barges and pushers have had little investment over the past years and are constantly breaking down, making the barge operations unreliable.

 

South Sudan has an equatorial climate with high humidity and lots of rainfall. The temperature varies between an average low of 21° C and an average high of 34° C. The country experiences only two seasons. The rainy season varies between May and October, and the dry season varies between January and May. On average, the hottest month is March, and the coolest month is July, with the driest average month being January and the wettest month being August.

During the rainy season, road transport is severely affected as roads become flooded and waterlogged, with large parts of the country becoming inaccessible. The planting and harvest season coincides with the start of the rainy season and the beginning of the dry season. In general, agricultural production during this period does not impact the availability of trucks; however, in smaller locations where there is a general lack of services and service providers, seasonal agricultural practices can affect availability. Pre-positioning of supplies and cargo takes place during the dry season.

Seasonal Effects on Storage and Handling

Activity Type

Time Frame

Comments / Details

Storage

Rainy season: May to October

Dry season: January to May

Seasonal flooding and insecurity remain the biggest factors affecting storage facilities. Storage facilities in certain areas are at elevated risk of flooding or of being cut-off because of roads being inaccessible. Storage facilities are at risk of being abandoned and/or looted due to insecurity in some areas, especially in those areas experiencing conflict.

Handling

June to February

January to August

Agricultural practices (food production and livestock) are the main livelihood activities and sources of income for most households in non-urban areas. Seasonal planting, harvesting and migratory patterns can result in a reduction of available labour. 

Insecurity due to historical inter-tribal conflict, armed insurgencies and cattle raiding in areas such as Jonglei and Unity states can result in the large displacement of people and the unavailability of permanent labour.

Other

Rainy season: May to October

In some instances, transporters may refuse to go into areas affected by conflict. During the rainy season, road transporters may refuse to go into certain areas due to an increased risk of accidents or of getting stuck. Local transporters operate without support, and trucks can get stuck for weeks in areas affected by heavy rains.

 

Physical access constraints because of perennial flooding, poor road conditions and insecurity remain the biggest factors influencing logistics operations in South Sudan. During the rainy season, 60% of the road network becomes inaccessible. 50% of all counties in 2012 experienced flooding, making moving heavy vehicles difficult. Historically, during the dry season, there is an increase in inter-communal violence and a decrease in the general security situation in certain parts, such as Jonglei. As a result, pre-positioning of stock must be a top priority for any organization during the dry season when the roads remain dry, river levels stable and counties are unaffected by perennial flooding.

Capacity and Contacts for In-Country Emergency Response

 

GOVERNMENT

The Ministry of Humanitarian Affairs and Disaster Management is mandated to oversee all humanitarian work in South Sudan. In general, the use of military/defense assets in relief operations occurs rarely and, in most occurrences, such assets are utilised on a one time only basis and usually without humanitarian involvement. Close cooperation with military establishments involves the facilitation of access to affected areas in restricted areas.

For more information on government contact details, please see the following link: 4.1 Government Contact List.

 

HUMANITARIAN COMMUNITY

The current humanitarian structure in South Sudan involves several key agencies and organizations that are actively engaged in addressing the humanitarian needs of the population. These agencies work in collaboration to aid and support across various sectors.

The United Nations Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA) plays a vital role in coordinating humanitarian efforts in South Sudan. OCHA works closely with other UN agencies, NGOs, and government entities to ensure effective coordination, information sharing, and resource allocation. They provide regular updates and reports on the humanitarian situation in the country, guiding the overall response efforts.

The United Nations World Food Programme (WFP) is one of the major agencies operating in South Sudan. WFP focuses on addressing food insecurity and malnutrition by providing food assistance to vulnerable populations. Their ongoing programs include general food distribution, nutrition support, and school feeding programs, which aim to improve the nutritional status of communities across the country.

The United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF) is actively involved in South Sudan, working to protect and promote the rights of children. UNICEF's programs in the country focus on providing access to safe water, sanitation facilities, health services, and education. They also prioritize child protection initiatives, including family tracing and reunification for separated children, and psychosocial support interventions.

Other key agencies and organizations operating in South Sudan include the International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC), Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF), and the South Sudan Red Cross Society (SSRCS). ICRC provides healthcare services, supports medical facilities, and promotes respect for international humanitarian law. MSF delivers medical assistance, emergency response, and long-term healthcare interventions. The SSRCS plays a vital role in responding to emergencies, providing relief items, and promoting community resilience.

These ongoing programs and initiatives are crucial in addressing the urgent needs of the population in South Sudan, particularly in the areas of food security, healthcare, water and sanitation, education, and protection. The collaborative efforts of these key agencies and organizations are instrumental in mitigating the impact of the ongoing humanitarian crisis in the country.

Source: 

- United Nations Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA): https://www.unocha.org/south-sudan

- United Nations World Food Programme (WFP): https://www.wfp.org/countries/south-sudan

- United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF): https://www.unicef.org/southsudan/

- International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC): https://www.icrc.org/en/where-we-work/africa/south-sudan

- Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF): https://www.msf.org/south-sudan

- South Sudan Red Cross Society (SSRCS): https://www.ifrc.org/en/what-we-do/where-we-work/africa/south-sudan-red-cross-society/

For more information on humanitarian agency contact details, please see the following link: 4.2 Humanitarian Agency Contact List.

 

 

South Sudan, Republic of - 1.2 Regulatory Departments and Quality Control

South Sudan National Bureau of Standards is responsible for the country’s national infrastructure in terms of standardization, metrology, and accreditation. However, the accreditation body has not been activated. The other stakeholders of the NQI system include various government ministries such as ministries of: Health, Environment and forestry, Livestock and Fisheries, Agriculture and Food Security, Trade and Industry, Transport, Roads and Bridges, Land, Housing and Urban Development, Information and Communication, Energy and Dams and agencies/parastatal bodies such as Drug and Food Control Authority (DFCA), National Communication Authority (NCA), South Sudan Roads Authority (SSRA), South Sudan Urban Water Corporation (SSUWC), South Sudan Electricity Corporation (SSEC) and South Sudan Civil Aviation Authority (CAA).

Responsibility for technical regulation and product certification currently falls under the purview of the SSNBS. SSNBS is responsible for ensuring fairness of trade and the protection of consumers against substandard, shoddy, and hazardous products. SSNBS support for trade includes the development and implementation of standards for various sectors mainly through product conformity assessment (testing, inspections, and certification). Conformity assessment is undertaken by different government agencies. For instance, the inspection of medicines and other regulated products is conducted by the DFCA while NCA conducts the inspection of electronic products, especially telecommunication products.

For more information on the department see the following links:

 

For more information on regulatory departments and quality control laboratories’ contact details, please see the following links: 4.1 Government Contact List

 

 

 

South Sudan, Republic of - 1.3 Customs Information

Duties and Tax Exemption

Emergency Response:

[Note: This section contains information which is related and applicable to ‘crisis’ times. These instruments can be applied when an emergency is officially declared by the Government.  When this occurs, there is usually a streamlined process to import goods duty and tax-free.]

In the following table, state which of the following agreements and conventions apply to the country and if there are any other existing ones

Agreements / Conventions Description

Ratified by the Country?

(Yes / No)

WCO (World Customs Organization) member

Yes, ratified 18 July 2012

Annex J-5 Revised Kyoto Convention

No 

OCHA Model Agreement

No 

Tampere Convention (on the Provision of Telecommunication Resources for Disaster Mitigation and Relief Operations)

No

Regional Agreements (on emergency/disaster response, but also customs unions, regional integration)

N/A

Exemption Regular Regime (Non-Emergency Response): 

[Note: This section should contain information on the usual duties & taxes exemption regime during non-emergency times when there is no declared state of emergency and no streamlined process (e.g. regular importations/development/etc.).]

The South Sudan Customs Services exemptions unit handles tax exemptions. UN agencies and NGOs are exempt from import duty, excise duty, vehicles, customs warehouse rent (CWR) and VAT; however, specific exemption procedures must be adhered to by UN agencies or organisations.

Apart from UNMISS and UN agencies, tax exemptions can only be granted to registered taxpayers, and organisations must register for a Tax Identification Number (TIN) at a Directorate of Taxation branch office.  A special tax exemption can be granted to non-UN/NGO organisations, but such exemptions are granted on a case basis and only under certain circumstances.

To be granted a tax exemption on imports, organisations must apply for an exemption at the South Sudan Customs Service unit within the Ministry of Finance and Economic Planning (MoFEP) and submit the required documentation related to the cargo. Only the minister of MoFEP can grant tax exemptions.

Once fully processed, an exemption letter will be issued by the South Sudan Customs Service, which will form part of the clearance documents to be presented to customs and border checkpoints.

Organisational Requirements to Obtain Duty Free Status

United Nations Agencies

 There are no special requirements apart from submitting the necessary application and support documentation.

Non-Governmental Organizations

 Before being granted tax exemptions, all NGOs must be registered to operate in South Sudan. All NGOs must register for an NGO Operations Certificate with the Relief and Rehabilitation Commission (RRC). NGOs must also register with the Ministry of Legal Affairs and Constitutional Development (MoLaCD), Directorate of Registration of Businesses, Associations and NGOs to obtain a registration certificate. All NGOs must register for a Tax Identification Number (TIN) at any Directorate of Taxation branch office.

Exemption Certificate Application Procedure: 

Duties and Taxes Exemption Application Procedure

Generalities (include a list of necessary documentation)

  •  The National Directorate of Taxation has the responsibility of collecting all business, sales, withholding, and personal income tax within South Sudan.
  • The National Customs Services collects excise (for both national and state governments), sales tax, income tax and BPT/IT withholding tax on imported goods. Taxes to any government authority other than the National Directorate of Taxation or Customs Services (at the borders) should be refused.
  • The Ministry of Commerce also charges 20% of the value of the goods if no import license is available where required.
  • Tax exemption applications are handled by the Exemptions Unit of the South Sudan Customs Services.
  • Tax exemption requirements apply to the UN, UN agencies and NGOs alike.
  • Currently, only the Minister of MOFEP is authorised to grant exemptions following the advice of the Director General of Customs. Although the process of dealing with the application can be delegated within the South Sudan Customs Services, the Minister is required to sign the actual exemption letter.

Required Documents

    • “Request for Non-Diplomatic Exemptions from Taxes on Imports” application form
    • Application cover letter on organisation letterhead (NGO only)
    • Ministry of Foreign Affairs & International Cooperation’s cover letter (UN only)
    • Ministry of Finance and Economic Planning cover letter
    • Commercial or Pro-Forma Invoices
    • Donation Certificate (If applicable)
    • Transport Documents, Airway Bills (AWB’s) or Bill of Ladings (BOLs)
    • Packing List
    • Certificate of Origin
    • Operations Certificate. (NGOs only)
    • Registration Certificate. (NGOs only)
    • Purchase Order (PO) (UN only)
    • Certificate of Conformity

The process to be followed (step-by-step or flowchart)

  •  Complete the Request for Non-Diplomatic Exemptions from Taxes on Imports application form as per the instructions. This form can be obtained from the Exemptions unit of the South Sudan Customs Services in Juba, Nimule or Kaya.
  • Attach the required documentation.

As stated above, and where applicable,

  • Attach a cover letter detailing the request. The cover letter must be on the applying organisation's letterhead and addressed to the Director General of Customs Services, signed by the organisation representative, and citing relevant provisions in legislation.
  • UN ONLY:
    • Submit to the Ministry of Foreign Affairs & International Cooperation’s (MoFAIC) Privileges and Immunities Unit.
    • Submit an additional copy of the applying organisation cover letter.
    • The Privileges and Immunities office will write an additional cover letter to the Director General of Customs Services requesting the clearance of imported items.
  • NGOs ONLY:
    • Submit to the Relief and Rehabilitation Commission (RRC).
    • Request the RRC director general to write an additional cover letter to the Director of General of Customs Services requesting the clearance of imported items.
  • Submit an application to the Director General’s Customs Services office (Exemption Unit). Customs Services reviews request/documentation. The Director General of Customs Services gives his initial approval or rejection.
  • IF approved, the exemption application is sent to the Ministry of Finance and Economic Planning MoFEP for signature. Only the Minister of Finance and Economic Planning can sign the exemption.
    • MoFEP attaches its own cover letter.
  • Exemption application returns from MOFEP to the Customs Service office. The customs services office calculates the value that has to be exempted and notes it on the MoFEP cover letter attached to the application. **This arrangement is set to change whereby tax will be calculated before the application is sent to the Minister to save time. Customs Services DG Stamps and gives final approval.
  • IF Customs exemption is granted:
    • Applying organisation needs to stipulate an entry point.
       
      • IF airport (Juba): A copy of the documentation will be given for clearance.
      • IF border entry: A receipt will be given (detailing the exemption number) to the clearing agent. The original paperwork is sent to the relevant border point for clearance.
  • IF the application is rejected, the process is stopped and/or the organisation is asked for additional information or clarification. If the application is stopped, the organisation can appeal or restart the process. Appeals should be made directly to the Ministry of Finance and Economic Planning or his delegated representative.
  • NGOs ONLY:
    • Obtain Import Permits from the Ministry of Commerce, Industry and Investment.
    • Write a request letter for an import permit to the Undersecretary General of the Ministry of Commerce, Industry & Investment.
    • Include cover Letter, invoice(s), certificates & copy of the approved exemption receipt/documents from customs.
    • In some instances, a fine (20% of the value of the goods) can be levied at the border if this permit is not attached.
    • Import Permit is mandatory for all imports of medicines and medical products. This import permit fee is (500 SSP).

Additional Recommendations:

  • It is essential to collect a copy of the approved exemption application or receipt from the customs service’s office as lost documentation or delays at the border could force a re-application process.
  • Submit exemption applications well in advance, at least 3-4 weeks before arrival of shipment.
  • Submit any additional documentation that might support the exemption certification process, but which is not necessarily required.
  • Do not submit multiple applications for the same exemption request. Follow up with the ministry and only re-submit when custom services confirm that the initial application was lost or rejected.  Multiple applications can be viewed as suspicious and can cause the process to be delayed or the application rejected.
  • Ensure that relevant invoices are attached to all applications and declarations, including those made by clearance agents. Missing invoices calculate the duty exempted difficult, which can cause delays.
  • Ensure that the tax exemption application adequately defines the items being imported. This is especially crucial for capital items and vehicles. The chassis or serial numbers should be recorded. Any vehicle or piece of capital equipment imported under an exemption effectively remains under the control of Customs until it changes its status. That is, it is either re-exported, transferred to another entitled person/organisation or any residual duty paid if appropriate. In all these situations, permission of customs is required. At some stage, Customs will be required to verify some of these imports to ensure that goods have not leaked onto the home market inappropriately.

Exemption Certificate Document Requirements

Duties and Taxes Exemption Certificate Document Requirements (by commodity)

 

Food

NFI (Shelter, WASH, Education)

Medicines

Vehicle & Spare Parts

Staff & Office Supplies

Telecoms Equipment

Invoice

Yes, Certified Copy, applies to UN and NGOs

Yes, Certified Copy, applies to UN and NGOs

Yes, Certified Copy, applies to UN and NGOs

Yes, Certified Copy, applies to UN and NGOs

Yes, Certified Copy, applies to UN and NGOs

Yes, Certified Copy, applies to UN and NGOs

AWB/BL/Other Transport Documents

Yes, Certified Copy, applies to UN and NGOs

Yes, Certified Copy, applies to UN and NGOs

Yes, Certified Copy, applies to UN and NGOs

Yes, Certified Copy, applies to UN and NGOs

Yes, Certified Copy, applies to UN and NGOs

Yes, Certified Copy, applies to UN and NGOs

Donation/Non-Commercial Certificates

Yes, Certified Copy, applies to UN and NGOs

Yes, Certified Copy, applies to UN and NGOs

Yes, Certified Copy, applies to UN and NGOs

Yes, Certified Copy, applies to UN and NGOs

Yes, Certified Copy, applies to UN and NGOs

Yes, Certified Copy, applies to UN and NGOs

Packing Lists

Yes, Certified Copy, applies to UN and NGOs

Yes, Certified Copy, applies to UN and NGOs

Yes, Certified Copy, applies to UN and NGOs

Yes, Certified Copy, applies to UN and NGOs

Yes, Certified Copy, applies to UN and NGOs

Yes, Certified Copy, applies to UN and NGOs

Tax exemption application form

Yes, Original, applies to UN and NGOs

Yes, Original, applies to UN and NGOs

Yes, Original, applies to UN and NGOs

Yes, Original, applies to UN and NGOs

Yes, Original, applies to UN and NGOs

Yes, Original, applies to UN and NGOs

Application Cover Letter

Yes, Original, applies to UN and NGOs

Yes, Original, applies to UN and NGOs

Yes, Original, applies to UN and NGOs

Yes, Original, applies to UN and NGOs

Yes, Original, applies to UN and NGOs

Yes, Original, applies to UN and NGOs

MOFEP Cover Letter

Yes, Original, applies to UN and NGOs

Yes, Original, applies to UN and NGOs

Yes, Original, applies to UN and NGOs

Yes, Original, applies to UN and NGOs

Yes, Original, applies to UN and NGOs

Yes, Original, applies to UN and NGOs

Certificate of Origin

Yes, Certified Copy, applies to UN and NGOs

Yes, Certified Copy, applies to UN and NGOs

Yes, Certified Copy, applies to UN and NGOs

Yes, Certified Copy, applies to UN and NGOs

Yes, Certified Copy, applies to UN and NGOs

Yes, Certified Copy, applies to UN and NGOs

Operations Certificate

Yes, Certified Copy, applies to NGOs

Yes, Certified Copy, applies to NGOs

Yes, Certified Copy, applies to NGOs

Yes, Certified Copy, applies to NGOs

Yes, Certified Copy, applies to NGOs

Yes, Certified Copy, applies to NGOs

Registration Certificate

Yes, Certified Copy, applies to NGOs

Yes, Certified Copy, applies to NGOs

Yes, Certified Copy, applies to NGOs

Yes, Certified Copy, applies to NGOs

Yes, Certified Copy, applies to NGOs

Yes, Certified Copy, applies to NGOs

Tax Identification Number (TIN) Certificate

Yes, Certified Copy, applies to NGOs

Yes, Certified Copy, applies to NGOs

Yes, Certified Copy, applies to NGOs

Yes, Certified Copy, applies to NGOs

Yes, Certified Copy, applies to NGOs

Yes, Certified Copy, applies to NGOs

Import Permit from Ministry of Commerce, Industry, and Investment

Yes, Certified Copy, applies to NGOs

Yes, Certified Copy, applies to NGOs

Yes, Certified Copy, applies to NGOs

Yes, Certified Copy, applies to NGOs

Yes, Certified Copy, applies to NGOs

Yes, Certified Copy, applies to NGOs

Additional Notes

Submit any additional documentation that might support the exemption certification process, but which is not necessarily required.

Customs Clearance

General Information 

Customs Information

Document Requirements

Copy of the approved exemption application (including Exemption Number) and documentation for entry at borders. Exemption receives (including Exemption Number) for entry at Airport.

Embargoes

None

Prohibited Items

N/A

General Restrictions

N/A

Customs Clearance Document Requirements

Customs Clearance Document Requirements (by commodity)

 

Food

NFI (Shelter, WASH, Education)

Medicines

Vehicles & Spare Parts

Staff & Office Supplies

Telecoms Equipment

D&T Exemption Certificate

Yes, Original, 1 copy, applies to both UN and NGO

Yes, Original, 1 copy, applies to both UN and NGO

Yes, Original, 1 copy, applies to both UN and NGO

Yes, Original, 1 copy, applies to both UN and NGO

Yes, Original, 1 copy, applies to both UN and NGO

Yes, Original, 1 copy, applies to both UN and NGO

Invoice

Yes, Copy, applies to both UN and NGO

Yes, Copy, applies to both UN and NGO

Yes, Copy, applies to both UN and NGO

Yes, Copy, applies to both UN and NGO

Yes, Copy, applies to both UN and NGO

Yes, Copy, applies to both UN and NGO

AWB/BL/Other Transport Documents

Yes, Copy, applies to both UN and NGO

Yes, Copy, applies to both UN and NGO

Yes, Copy, applies to both UN and NGO

Yes, Copy, applies to both UN and NGO

Yes, Copy, applies to both UN and NGO

Yes, Copy, applies to both UN and NGO

Donation/Non-Commercial Certificates

Yes, Copy, applies to both UN and NGO

Yes, Copy, applies to both UN and NGO

Yes, Copy, applies to both UN and NGO

Yes, Copy, applies to both UN and NGO

Yes, Copy, applies to both UN and NGO

Yes, Copy, applies to both UN and NGO

Packing Lists

Yes, Copy, applies to both UN and NGO

Yes, Copy, applies to both UN and NGO

Yes, Copy, applies to both UN and NGO

Yes, Copy, applies to both UN and NGO

Yes, Copy, applies to both UN and NGO

Yes, Copy, applies to both UN and NGO

Phytosanitary Certificate

Yes, Copy, applies to both UN and NGO

Yes, Copy, applies to both UN and NGO

Yes, Copy, applies to both UN and NGO

Yes, Copy, applies to both UN and NGO

Yes, Copy, applies to both UN and NGO

Yes, Copy, applies to both UN and NGO

Import Permits

Yes, Copy, applies to NGO

Yes, Copy, applies to NGO

Yes, Copy, applies to NGO

Yes, Copy, applies to NGO

Yes, Copy, applies to NGO

Yes, Copy, applies to NGO

Additional Notes

Submit any additional documentation that might support the exemption certification process, but which is not necessarily required.

Transit Regime

All transit goods are declared at the point of import and travel under bond where the customs will validate and discharge the documentation and at point of exit from South Sudan. This is a relatively uncomplicated process and works well.

 

South Sudan, Republic of - 2 Logistics Infrastructure

The logistics infrastructure in South Sudan is in a poor state, with very little yearly maintenance undertaken. Nearly 40 years of conflict, underdevelopment, and virtually no investment have left the country with an ailing road network, limited air and water transport capacity and a large infrastructure gap.

Most roads and main transport corridors within the country comprise gravel roads severely affected by perennial flooding. The Juba to Nimule Road, Juba to Terekeka and Juba to Bor are currently the only sealed corridors connecting the country with neighbouring Uganda and other significant towns in the Country.  Little maintenance, low adherence to road rules by road users, and the inability to enforce road weight limits lead to the quick deterioration of roads and bridges. 

The country has access to hundreds of airstrips and helicopter landing areas; however, most of these are gravel strips. Encroachment and little to no maintenance create a hazardous flying environment at some airstrips. A limited number of airstrips are accessible by fixed-wing planes throughout the year, with a large number being accessible by helicopter or specialised aircraft (Buffalo) only. During the rainy season, the number of fixed-wing accessible airstrips further decreases. Currently, the country only has access to four asphalt runways in Juba, Paloich Wau and Malakal, and a few gravel strips capable of handling large aircraft. Current plans include the upgrade of Juba International Airport. As Paloich is a privately run airstrip, there are landing fees to be paid before departure, which is also applicable to UN Agencies.

The river Nile waterway network provides transport capacity to various downstream locations year-round. The barges and pushers have a capacity of 1,200mt per set (a set is comprised of 4 barges) but are old and unreliable from suffering from years of low investment. Compounded with security issues on the river, the turnaround times for barge movements from Bor to Malakal can vary from 2 to 6 months. WFP, at present, has a MoU for the cross-border movement of food and NFIs from Sudan into South Sudan using road and barge in the Renk corridor. Ports along the Nile are of poor standard and congested due to the current reliance on force protection for river movements. The River Sobat from Ethiopia is only open for 2-4 months of the year. Insecurity around the river has resulted in this being underutilised.

Mingkaman and Bor's ports are being supported for upgrades only.

For useful information on South Sudan's transport infrastructure, please see the following links:

https://www.afdb.org/en/countries/east-africa/south-sudan/south-sudan-and-the-afdb

South Sudan, Republic of - 2.1 Juba Port Assessment

Port Overview

South Sudan is a landlocked country. Juba Port forms part of a series of freshwater ports that run the country from Juba in the South to Renk on the border with Sudan along the River Nile. There are many offshoots of the main river i.e., Bentiu, however, these are usually only seasonally accessible and only by much smaller boats (20-60 mt). The Sobat River from Ethiopia is also only seasonally accessible for a few months of the year and recent insecurity has reduced the potential opportunities of using this riverway further west than Nasser. Historically, port operators ran operations up to the port of Kosti in Sudan, however, conflict and border closures have made this very difficult in recent times. The river network is a crucial alternative in the economical (compared to air) transport of large quantities of cargo into unity and Upper Nile states.

All port infrastructures are extremely basic. The loading/offloading is completed using porters and in the rainy season, trucks can have difficulty accessing the port areas due to mud build-up. 

Key port information may also be found at: http://www.maritime-database.com

 

Port Location and Contact

Country

South Sudan

Province or District

Central Equatoria State, Juba County

Nearest Town or City

with Distance from Port

Name: Juba

Km: 0

Port's Complete Name

Juba Port

Latitude

4.831111

Longitude

31.61444

Managing Company or Port Authority

Ministry of Roads and Transport

Director General for River Transport

Management Contact Person

Changes are more frequent, so We did not put names

Nearest Airport and Airlines with Frequent International Arrivals/Departures

Airport Name: Juba International Airport (JIA)

Airlines: Kenya Airways, Fly Dubai, Ethiopian Airlines, Egypt Air, Rwanda Air, Fly 540, Turkish Air, etc.

Port Picture

image-20240424112417-1

Description and Contacts of Key Companies

Various commercial companies are active in the port, from suppliers of heavy handling equipment such as cranes and smaller powerboat operators to large river barge companies. Three well-established barge-operating companies are present at the port. The companies Keer Marine Co, Nile Barges for River Transport Co, and MINCO Ltd. are the most prominent operators with access to large and diversified fleets, which include general, flat-top and fuel barges able to transport available bulk and neo-bulk cargo, as well as bulk and drummed fuel.

Due to the current border closures, these operators are not able to operate in Sudan and some reported that they also don’t have a fully realised fleet capacity. Handling equipment such as heavy-lift cranes and forklifts can be acquired either through barge operators or through a number of commercial companies in the market. These companies, however, don’t necessarily have a permanent presence at the port.

 

For more information on port contacts, please see the following link: 4.4 Port and Waterways Companies Contact List.

Port Performance

Juba port is the main river port in South Sudan. Other main ports in the country are in the towns of Bor, Mangalla, Shambe, Adok, Malakal, Melut and Renk. Barges are not confined to docking at these locations and will travel to where they are needed and where it is safest to dock. General cargo barges docking in Juba can contain anything from food and household goods to building supplies, heavy engineering machinery, vehicles, and fuel.

Port operations in general are constrained by inadequate infrastructure, cargo-handling equipment, and management. A powerful local labour union still controls all labour at the port and determines the loading and unloading charges. The local porter’s union also has access to several motorboats that can be hired directly from the owner/operators. The union has organized these owner/operator boats into a loose corporation and even though it is encouraged that prospective clients acquire their services through the union, the boats can be hired through direct negotiation with the owner.

The access corridor downstream of the port is said to be narrow and rocky which allows for barge entry or exit but not both simultaneously, the rocky bottom also makes docking procedures risky, especially when the river level is low. No permanent mooring fixtures are available, and barges are moored to mango trees growing on the riverbank. Damage to these trees results in a fine, paid either to the Ministry of Agriculture and Forestry or to the local community that owns the tree. The riverbank is receding, and erosion is an issue. Unloading/loading is mostly done manually or in the case of containers and heavy loads, a crane from one of the local commercial operators is hired. Barges are normally positioned, as close to flat ground on the riverbank for loading/offloading and using a crane to load/remove containers and heavy loads requires skill.

It is difficult to estimate the annual cargo tonnages at Juba and other ports, as consistent and reliable information is not readily available. Prior to the resumption of conflict, the Juba port authority does require barge operators to notify the port authority of incoming and outgoing vessels including a basic description of cargo; however, the recording system is rudimentary and not comprehensive. More accurate information can be obtained from barge operators, but most are reluctant to share such information. Due to conflict, clearance is required from authorities for any humanitarian barge traffic moving on the river.

Due to the low water between Juba and Bor ports which can ground the barges, Bor is favoured as a loading destination. This is also supported by a relatively good all-weather road from Juba to Bor.

Seasonal Constraints

 

Occurs

Time Frame

Rainy Season

Yes

May to October

Major Import Campaigns

No

N/A

Low water levels in some parts during the dry season

Yes, January to May

 

 

Handling Figures for 2022

Vessel Calls

There are no accurate figures as the offices at the port did not want to provide some information

Container Traffic (TEUs)

Difficult to estimate

 

Handling Figures Bulk and Break Bulk for 2022

Bulk (MT)

N/A

Break bulk (MT)

N/A

Discharge Rates and Terminal Handling Charges

Handling charges for river transport can cost up to US$ 50-35/mt. These charges are subject to location and determined by the porter’s union. Discharge rates are determined through direct negotiations with barge operators or the porter union and are based on the type of cargo that needs to be handled. 

Berthing Specifications

Type of Berth

Quantity

Length

(m)

Maximum

Draft (m)

Comments

Conventional Berth

1

35m

N/A

 

Container Berth

0

N/A

N/A

 

Silo Berth

0

N/A

N/A

 

Berthing Tugs

0

-

-

 

Water Barges

0

-

-

 


No permanent mooring fixtures are available, and barges are moored to mango trees growing on the riverbank or the single concrete jetty. Barges are normally moored as close to flat ground on the riverbank for loading/offloading.

General Cargo Handling Berths

Cargo Type

Berth Identification

Imports - Bagged Cargo

N/A

Exports - Bagged Cargo

N/A

Imports and Exports - RoRo

N/A

Other Imports

N/A

Port Handling Equipment

Juba port has no permanent cargo handling equipment. The port has one concrete jetty and gantry crane; however, the crane is frequently broken down.  Porters who physically load and offload cargo from boats and barges do most of the cargo handling. For heavy and containerised cargo, equipment such as cranes can be hired from private companies and owners for a fee.

The use of the port gantry crane can be negotiated from the port authority directly.

Equipment

Available

Total Quantity and Capacity Available

Comments on Current Condition and Actual Usage

Dockside Crane

No

N/A

N/A

Container Gantries

Yes

1(2.5mt)

The crane is frequently inoperable. Privately operated cranes need to be hired for container loads.

Mobile Cranes

Yes

Varies

Mobile cranes are privately owned. 

Reachstacker

No

N/A

N/A

RoRo Tugmaster (with Trailer)

No

N/A

N/A

Grain Elevator with Bagging Machines

No

N/A

N/A

Transtainer

No

N/A

N/A

Forklifts

Yes

Varies

Forklifts are privately owned and need to be hired. 

Container Facilities

No permanent container facilities are present. Containers are loaded and offloaded directly to and from waiting trucks utilising locally hired commercial cranes. Rates vary little between operators, and one container counts as one lift. Charged at US$ 150 per lift, an average mobilisation fee of US$ 250 is also applicable. Depending on the amount of work, a daily rate of up to US$ 1,500 can be negotiated.

The storage of containers is the owner's responsibility unless otherwise agreed with the barge operators.

Facilities

20 ft

40 ft

Container Facilities Available

None

None

Container Freight Station (CFS)

No such capacity

No such capacity

Refrigerated Container Stations

No such capacity

No such capacity

Other Capacity Details

-

-

Daily Take-Off Capacity
(Containers per Day)

N/A

N/A

Number of Reefer Stations
(Connection Points)

None

None

Emergency Take-off Capacity

No Such capacity

No Such capacity

Offtake Capacity of Gang Shift
(Containers per Shift)

N/A

N/A

Customs Guidance

Juba port is mainly concerned with the domestic movement of cargo, and since the recent border closures, customs facilities have yet to be available on site. Where applicable, customs clearance for cross-border cargo is handled at land at border entry points or at downstream customs facilities.

 

For more information on customs in South Sudan please see the following link: 1.3 Customs Information

Terminal Information

MULTIPURPOSE TERMINAL

No such capacity. All barges dock to load and offload cargo either directly onto the riverbank (300 m) or on the single concrete jetty (35 m). No RoRo facilities are available, and barges moor as close to the riverbank as possible to allow vehicles to board. This requires a great amount of skill.

GRAIN AND BULK HANDLING

No such capacity. Cargo arrives packaged and bagged. 

MAIN STORAGE TERMINAL

No such capacity. Storage remains the responsibility of the cargo owner unless otherwise arranged by barge operators. Plans are in place by various operators to construct storage facilities and holding areas, including cold storage facilities, at dedicated storage yards off-site or at privately owned terminals.

 

Storage Type

Number of Storage Facilities

Area (m2)

Bagged Cargo

0

0

Refrigerated Cargo

0

0

General Cargo

0

10,000m²

Stevedoring

Stevedoring services can be arranged directly with barge operators or directly from the local labour union, which organises all labour at the port. There is also no fixed rate for stuffing or de-stuffing barges or containers, and although general rates exist for certain types of cargo, these would need to be negotiated directly.

There are no labour shortages, and the union has access to more than 70 porters at any one time, with the ability to quickly scale up its labour requirements. Transparency within the pricing structure remains an issue, as the rates are dynamic, vary between the different ports in the country, and are primarily determined by the labour union.  

Hinterland Information

The only means by which cargo can be moved out of the port is by road. Access to the port is generally unrestrictive and privately owned trucks can enter and exit the main port facility.

The cargo transport in and out of the port is the owner's responsibility, but transport can be arranged through the barge operators or private transport companies. Large and smaller companies can provide such services; however, capacity and rates vary.

Port Security

Juba port has basic security with a manned access gate allowing entry into the main port facility. Due to the number of vehicles and people requiring access, enforcing effective access control is problematic. Permanent health and safety, medical and firefighting facilities are not on-site, and the port relies entirely on municipal emergency services.

A perimeter fence surrounds the port facility; however, this fence serves as little deterrence, leaving cargo, vehicles, and other assets at risk.  Barge operators usually have their security that remains on board vessels. Current plans to upgrade the port facilities include, amongst others, the revision of security protocols, implementation of stringent access control measures, and the installation of additional lighting.

Security

ISPS Compliant

No

Current ISPS Level
(Level 1 = Normal, Level 2 = Heightened, Level 3 = Exceptional)

N/A, Level 1 = Normal, Level 2 = Heightened, Level 3 = Exceptional

Police Boats

None

Fire Engines

None

 

 

South Sudan, Republic of - 2.1.1 Port of Total/Malualgurubar

Port Overview

Total/Malualgurubar port is in Bor South Sudan along Juba-Bor highway, it is under the management of WFP and is along the main river (River Nile). Barges and boats are used in this port mainly for loading/offloading of food commodities and NFIs (WFPs/ Logistics cluster). Some barge and boat owners have speedboats and depending on need, they can be hired to escort the barge and boat movements. The boat/barge operators ran the operations in all rivers the locations. The port operates in all locations along the North and has offshoots to Mangala, Minkaman and Juba.

The port has a well confined docking site for barges and boats however vessel dock at intervals.  The offshoot from Juba highway to the port is murram road of about half KM and Cargo handling both loading and offloading is done by local labours and the rates are fluctuating depending on existing country’s economy.

Key port information may also be found at: http://www.maritime-database.com

 

Port Location and Contact

Country

South Sudan

Province or District

Jonglei state, Bor- South

Nearest Town or City

with Distance from Port

Bor Town

DISTANCE (15)

Port's Complete Name

Malualgorubar (Total) port

Latitude

6.11569

Longitude

31.57925 deg Alt 468m

Managing Company or Port Authority

WFP management

Management Contact Person

WFP-Logistics Unit

Nearest Airport and Airlines with Frequent International Arrivals/Departures

AIRPORT NAME: Bor Airport

LIST OF INTERNATIONAL CARRIERS: N/A

Port Picture

image-20240424113151-1

 

Description and Contacts of Key Companies

The commercial companies do not have permanent presence at the port, however all WFP contracted commercial companies are active in this port depending on need and boat/barge cargo allocations granted to them, they can then position their boats and barges.  Companies of heavy handling equipment’s (Cranes) operate at this port on request basis, examples of boat and barge companies; Ludier General Trading CO. Ltd, Transway Transporters and Logistics, Mango Tree Marine, Sharrow Trading, and investment CO. Ltd, interlink Inc, Northgate General Trading CO. Ltd for the boat operators and B&S group, Nile Barges, and Internet International trade and Transport Co/ltd for the barges.

 

For more information on port contacts, please see the following link: 4.4 Port and Waterways Companies Contact List.

Port Performance

The port has a well confined docking site for barges and boats however vessels dock at intervals due to insufficient docking area. The channel draft is estimated to 2–3-meter depth and reduces during dry season. Only metallic Barges and Boats of type used in South Sudan and neighbouring countries sharing the river Nile can operate in this port and no other larger vessel with containerized lot. The port is solely used for transportation of humanitarian Cargo mainly WFP food items and Non- Food Items for UN agencies and humanitarian Organizations. The port capacity is limited to loading of one vessel at a time, the port has no handling equipment, and most cargo is handled manually. The port is accessible from the offshoot of Juba-Bor Highway and is located about half kilometre from the highway, the access road is murram and can support the movement of 40Mt truck capacity. The port is located on the main river Nile, and it serves many locations downstream the river Nile and other sub rivers and waterways like zarf, Sobat, and lake Tayar. The loading capacity is about 200-300Mt per day and the lead time is as per size of the vessel.

 

Seasonal Constraints

 

Occurs

Time Frame

Rainy Season

Yes

From April to November

Major Import Campaigns

 No

N/A

Low water levels making access less navigable during dry season and during rainy season movement of water weeds causing blockage to certain waterways.

 

 

Handling Figures for 2023

Vessel Calls

Estimated 10 barge movement throughout the year, with approtimately-1500Mt per barge.

Estimated 200 boat movement through the year with boat capacity ranging from 150-250 Mt per boat.

 

Container Traffic (TEUs)

N/A

 

Handling Figures Bulk and Break Bulk for 2023

Bulk (MT)

N/A

Break bulk (MT)

45000MT

Discharge Rates and Terminal Handling Charges

Handling charges depends on weight of cargo, quantity, and type of cargo. The rates are determined by leader of port union and barge/boat operators. The Non-food items rates are negotiable while the rate for food commodities is fixed.

Berthing Specifications

Type of Berth

Quantity

Length

(m)

Maximum

Draft (m)

Comments

Conventional Berth

0

N/A

N/A

 

Container Berth

0

N/A

N/A

 

Silo Berth

0

N/A

N/A

 

Berthing Tugs

0

 N/A

N/A

 

Water Barges

     

 


Barges and boats are moored on trees along riverbanks as there are no permanent mooring fixtures at the port.

General Cargo Handling Berths

Cargo Type

Berth Identification

Imports - Bagged Cargo

N/A

Exports - Bagged Cargo

N/A

Imports and Exports - RoRo

N/A

Other Imports

N/A

Port Handling Equipment

Is the port equipment managed by the government or privately?

 The port is managed by WFP and no existence of port equipment’s. For Handling of heavy equipment’s, such as generators and containerized cargo, cranes are hired from private companies and for the bagged, cartoons and other parcel cargo, porters physically handle both the loading and offloading at a cost. Hired commercial cranes helps in loading and offloading of containers depending on request. The rates are as per the contract, ranging from 600-1200$ per workload/rotations.

 

Equipment

Available

Total Quantity and Capacity Available

Comments on Current Condition and Actual Usage

Dockside Crane

No

No

Hired commercial cranes

Container Gantries

No

N/A

N/A

Mobile Cranes

No

No

Hired commercial cranes

Reachstacker

No

N/A

N/A

RoRo Tugmaster (with Trailer)

No

N/A

N/A

Grain Elevator with Bagging Machines

No

N/A

N/A

Transtainer

No

N/A

N/A

Forklifts

No

N/A

Hired commercial forklifts

 

Container Facilities

No container facilities neither storage.

Facilities

20 ft

40 ft

Container Facilities Available

None

None

Container Freight Station (CFS)

N/A

N/A

Refrigerated Container Stations

N/A

N/A

Other Capacity Details

   N/A

N/A

Daily Take Off Capacity
(Containers per Day)

N/A

N/A

Number of Reefer Stations
(Connection Points)

N/A

N/A

Emergency Take-off Capacity

N/A

N/A

Off take Capacity of Gang Shift
(Containers per Shift)

N/A

N/A

Customs Guidance

The port is mainly involved with coordination of WFP- humanitarian food and Non-Food items that is exempted from custom taxation. The port mainly serves deliveries within the country with no cross-border operation.

 

For more information on customs in South Sudan, please see the following link: 1.3 Customs Information

Terminal Information

MULTIPURPOSE TERMINAL

N/A

GRAIN AND BULK HANDLING

N/A

MAIN STORAGE TERMINAL

The port is connected to warehouse premise with 30 existing Mobile storage Units (MSUs) for indoor storage and a large yard for outdoor storage. The warehouse serves as a hub for storage of food and Non-food supplies for further river deliveries.

 

Storage Type

Number of Storage Facilities

Area (m2)

Bagged Cargo

27(about 12000Mt)

7500

Refrigerated Cargo

0

0

General Cargo

3(1500CBM)

840

Stevedoring

There are no stevedoring companies however the offloading is directly arranged by boat and barge operators and casual labourers (porters). The rates for loading and offloading varies depending on type and weight of cargo. There is no shortage of labours, there can be available more than 100 labours available to perform any task.

Hinterland Information

Road is used to move cargo out of the port and access to the port is only to commercial trucks carrying WFP Food and other humanitarian cargo.

 

Port Security

The access road to total port is through the WFP warehouse facility which has security personnel, and all vehicles and people requiring access into the port must clear with the security personnel. The area is fenced, has solar lighting and minor firefighting facilities such as fire extinguishers distributed in MSUs premises. During loading and offloading, boat and barge operators normally have their own security that remains on water vessels.

Security

ISPS Compliant

No

Current ISPS Level
(Level 1 = Normal, Level 2 = Heightened, Level 3 = Exceptional)

N/A

Police Boats

No

Fire Engines

No

 

South Sudan, Republic of - 2.2 Aviation

2.2 South Sudan Aviation

Key airport information may also be found at: http://worldaerodata.com/

Civil aviation falls under the authority of the Ministry of Transport and South Sudan, which has been a member of the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) since 10 November 2011. In 2013, the South Sudan Civil Aviation Authority was established, and this statutory authority aims to formally oversee and regulate the country's aviation industry, airline companies, and operations. South Sudan’s Juba International Airport (JIA) is the only airport receiving flights from international commercial airline carriers. The other significant airports include Wau, Malakal and Rumbek.

The aviation industry is generally characterised by decades of underdevelopment, little investment in infrastructure, low capacity and a poor safety record and adherence to international standards. The country is, however, readily accessible by air as there are hundreds of fixed-wing and helicopter landing sites spread out across the country, of which more than 50 airstrips are serviceable by fixed-wing aircraft. Most of these strips are gravel, however, and only accessible by light aircraft. Only Juba, Paloich, Malakal and Wau airports currently have asphalted runways capable of handling large aircraft.

The availability of fuel, aircraft maintenance facilities and handling services remains an issue, especially in remote areas. A few private sector operators can supply fuel at the various significant airports; however, fuel is imported from neighbouring countries, increasing costs and risking fuel shortages, especially during the rainy season. Basic repairs and maintenance can be conducted in South Sudan; however, significant repairs must be conducted in neighbouring countries or, in some cases, Europe.

More recently, a concerted effort by the government is being made to upgrade existing aviation infrastructure, expand the network, and manage its airspace. The runways of major airports such as Wau and Malakal have been upgraded to asphalt. Recently, there have also been growths in commercial, domestic carriers, air charter and airfreight companies providing reliable service.

For more information on government agency and airport company contact information, please see the following links: 4.1 Government Contact List and 4.5 Airport Companies Contact List.

Procedures for Foreign-Registered Aircraft

In South Sudan, the Civil Aviation Authority is responsible for the registration of foreign aircraft operating within the country.  The CAA is currently working on a formal process to register foreign aircraft operating in South Sudan and the current process is largely uncomplicated. 

General Aviation:

1) Register for a business license from the Ministry of Justice as per regular business registration procedures.  This includes registering for a Tax Identification Number (TIN).

2) Write an application letter, on company letterhead addressed to the Director General of Civil Aviation, expressing the company’s intentions of operating in South Sudan.

3) Attach:

    • List of aircraft intended to operate in South Sudan, including aircraft details and roles i.e. cargo or passenger aircraft;
    • All relevant aircraft documentation such as insurance and most recent maintenance inspection/reviews.
    • All relevant pilot documentation such as recent medical certificates and licenses;
    • Organizational diagram including maintenance and engineering staff;
    • Business and TIN registration documentation.

4) Submit to the Civil Aviation Authority for approval.

The Director of Aviation Safety and flight operations office will review the submitted application and inspect the aircraft and aircrew upon arrival in South Sudan.

  • If approved, it will issue a permit to operate in South Sudan.
  • If denied, the applying organization will be asked for additional clarification and/or documentation. The CAA could also contact the country of origin for further information.

Humanitarian Aviation:

1) Write an application letter, on organization letter head addressed to Director General of Civil Aviation, expressing the organizations intensions of operating in South Sudan.

2) Attach:

  • List of aircraft intended to operate in South Sudan, including aircraft roles i.e., cargo or passenger aircraft.
  • All relevant aircraft documentation such as insurance and most recent maintenance inspection/reviews.
  • All relevant pilot documentation such as recent medical certificates and licenses. 
  • Organizational diagram including maintenance and engineering staff;
  • Operations certificate, registration certificate, and TIN registration documentation (NGOs Only).

3) Submit to the Civil Aviation Authority for approval.

4) The Director of aviation safety and flight operations office will review documentation and inspect the aircraft and aircrew upon arrival in South Sudan.

  • If approved, it will issue a permit to operate in South Sudan.
  • If denied, the applying organization will be asked for additional clarification and/or documentation. The CAA could also contact the country of origin.

Other Comments:

  • The duration of the operating permit issued by the CAA is limited to the duration of the aircraft insurance.
  • The process timeline for registering foreign aircraft is fairly short as the process is relatively uncomplicated.
  • Currently, no fees are applicable to register foreign aircraft.
  • This registration process is subject to change as the CAA is currently formalising the process of registering foreign aircraft. 

For more information on procedures for foreign-registered aircraft, please see the following attachments:

 

 

South Sudan, Republic of - 2.2.1 Juba International Airport

Juba International Airport is a joint civilian and military airfield with the SPLA, UNMISS, UNHAS and commercial airlines sharing the crowded airport facilities. The airport consists of a single asphalt runway, adjacent apron, terminal and emergency support buildings, control tower and fueling facilities. Apart from the main terminal building servicing all arriving and departing commercial and UNHAS flights, is an additional separate VIP terminal building which receives visiting dignitaries.
New terminal buildings have been under construction for some time; however there are no clear indications on its completion date. UNMISS also have a separate departure and arrival building located within the UNMISS compound with direct access to the airport to facilitate UNMISS flights. Including UNMISS and UNHAS flights, the airport is currently being serviced by an ever growing number of national and international commercial carriers and aircraft charter companies resulting, in an average of 60 ATMs a day. Several international airlines are operating in and out of Juba on a daily basis.

Airport operations in general are constrained by ageing and inadequate infrastructure. The current terminal buildings are small and unable to handle the increasing number of cargo and passengers arriving daily. There is no separate cargo terminal building and cargo is loaded and offloaded in a designated cargo area and transported to the customs warehouse on site for further processing. From July 2014, upgrades started including extension of the airport's runway from 2,400 meters to 3,100 meters, construction of more parking lots, and expansion of immigration offices. This is expected to be largely completed by mid 2016.

Location Details
Country South Sudan Latitude 4.870033
Province / District Central Equatoria State Longitude 31.60134
Town or City (Closest) Juba Elevation (ft and m) 1,513 ft / 461m
Airfield Name Juba International Airport IATA and ICAO Codes JUB & HSSJ
Open From (hours) 07:30am Open To (hours) 18:00pm

Runways

Juba International Airport has a single runway capable of handling large, heavy aircraft. The runway is asphalt and in good condition. There are currently no surface issues or other concerns such as flooding, unsolicited access, standing water or water drainage and the runway is accessible through all weather conditions. 

JIA only has one runway servicing all air traffic. 

Runway #1

Runway Dimensions

2,400 (m) X 175 (m)

Orientation

13/31

Surface

Asphalt

Helicopter Pad(s)

Juba airport has two designated helicopter landing areas towards opposite ends of the runway. Towards the western end of the airport, and adjacent to the UNMISS compound, part of the taxiway and a large open gravel area is reserved for UNMISS and humanitarian helicopters. Towards the eastern end of the runway and adjacent to the cargo apron, a smaller area is reserved for military and commercial helicopters.

Helipad #1

Present (Yes / No)

Yes

Largest helicopter that can land

Mi-26

Width and Length (metres)

200 (m) x 250 (m)

Surface

Asphalt & Gravel

Airport Infrastructure Details

The airport consists of a single asphalt runway, adjacent apron, terminal and emergency support buildings, control tower and fueling facilities. Operational performance constraints are mainly influenced by the airports ability to handle daily air traffic movements with aircraft separation, available parking space, and subsequent passenger, cargo and aircraft service rates as some of the principal influencing factors.

Airport facilities are characterized by ageing and inadequate infrastructure. The current terminal buildings are small and unable to handle the increasing number of cargo and passengers arriving daily. There is no separate cargo terminal building and cargo is loaded and offloaded in a designated cargo area and transported to the customs warehouse on site for further processing. 

Customs

Yes

JET A-1 fuel

Yes

Immigration

Yes

AVGAS 100

Yes

Terminal Building

Yes

Single Point Refueling

Yes

Passenger Terminal

Yes

Air Starter Units

Yes

Cargo terminal

No

Ground Power (mobile)

Yes

Pax transport to airfield

No

Ground Handling Services

Yes

Control Tower

Yes

Latrine Servicing

No

Weather Facilities

No

Fire Fighting Category (ICAO)

7

Catering Services

No

De-icing Equipment

No

Base Operating Room

No

Parking Ramp Lighting

No

Airport Radar

Yes

Approach & Runway Lights

No

NDB

Yes

VOR

Yes

ILS

No

 

 

Passenger and Cargo Performance Indicator

Current operations at JIA are relatively un-complex compared with other international airports owning to the single runway, small apron, and taxiway and terminal infrastructure size and layout. Operational performance constraints are mainly influenced by the airports ability to handle daily air traffic movements with aircraft separation, available parking space, and subsequent passenger, cargo and aircraft service rates as some of the principal influencing factors.

Current capacity delivers approximately 60 ATMs per day while at periods of high demand this number can exceed 100 ATMs. Currently the airport processes an average of 1300 passengers per day arriving and departing on all international, UNHAS and domestic flights. Whilst only a limited number of aircraft are able to park at any one time, a small arrival’s and departure terminal, and the outdated check-in, customs and immigrations and baggage collection areas further hamper the ability of the airport to process larger numbers of passengers.

Private companies mostly do cargo handling and the airports ability to handle bulk and other air cargo is hampered by the lack of a dedicated cargo terminal, handling equipment and a small customs warehouse. It is difficult to ascertain the total cargo handling figures for JIA. JIA is however the main destination for, and origin of cargo transported by air within South Sudan. The airport has neither a dedicated cargo terminal nor bulk cargo handling facilities.

Performance for 2014

Annual Figures

Monthly Daily

Total aircraft movements

21900 1800 60

Total passengers

n/a n/a n/a

Total capacity of the airport (metric tonnes)

n/a n/a n/a

Current activity of the airport (metric tonnes)

n/a n/a n/a

Current use by Humanitarian flights (UNHAS)

5475-6570 480-540 15-18

Airport Operating Details

Operating Details
Maximum sized aircraft which can be offloaded on bulk cargo: No Such capacity
Maximum sized aircraft that can be offloaded on pallet IL-76
Total aircraft parking area (m²) 7,500m2
Storage Area (mt) n/a Cubic Meters (m³) n/a
Cargo Handling Equipment Available (Yes / No) Yes If "Yes" specify below
Elevators / Hi Loaders (Yes / No) Yes Max Capacity (mt) n/a
Can elevators / hi loaders reach the upper level of a B747 (Yes / No) No
Loading Ramps (Yes / No) No

Storage Facilities

The only storage facilities available at the airport are three large, private, bonded warehouses, a part of which are rented out to the government and serves as the airports customs warehouse. The warehouses are approximately 850m2. 

Airfield Cost

Navigation Charges

Navigation charges are currently not applicable to JIA

Aircraft Weight - MTOW (kg)

Navigation (per journey) USD - $

Landing USD - $

Night Landing USD - $

Night Take-Off USD - $

Parking Handling Charges
0 7,000 n/a 172 - 265 0 0 70 n/a
7,001 136,000 n/a 265 - 1843 0 0 70 n/a
136,001 and over n/a 1843 - 2083 0 0

70

n/a

Note 1: Night landing is not permitted unless in an emergency

Note 2: Parking charges are USD70 regardless of aircraft

Note 3: All of these charges are administered by the CAA and are the same for all airports in Juba

Fuel Services Charges

Individual commercial companies determine fuel service charges. At the time of this study the average service charge was an all-inclusive USD$1.80 per litre. 

Cargo Terminal Charges

JIA currently has no cargo terminal. Cargo is handled by commercial companies and or clearing agents. 

Air-bridge Charges

No such capacity

Security

Airport security is the responsibility of the Civil Aviation Authority. In addition to aviation security personnel, the SSPS, SPLA and other national security agencies also have a presence at the airport.
Perimeter fencing is present, well maintained and surrounds the airport preventing access to the runway and airport grounds. Stringent access control to the main terminal building, departure lounge and administrative buildings is maintained, however the layout of the buildings, increased airport traffic and number of public and passengers needing access to the airport makes access and crowd control difficult.
The vehicle parking and public waiting areas are situated in close proximity to the terminal buildings and although the majority of vehicular traffic is directed to the main open parking area, a large number of vehicles still have access to parking close to the terminal buildings. A small vehicle gate also allows direct access from the parking area to the baggage areas and runway beyond. Access to the airport control tower and airport administration area is also relatively unrestrictive.
Security equipment such as metal detectors and X-ray machines are present, but is frequently broken down. One X-ray machine serving all checked-in baggage on domestic and international flights is currently operational. As a result, airport security personnel also physically examine passengers, baggage and cargo upon entering or exiting the airport. The CAA recently introduced a new ID card system for authorized personnel.

 

For information on South Sudan airport company contact details, please see the following links:

AZ Freight information on South Sudan 

South Sudan, Republic of - 2.2.2 Malakal National Airport

Airport Overview

South Sudan has many airstrips across the country. These airstrips are mostly rudimentary gravel landing strips that are accessible by robust fixed-wing aircraft and helicopters. Of these approximately 50 airstrips are regularly serviced by UNHAS and other commercial charters. Apart from JIA only 3 other airstrips, Wau, Paloich and Malakal, have asphalt runways. Current plans are in place to upgrade the runway at Rumbek airport to asphalt and further expand the current airport network.

Airport Location and Contact

Country

South Sudan

Province or District

Upper Nile State

Nearest Town or City
with Distance from Airport

Malakal

02 km North of City

Airport’s Complete Name

Malakal Airport

Latitude

9.558889

Longitude

31.652222

Elevation (ft and m)

1,900 ft

IATA Code

   MAK

ICAO Code

HJMK

Managing Company or Airport Authority

CAA

Management Contact Person

Thon Monykur

+211911161472

+211914308895

NGO and/or UN Presence at Airport?

Yes

Runway(s)

Runway #1

Runway Dimensions

2000 (m) X 40 (m)

Runway Orientation

 04 & 22

Runway Surface

Asphalt

Runway Condition

Good

Airport Infrastructure Details

Infrastructure

Passenger / Cargo Security Screening

Yes

Runway Lighting

No

Refuelling Capacity

Yes

Ground Handling Services

Yes

Air Traffic Control

Yes

Fire Fighting Equipment

Yes

Weather Information

Yes

Aircraft Parking Space

Yes

Navigation Aids

No

Perimeter Fencing

Yes

Windsock

Yes

 

 

Fuel Services Charges

The Fuel is provided by Fine Jet and Tristar at Malakal Airport and prices vary according to the contract with airline companies.
 

Royalties / Non-Objection Fees (NOFs)

N/A

 

 

South Sudan, Republic of - 2.2.3 Wau National Airport

Airport Overview

South Sudan has many airstrips across the country. These airstrips are mostly rudimentary gravel landing strips that are accessible by robust fixed-wing aircraft and helicopters. Of these approximately 50 airstrips are regularly serviced by UNHAS and other commercial charters. Apart from JIA only 3 other airstrips, Wau, Paloich and Malakal, have asphalt runways. Current plans are in place to upgrade the runway at Rumbek airport to asphalt and further expand the current airport network.

Airport Location and Contact

Country

South Sudan

Province or District

Upper Nile State

Nearest Town or City
with Distance from Airport

Malakal

02 km North of City

Airport’s Complete Name

Malakal Airport

Latitude

9.558889

Longitude

31.652222

Elevation (ft and m)

1,900 ft

IATA Code

   MAK

ICAO Code

HJMK

Managing Company or Airport Authority

CAA

Management Contact Person

Thon Monykur

+211911161472

+211914308895

NGO and/or UN Presence at Airport?

Yes


Runway(s)

Runway #1

Runway Dimensions

2000 (m) X 40 (m)

Runway Orientation

 04 & 22

Runway Surface

Asphalt

Runway Condition

Good

Airport Infrastructure Details

Infrastructure

Passenger / Cargo Security Screening

Yes

Runway Lighting

No

Refuelling Capacity

Yes

Ground Handling Services

Yes

Air Traffic Control

Yes

Fire Fighting Equipment

Yes

Weather Information

Yes

Aircraft Parking Space

Yes

Navigation Aids

No

Perimeter Fencing

Yes

Windsock

Yes

 

 

Fuel Services Charges

The Fuel is provided by Fine Jet and Tristar at Malakal Airport and prices vary according to the contract with airline companies.

Royalties / Non-Objection Fees (NOFs)

N/A

 

 

South Sudan, Republic of - 2.2.4 Rumbek National Airport

Airport Overview

Rumbek Airport is in Rumbek Central CountyWestern Lakes State, in central South Sudan, near the town of Rumbek. Its location lies approximately 302 kilometres (188 mi), by air, northwest of Juba International Airport, the largest airport in the country.[1] Rumbek Airport is located at an altitude of 420 metres (1,380 ft) above sea level.[2] The geographical coordinates of this airport are: 6° 49' 48.00"N, 29° 40' 12.00"E (Latitude: 6.83000; Longitude: 29.6700).

Airport Location and Contact

Country

South Sudan

Province or District

Lakes State

Nearest Town or City
with Distance from Airport

Rumbek Centre

1 (km)

Airport’s Complete Name

Rumbek Airport

Latitude

6.83000

Longitude

29.6700

Elevation (ft and m)

1380ft/420m

IATA Code

 RBX

ICAO Code

HJRB

Managing Company or Airport Authority

SSCAA

Management Contact Person

Mr. Emmanuel Airport Manager

NGO and/or UN Presence at Airport?

Yes

Runway(s)

Runway #1

Runway Dimensions

1330 (m)

Runway Orientation

 01/19

Runway Surface

Gravel

Runway Condition

Good

Airport Infrastructure Details

Infrastructure

Passenger / Cargo Security Screening

Yes

Runway Lighting

No

Refuelling Capacity

Yes

Ground Handling Services

Yes

Air Traffic Control

Yes

Fire Fighting Equipment

Yes

Weather Information

No

Aircraft Parking Space

Yes

Navigation Aids

No

Perimeter Fencing

Yes

Windsock

Yes

 

 

Fuel Services Charges

In Rumbek fuel service is provided by an external supplier; Finejet and Tristar who are contracted by the HQ. The refuelling process is always supervised by the UNHAS ground staff who collect the copies of the receipts on behalf of WFP and then compiled and verify it in the mid-month and at the end of the month then sent to Juba for payment.

 

Price per Litre USD - $

Jet A-1

1 USD

Avgas

-

 

Royalties / Non-Objection Fees (NOFs)

N/A

 

 

South Sudan, Republic of - 2.3 Road Network

The road network in South Sudan is characterised by limited coverage and capacity, presenting significant challenges for transportation and connectivity. The road infrastructure is underdeveloped, lacking paved roads and inadequate maintenance. The road network primarily consists of unpaved and poorly maintained roads, making transportation difficult, especially during the rainy season when many roads become impassable.

Coverage of the road network is limited, particularly in remote and rural areas. Primary roads connect significant towns and cities, but access to rural communities is often limited or non-existent. This hampers economic development, access to essential services, and the movement of goods and people across the country.

One of the significant challenges facing the road network in South Sudan is the lack of investment in infrastructure development and maintenance. Limited financial resources have resulted in inadequate road maintenance, leading to further deterioration of the existing roads. This, coupled with the country's harsh climate and topography, exacerbates the challenges of maintaining the road network.

To address these challenges, the government of South Sudan has initiated national development and investment programs to improve the road network. These programs aim to expand road coverage, rehabilitate existing roads, and construct new infrastructure. The government has sought partnerships with international organisations and donor agencies to secure funding for these projects.

Despite these efforts, significant obstacles and bottlenecks remain. Insecurity and conflicts in certain regions of the country pose challenges to the implementation of road projects. Additionally, the vastness of the country and the need for extensive road construction present logistical and financial challenges.

In terms of maintenance, the government is working towards establishing sustainable maintenance programs. This includes training local personnel for road maintenance activities and procuring necessary equipment. However, a lack of resources and technical expertise remains a hurdle to effective maintenance.

For more information on government contact details, please see the following link: 4.1 Government Contact List.

Road Security

The road security situation in South Sudan remains a significant concern, posing numerous challenges and risks for pedestrians and motorists. The country's road infrastructure is relatively underdeveloped, with poorly maintained and inadequate roads exacerbating security issues. One of the primary areas of issue is the prevalence of armed conflicts and intercommunal violence, which directly impacts road safety.

In many regions of South Sudan, armed groups operate along major highways, leading to frequent road blockades, ambushes, and vehicle attacks. These incidents not only endanger travellers' lives but also impede the flow of goods and humanitarian aid across the country. Moreover, the presence of landmines and unexploded ordnance from past conflicts further adds to the risks faced by road users.

Another significant issue is the lack of law enforcement and traffic management systems. The scarcity of well-trained and equipped police forces hampers their ability to patrol and regulate traffic effectively. This absence of proper enforcement allows for reckless driving behaviours, such as speeding, drunk driving, and vehicle overloading, which contribute to a high rate of accidents and fatalities on South Sudan's roads.

Additionally, the absence of proper lighting, signage, and road markings poses a significant hazard, especially during night-time travel. The lack of streetlights and reflective materials increases the chances of accidents and makes navigation more difficult. Furthermore, the inadequate communication infrastructure hampers emergency response systems, making it challenging to provide timely assistance to road accident victims.

Addressing these road security issues in South Sudan requires a comprehensive approach that includes investing in road infrastructure development, enhancing law enforcement capabilities, demining efforts, and promoting road safety awareness among the population. Only through concerted efforts and collaboration between the government, international organisations, and local communities can South Sudan make significant progress in ensuring safer roads for its citizens.

Weighbridges and Axle Load Limits

Currently, there are no weighbridges in the country and low capacity to enforce axle load limits.
South Sudan is adjusting to the regional axle load limits set through the Common Market for Eastern and Southern Africa (COMESA) and East African Community (EAC) requirements, which is currently set at a maximum of 56 tonnes with a 0% weighbridge allowance. These requirements permit some of the highest Gross Vehicle Mass limits in the world; however, countries in the region apply these load limits differently, so vehicles travelling through the region to South Sudan will be subject to compliance with the lowest axle load limit. Note that traffic from Ethiopia into Upper Nile State can move payloads of 45MT per truck.

 

Axle Load Limits

South Sudan

Kenya

Uganda

Truck with 2 Axles

No Limits

18,000

18,000

Truck with 3 Axles

No Limits

24,000

24,000

Truck with 4 Axles

No Limits

28,000

30,000

Semi-trailer with 3 Axles

No Limits

28,000

28,000

Semi-trailer with 4 Axles

No Limits

34,000

32,000

Semi-trailer with 5 Axles

No Limits

42,000

40,000

Semi-trailer with 6 Axles

No Limits

48,000

48,000

Truck & Drawbar Trailer with 4 Axles

No Limits

36,000

38,000

Truck & Drawbar Trailer with 5 Axles

No Limits

42,000

42,000

Truck & Drawbar Trailer with 6 Axles

No Limits

48,000

50,000

Truck & Drawbar Trailer with 7 Axles

No Limits

54,000

56,000

Road Class and Surface Conditions

For more information on the road conditions follow this link to the access constraint maps which are updated every week: https://logcluster.org/en/document/south-sudan-access-constraints-map-16-october-2023

 

South Sudan, Republic of - 2.4 Railway Assessment

South Sudan does not have an extensive rail system and current rail infrastructure, which was constructed between 1959-1962, and what has been left over from the previous Sudan government is in severe disrepair. In 2010, the track was rehabilitated through the MDTF’s US$48.5 million National Emergency Transport Project (NETREP) to revitalise the sector and increase cargo and passenger transport capacity in the area. However, current rail operations have been suspended due to border closures, unserviceable equipment, a lack of capacity, and non-operational rolling stock.


The single, 1067 mm (3’6”) gauge, 446km rail connection linking Babanusa in North Sudan to Wau in South Sudan forms part of a rail transport corridor that extends up to Port Sudan and forms a vital transportation link into South Sudan’s Northern and Western Bar El Ghazal states with a 248km link from the border to the significant towns of Aweil and Wau. Regionally, however, there has been a shift towards road transport due to the relatively high rail tariff costs, unreliable service, unavailability of adequate assets and general poor management.


When reopened, and rail capacity is fully realised, the railway line could serve as a vital part of the domestic transport system, and even though the government has indicated the desire to revitalise and extend the network, the current emphasis is on the expansion of the road network and any transport costs will, for the foreseeable future, be constrained by road competition.

For more information on government contact details, please see the following link: 4.1 Government Contact List here.

Travel Time Matrix

n/a

Railway Companies and Consortia

No railway companies or consortia are currently operating in South Sudan. Historically, railway companies were owned and operated from Sudan through the Sudan Railways Corporation. When the line is reopened, the SRC is the most likely company to continue services along this route. 

Capacity Table

Rail Operator Capacity

 

Sudan Railway Corporation

Lines Operates On

All (4578km)

Max Train Length and / or Pulling Capacity

n/a

Locomotives

Diesel (130 Mainline, 54 shunting)

Covered Freight Wagons Size (m)

4781(mixed)

Flatbed Freight Wagons Size (m)

n/a

High-sided Freight Wagons Size (m)

n/a

Drop-side Freight Wagons Size (m)

n/a

Key Route Information

 

Babanusa-Rumaker (South Sudan Border)

Rumaker-Aweil

Aweil-Wau

Track Gauge

Single Gauge, 1067 mm (3’6”)

Single Gauge, 1067 mm (3’6”)

Single Gauge, 1067 mm (3’6”)

Ruling Gradient

n/a

n/a

n/a

Total Track Distance

Single track: 195.7km

Single Track: 113.7km

Single track: 136.3km

Type of Rail

50 Ib/yard

50 Ib/yard

50 Ib/yard

Type of Sleeper and Fastenings

n/a

n/a

n/a

Total Track Travel Time

n/a

n/a

n/a

Maintenance

Marginal

Bad

Bad

Companies / Consortiums Operating on Line

Sudan Railway Corporation

None

None

Traffic Frequency

n/a

None

None

Security

Marginal

Bad

Bad

Main Stations

Its in Sudan

See below

See below

Key Stations

 

Aweil Station

Wau Station

Location

8.761747, 27.393675

7.718281, 27.982133

Contact Information

Contact Ministry in Juba

Contact Ministry in Juba

Connections with Other

Transport Means

Road and Air

Road and Air

Storage Capacity

(m2 and m3)

None

None

Handling Equipment

None

None

Handling Capacity

n/a

n/a

Other Comments

Station is currently not Operational

Station is currently not Operational

 

South Sudan, Republic of - 2.5 Waterways Assessment

 

 

A large section of the White Nile flows through South Sudan and the country have access to approximately 1400km of navigational waterways stretching from Juba in the south, to Kosti in North Sudan, and from Bentui in the west to Akobo on the Ethiopian border to the east. The river is accessible throughout the year, and during the rainy season the Nile is the only reliable transport link between the southern, central and northern areas of the country. Many of the rivers tributaries are also navigable, however these are only considered passable during the rainy reason.

Although navigational throughout the year, water levels fluctuate during the rainy and dry seasons. In some areas this results in the reduced cargo carrying capacity of barges with barge operators loading vessels according to seasonal draft and clearance requirements. Standard barges take around 400mt but at times during the dry season and in some sections such as between Juba-Bor, the river is only navigable with 300mt. Various barge operators and powerboat owner-operators provide transport services along the length of the river, with the major ports of Mangalla, Bor, Shambe, Adok, Malakal and Renk easily accessible. The majority of river ports are nothing more than an easily accessible riverbank from which porters can load and offload cargo. Loading and offloading facilities, including access to equipment remain problematic.

Passenger transport along the river has not been fully developed. There are no dedicated passenger barges operating along the river and passenger transport is mostly done through powerboats, and allocated space on cargo barges. The development of infrastructure along the river has in recent times largely been the domain of private operators and other commercial companies who have constructed, or are in the planning phases, of constructing their own supply bases with direct access to the water with dedicated equipment and storage solutions. 

Company Information

Historically barge and boat operations were characterized by state run agencies managed by Sudan. The largest barge companies currently operating on South Sudan waterways are MINCO Limited, Nile Barges for River Transport Co, Keer Marine Co and the South Sudan Trans Nile Company.

For information on South Sudan Waterways contact details, please see the following link: 

4.2.3 South Sudan Port and Waterways Company Contact List

Passenger Carrying Capacity

Passenger transport along the river has not been fully developed. There are no dedicated passenger barges operating along the river and passenger transport is mostly done through powerboats, and allocated space on cargo barges.

Key Routes

Key Route Information

 

From: Juba     

To: Kosti

From: Malakal       

To: Akobo

Total Distance (km) 1436km 500km

Width (m):

n/a n/a

River Flow

(m³ / second)

Peak river flow of the upper White Nile Basin above Malakal occurs between July and December.

The average flow is approximately 924 m3/s with an average peak of approximately 1218 m3/s and a minimum average flow of 609 m3/s. 

The Sobat river is one of the biggest tributaries of the White Nile with an average flow of 412 m3/s,

and an average peak and minimum flow of 680 m3/s and 99 m3/s respectively. 

Seasonal Affects Low water levels during the dry season between the Juba-Bor section affects barge cargo capacity Low water levels during the dry season between the Juba-Bor section affects barge cargo capacity

Maximum Weight and

Size of Vessels

Standard 400mt barge  Barge and boat services

Regular Traffic

Passenger / Cargo

Passenger and cargo Passenger and cargo

Companies Operating

Along the Route

KEER Marine Co.

Nile Barges for River Transport Co. Ltd

MINCO Ltd

South Sudan Trans Nile Company

KEER Marine Co.

Nile Barges for River Transport Co. Ltd

MINCO Ltd

South Sudan Trans Nile Company

Security Concerns

(Yes / No)

Yes, various security checkpoints are present along this route and operators occasionally

make use of national security personnel on barges to help navigate such areas. 

Yes
Main Ports Mangalla, Bor, Shambe, Adok, Malakal and Renk Malakal, Nasser, Akobo

Port Information

Key Port Information
  Bor Port Malakal Port
Location

06°12'15.37"N

31°33'11.03"E

N 09° 31’ 35.00”

E 31° 39’ 02.00”

Contact Information

n/a Bol Gordon – Port Manager - +211 (0) 955444412

Connections with other

transport means

(road/waterways/air)

Road (State and Interstate) and air (Bor Airport) Road (State and Interstate) and air (Malakal Airport)

Storage Capacity

(square meters and cubic meters)

None None
Handling Equipment None None

Customs Clearance Available

(Yes / No)

No None
Other Comments Bor port is comprised of an easily accessible riverbank where barges can dock to load and offload cargo. An additional docking area is available a short distance upstream and WFP also have a floating jetty adjacent to its warehouses approximately 11km up stream. There are no warehousing or cargo handling equipment available on site and mobile cranes have to be hired in. 

Malakal Port has a concrete pier of approx. 300 m in length. Porters unload barges but mobile cranes are available from private operators. The porters are organized and unloading/loading fees must be negotiated. Fuel is available at the port from commercial suppliers. Malakal is an important port due to its geographical location. Humanitarian goods offloaded at Malakal can be transshipped at onto smaller vessels, which can then use the White Nile tributaries to reach points east and west of the main river.

  • The Sobat corridor – stretches between Malakal and Nassir;
  • The Zeraf River – this route is seasonal
  • The River Bahr el Ghazal route – reaches from Malakal to Bentui;
  • The River Jur – can extend up to Wau

For information on South Sudan additional waterways information, please see the following links:

White Nile River Cargo Transport Assessment

Malakal Melut River Assessment Report

Nile River Common Transport Service Snapshot

South Sudan, Republic of - 2.6 Storage Assessment

Storage facilities in South Sudan play a vital role in various sectors, including agriculture, manufacturing, and logistics. However, the country faces several challenges regarding storage capacity and infrastructure.

Current Capacity and Bottlenecks: South Sudan's storage capacity is often inadequate to meet the current needs of the population. Insufficient storage facilities can result in post-harvest losses in the agricultural sector and difficulties in storing goods for longer periods. The lack of proper storage infrastructure also affects the availability and affordability of essential commodities for the population.

One key bottleneck is the limited availability of cold storage facilities, which impacts the storage of perishable goods such as fruits, vegetables, and dairy products. This constraint hinders the development of value chains for these products and limits their market reach.

National Storage Infrastructure: South Sudan's national storage infrastructure is still in the early stages of development. The country lacks a well-established and reliable network of warehouses, silos, and cold storage facilities. This poses significant challenges for businesses and farmers in safely storing their products and preventing spoilage.

Accessibility and Reliability: Reliable storage facilities in South Sudan can be difficult to locate, especially in remote or rural areas. Lack of proper infrastructure, including roads and transportation systems, hampers the efficient movement of goods to and from storage facilities. This can result in delays and added costs for businesses and farmers.

Additionally, the limited availability of electricity and unreliable power supply further complicates the storage situation. Proper temperature control, especially for perishable goods, becomes challenging without consistent and reliable electricity.

Efforts are being made to address these challenges and improve storage infrastructure in South Sudan. The government and international organizations are investing in the construction and rehabilitation of storage facilities, including warehouses and silos. However, more must be done to expand storage capacity and enhance accessibility, particularly in rural areas, to support the country's economic development and food security goals.

For more information on storage company contact details, please see the following link: 4.6 Storage and Milling Companies Contact List.

Commercial Storage

There is a lack of permanent storage capacity in South Sudan, and most storage solutions are provided through temporary and mobile storage units. The humanitarian community constitutes the largest sector with available warehouse space, and most organisations have storage facilities in Juba and most other major towns.

The commercial sector has taken advantage of this gap, and an ever-growing number of warehouses are present in major towns. Cold Chain remains problematic, with the capital outlay and risks associated with such endeavours limiting growth in this sector. Several commercial operators, however, are currently developing their capacity to provide a complete cold chain solution. 

Location

Owner

Available for Rent

Capacity

(MT / m² / m³)

Type [1]

Access [2]

Condition [3]

   

Yes / No

       
             

Juba-Lologo

Warehousing Logistics Company

No

13 Acres used by NGOs, 4 Acres open area available for rent

Concrete, Rub halls, Cold rooms

Good

Good

Juba Airport

Jebel Aviation Logistics

Yes

1200SqM

Concrete

Good

Good

Juba

YATCO International Company Ltd

Yes

17,000Sq.M

Concrete

Good

Good

Wau

Rose Company Ltd

Yes

4000mt

Concrete

Flat

Appears intact

Wau

Baraka Company Ltd

Yes

1700mt

Concrete

Flat

 

Appears Intact

Juba

Jubilant Ventures

Yes

10,600m2

Concrete

Good

Good

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

[1] Warehouse Type: Open storage, container, rub-hall, silo, concrete, other, unspecified

[2] Warehouse Access: Raised-siding, flat

[3] Warehouse condition: Appears intact, appears damaged, under construction/repair

Storage Used by Humanitarian Organizations

All major humanitarian organisations have access to storage facilities, and warehouse management is mostly conducted in-house. Many organisations also make use of commercial storage. In smaller locations and where the presence and size of humanitarian actors vary, it is common for organisations to share storage space. Sometimes, smaller organisations rely almost entirely on other organisations for storage.

Through the common storage service, the Logistics Cluster has access to more than 6,700m2 of warehouse space in more than 19 locations nationwide. This storage space is made available to the humanitarian community to augment their current capacity or to serve as dedicated storage space on a short-term basis.

Location

Organization

Sharing Possibility

Capacity

(MT / m² / m³)

Type [1]

Access [2]

Condition [3]

   

Yes / No

       

Yei

AAH

No

620m2

Concrete

Good

Good

Yei

ACROSS

Yes

240m2

Rub Hall

Good

Good

Yei

N/A

Yei

320m2

Rub Hall

Good

Good

Yei

Caritas International

No

240m2

Rub Hall

Good

Damaged skins

Malakal Log Base

UNHCR/AAH

No

1280m2

Rub Hall

Good

Appears intact

Malakal Log Base

WHO

Yes

320m2

Rub Hall

Raised siding

Appears intact

Malakal Log Base

MSF

No

960m2

Rub Hall

Raised siding

Appears intact

Malakal

ICRC

No

320m2

Rub Hall

Raised siding

Appears intact

Malakal Log Base

UNICEF

No

1600m2

Rub Hall

Raised siding

Appears intact

Malakal Log Base

Solidarites International

Yes

320m2

Rub Hall

Raised siding

Appears intact

Malakal Log Base

IOM

No

2880m2

Rub Hall

Raised siding

Appears intact

Malakal Log Base

DRC

No

320m2

Rub Hall

Raised siding

Appears intact

Malakal Log Base

IMC

No

1280m2

Rub Hall

Raised siding

Appears intact

Malakal Log Base

WVI

No

640m2

Rub Hall

Raised siding

Appears intact

Obay

WVI

No

52m2

Rub Hall

Raised siding

Appears intact

Addidiang

WVI

No

52m2

Rub Hall

Raised siding

Appears intact

Kodok

WVI

Yes

320m2

Rub Hall

Raised siding

Appears damaged

Kodok

HDC/DRC

Yes

28m2

Unspecified

Raised siding

Appears intact

Kodok

IOM

No

20m2

Unspecified

Raised siding

Appears intact

Nyal

UNIDOR

No

48m2

Rub Hall

Flat

Good

Wau

Unicef

No

600mt

Rub Hall

Flat

Appears intact

Wau

ZOA-DORCAS

No

50mt

Concrete

Flat

Appears intact

Wau

CARDO

Yes

20mt

Concrete

Flat

Appears intact

Bor

UNHCR

No

768m2

Rub Hall

Flat

Appears intact

Bor

South Sudan Red Cross

No

384m2

Rub Hall

Flat

Appears intact

Bor

South Sudan Red Cross

No

140mt

Concrete

Raised

Appears intact

Bor

Save The Children International

Yes

768m2

Rub Hall

Flat

Appears intact

Bor

CRS

No

384m2

Rub Hall

Flat

Appears intact

Akobo

CRS

No

384m2

Rub Hall

Flat

Appears intact

Padiet

CRS

Yes

384m2

Rub Hall

Flat

Appears intact

Pibor

CRS

No

384m2

Rub Hall

Flat

Appears intact

Pajut

CRS

No

768m2

Rub Hall

Flat

Appears intact

Poktap

CRS

No

384m2

Rub Hall

Flat

Appears intact

Pathai

CRS

No

384m2

Rub Hall

Flat

Appears Damaged

Bor

NRC

Yes

384m2

Rub Hall

Flat

Appears intact

Bor

UNICEF

No

2240m2

Rub Hall

Flat

Appears intact

Bor

UNFAO

No

1056m2

Rub Hall

Raised siding

Appears intact

Bor

IOM

No

1760m2

Rub Hall

Flat

Appears intact

Maridi

ACTED

Yes

320m2

Rub Hall

Flat

Good

Yambio

WFP

No

102

Baby MSU

Raised siding

Good

Rumbek

IRC

No

240

Rub Hall

Raised siding

Good

Rumbek

Unicef

Yes

640m2

Rub Hall

Raised Siding

Good

Rumbek

Oxfam GB

No

480m2

Rub Hall

Raised

Good

Wau

WFP-LC

Yes

440m2

Rub hall

Raised

Good

Ngisha

ALIMA

No

240m2

Rub Hall

Flat

Good

Manajang

HFO

No

52m2

Baby MSU

Raised

Good

Nyamlel

World Concern Development Organisation

No

52m2

Baby MSU

Raised

Good

Majak Bol (Akon North)

Dorcas Aid International

Yes

240m2

Rub Hall

Raised

Good

Tonj South (Tonj Town)

CCM

Yes

240m2

Rub Hall

Raised

Good

Tonj North (Warrap Town)

TORCH

Yes

240m2

Rub Hall

Raised

Good

Yida

Samaritan’s Purse (SP)

Yes

320m2

Rub Hall

Raise

Good

Nyal

IRC

Yes

320m2

Rub Hall

Raised

Good

 

Nyal

Mercy Corps

Yes

320m2

Rub Hall

Raised

Good

Leer

MSF-Holland

No

240m2

Rub Hall

Raised

Good

Leer

UNIDOR

Yes

240m2

Rub Hall

Raised

Good

Leer

CFH

Yes

240m2

Rub Hall

Raised

Good

Koch

World Relief

Yes

320m2

Rub Hall

Raised

Good

Keew

HFO

Yes

52m2

Baby MSU

Raised

Good

             

Ganyiel

Mercy Corps

     Yes

320m2

Rub Hall

Raised

Good

Bentiu Log Base

WFP-LC

     Yes

240m2

Rub Hall

Raised

Good

Bentiu Log Base

UNHCR

   No

240m2

Rub Hall

Raised

Good

Bentiu Log Base

IRC

  Yes

240m2

Rub Hall

Raised

Good

Bentiu Log Base

Mercy Corps International

    Yes

240m2

Rub Hall

Raised

Good

Bentiu Log Base

World Relief

  Yes

240m2

Rub Hall

Raised

Good

Bentiu Log Base

WHH

   Yes

240m2

Rub Hall

Raised

Good

Bentiu Log Base

Concern Worldwide

    Yes

240m2

Rub Hall

Raised

Good

Maban

Cordaid

    Yes

320m2

Rub Hall

Raised

Good

Aburoc

Solidarites International (SI)

   Yes

320m2

Rub Hall

Raised

Good

Pochalla

Tearfund

    Yes

240m2

Rub Hall

Raised

Good

Renk

WFP

    No

320m2

Rub Hall

Raised

Good

Pibor

ACROSS

   Yes

320m2

Rub Hall

Raised

Good

Pibor

CRS

     Yes

320m2

Rub Hall

Raised

Good

Pibor

Peace Corps International (PCO)

 Yes

320m2

Rub Hall

Raised

Good

New Fangak

World Relief

  Yes

320m2

Rub Hall

Raised

Good

Motot

Tearfund

  Yes

320m2

Rub Hall

Raised

Good

Mabior

Tearfund

   Yes

240m2

Rub Hall

Raised

Good

Lankien

MSF Holland

   No

240m2

Rub Hall

Raised

Good

Duk Pajut

Sudan Medical Care (SMC)

   No

52m2

Rub Hall

Raised

Good

Bor

WFP-LC

 Yes

1760m2

Rub Hall

Raised

Good

Ayod

EDA

  Yes

240m2

Rub Hall

Raised

Good

Akobo

Save the Children International

  Yes

480m2

Rub Hall

Raised

Good

Akobo

Nile Hope

  Yes

240m2

Rub Hall

Raised

Good

Kapoeta

Save the Children International (SCI)

   Yes

320m2

Rub Hall

Raised

Good

Nimule

Cordaid

  Yes

320m2

Rub Hall

Raised

Good

Torit

SCI

   Yes

200m2

Rub Hall

Raised

Good

Torit

Norwegian Church Aid (NCA)

   Yes

240m2

Rub Hall

Raised

Good

Juba

Tearfund

    No

320m2

Rub Hall

Raised

Good

Juba

WHO

    No

320m2

Rub Hall

Raised

Good

Juba

IOM

    No

4 acres of Land

With Open storage, Rub Halls for their sole use

Raised

Good

Mingkaman

WFP

No

7,500mt

Rub Hall

Raised

Good

Bentiu Log Base

MSF

No

720m2

Rub Hall

Raised

Good

Bentiu Log Base

CWW

No

2160m2

Rub Hall

Raised

Good

Bentiu Log Base

IOM

No

1440m2

Rub Hall

Raised

Good

Din Din

NRC/WFP CP

No

1000m2

Rub Hall

Raised

Good

Padeah

NRC/WFP CP

No

1500m2

Rub Hall

Raised

Good

Thonyor

NRC/WFP CP

No

2000m2

Rub Hall

Raised

Good

Leer Town

NRC/WFP CP

No

1500m2

Rub Hall

Raised

Good

MirMir

NRC/WFP CP

No

1000m2

Rub Hall

Raised

Good

Koch

NRC/WFP CP

No

1000m2

Rub Hall

Raised

Good

Koch

CARE/WFP CP

No

320m2

Rub Hall

Raised

Good

Thaker

Samaritan Purse/WFP CP

No

1500m2

Rub Hall

Raised

Good

Rupkuai

Samaritan Purse/WFP CP

No

1000m2

Rub Hall

Raised

Good

Abyei

IOM

Yes

240 m²

Rex hall

Good

Good

Abyei

FAO

yes

320 m²

Wiikhall

Good

Good

Abyei

WFP

yes

3200 m²

O.B.WiiK

Good

Good

Abyei / Mijak

WFP/ACAD

Yes

240 m

O.B.WiiK

Seasonally

Good

Abyei / Abathok

WFP/ACAD

yes

560 m²

O.B.WiiK

Good

Good

Abyei / Awal

WFP / ACAD

yes

240 m²

O.B.WiiK

Seasonally

Good

Abyei / Rummamier

WFP / ACAD

yes

640 m²

O.B.WiiK

Seasonally

Good

Abyei

MSF Switzerland

no

960 m²

WG Hall 2

Good

Good

Mayom

NRC

No

2400m2

Rub Hall

Good

Good

Mankien

NRC

No

1280 m2

MSU

Good

Good

Mayom

CARE International

No

432 m2

MSU

Good

Good

Mayom

SP

No

1600m2

Temporary store

Good

Good

PIBOR

UNICEF

No

800mt

MSU

-

Good

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

[1] Warehouse Type: Open storage, container, rub-hall, silo, concrete, other, unspecified

[2] Warehouse Access: Raised-siding, flat

[3] Warehouse condition: Appears intact, appears damaged, under construction/repair

Public Sector Storage

The government has access to several warehouse facilities however these facilities are not readily made available to the humanitarian community. In some instances, the government can provide or allocate storage space to the humanitarian community; however, access to this space needs to be negotiated directly with the relevant line ministry.  Additional storage space can also be negotiated for through the Relief and Rehabilitation Commission for those organisations involved in emergency response. 

Location

Ministry / Agency

Use Possibility

Capacity

(MT / m² / m³)

Type [1]

Access [2]

Condition [3]

   

Yes / No

       

Yei

Yei County Authority

No

620m2

Concrete

Good

Good

Yei

Ministry of Agriculture

No

300m2

Semi-permanent structure

Good

Not good

Yei

Ministry of Cooperative

Yes

200m2

Concrete

Good

Good

Kapoeta South

Government

Yes

600mt

Concrete

Raised siding

Appears intact

Kapoeta North

Government

Yes

600mt

Concrete

Raised siding

Appears intact

Kapoeta

Ministry of Health

No

25mt

Concrete

Raised siding

Appears intact

Kapoeta South

Government

Yes

600mt

Concrete

Raised siding

Appears intact

Kuajok-Block 9

State Government stores

Yes

12,000mt

Concrete Building

Good

Good

Tonj Town

State Government Store

Yes

1,000mt

Concrete Building

Good

Good

             

[1] Warehouse Type: Open storage, container, rub-hall, silo, concrete, other, unspecified

[2] Warehouse Access: Raised-siding, flat

[3] Warehouse condition: Appears intact, appears damaged, under construction/repair

Cold Chain

Cold Chain remains problematic with the capital outlay and risks associated with such endeavours limiting growth in this sector. Several commercial operators however are currently developing their capacity to provide a complete cold chain solution.

Location

Organization / Owner

Type [1]

Cooling /  Power [2]

Quantity

Total Capacity

(m³)

Condition

             

Malakal Log Base

Unicef

Freezers

Solar

2

30m3

In Good condition

Malakal Log Base

IMC

Freezers

Solar

5

75m3

In Good condition

Malakal Log Base

IOM

Freezers

Solar

4

60m3

In Good condition

Kapoeta

Ministry of Health state

Solar direct drive vaccine Refrigerator & icepack freezer – TCW 2000SSD

320C/ 50C

2

99 L

Storage facility is concrete and Cooling room positive, freezer, solar powered

Kapoeta

Ministry of Health State

Solar direct drive vaccine Refrigerator & icepack freezer – TCW 4000SSD

430C/50C

2

440L

Storage facility is concrete and Cooling room postive, freezer, solar powered.

             

 

[1] Cold Room Positive, Cold Room Negative, Refrigerator, Freezer,

[2] Compression, Absorption, Solar, Other, unspecified

 

South Sudan, Republic of - 2.7 Milling Assessment

There are no large-scale milling operations currently active in South Sudan, and the industry is characterised by small-scale owner-operators utilising small-capacity milling machinery. Milling facilities are available in major towns and villages. Still, these machines are privately owned, and milling rates are negotiated on a case-by-case basis, with market prices fluctuating depending on the exchange rate. The average capacity of available milling machines ranges from 100kg to 450kg per hour. For large-scale milling operations, it is more cost-effective to Mill in neighbouring countries such as Kenya and Uganda, where large-scale milling facilities are available. 

For more information on milling company contact details, please see the following link: 4.6 Storage and Milling Companies Contact List.

 

South Sudan, Republic of - 3 Logistics Services

Since independence the market of service providers have expanded exponentially with both national and international companies providing a host of support services. As in other business sectors, domestic operators and service providers have also seen significant growth and the government is actively encouraging the development of local ownership. However the growth in this sector and the quality of the services provided is constrained by a shortage of specialised skills in the local labour market and the perceived difficulty of doing business in South Sudan.  

Disclaimer: Registration does not imply any business relationship between the supplier and WFP / Logistics Cluster, and is used solely as a determinant of services, and capacities.

Please note: WFP / Logistics Cluster maintain complete impartiality and are not in a position to endorse, comment on any company's suitability as a reputable service provider.

 

South Sudan, Republic of - 3.1 Fuel

Fuel Overview

Fuel provision in South Sudan faces significant challenges in terms of supply and storage. The country heavily relies on imported petroleum products due to limited domestic refining capacity. Logistical constraints, including inadequate infrastructure, insecurity, and political instability, often disrupt supply chains. This results in frequent fuel shortages and price fluctuations. Moreover, storage facilities are insufficient and poorly maintained, leading to limited capacity and potential fuel quality issues. These challenges highlight the need for investment in infrastructure development, efficient supply management, and strategic storage facilities to ensure a more reliable and sustainable fuel provision system in South Sudan.

Both government distributors and private companies provide fuel in South Sudan. The national oil company, Nile Petroleum Corporation (Nilepet), plays a significant role in fuel provision as the main government distributor. It has a monopoly over oil exploration, production, and distribution in the country. Additionally, there are several private companies involved in the fuel sector, including Trinity Energy, Petronas, and Sahara Energy, which import and distribute petroleum products. These private companies operate through partnerships with international oil companies and contribute to the overall fuel supply in South Sudan. However, the sector is still evolving, and efforts are being made to promote competition, attract investment, and improve the efficiency of fuel supply and distribution in the country.

Fuel supply in South Sudan has been a significant challenge, both currently and historically. South Sudan heavily depends on fuel imports due to limited internal production capacity. Most fuel arrives from neighbouring countries such as Sudan, Uganda, and Kenya. However, political instability, conflicts, and logistical constraints have often disrupted fuel supply chains, causing shortages and price fluctuations. Internal production has been hampered by infrastructure constraints, lack of investment, and technical expertise. The country's landlocked geography further complicates fuel transportation, increasing costs and vulnerability to disruptions. These fuel supply issues have had adverse effects on various sectors of the economy, including transportation, agriculture, and power generation, impacting the livelihoods of the population.

For more information on government and fuel provider contact details, please see the following links: 4.1 Government Contact List and 4.7 Fuel Providers Contact List.

Information may also be found at: http://www.mytravelcost.com/petrol-prices/ which is updated monthly. 

Fuel Pricing

The fuel price in South Sudan is determined by various factors, including international crude oil prices, transportation costs, taxes, and government policies. The government heavily regulates the fuel sector and sets the retail price through the Ministry of Petroleum and Mining. The pricing formula considers the cost of importing or refining fuel, transportation costs, distribution margins, and taxes.

Government policies and taxes play a significant role in fuel pricing in South Sudan. The government imposes a fuel tax, a percentage of the retail price, to generate revenue. Additionally, there may be other levies and fees imposed by the government, such as customs duties and fuel subsidies. These policies and taxes influence the final fuel price and can lead to price fluctuations.

It is worth noting that the government has sometimes intervened to stabilize fuel prices during times of crisis or to mitigate social unrest. However, these interventions may have unintended consequences and can strain the fiscal resources of the government. Overall, government policies and taxes have a direct impact on the pricing of fuel in South Sudan, and any changes in these policies can have significant implications for the fuel market and the economy.

Seasonal Variations 

Yes, there are seasonal variations in fuel supply and management in South Sudan. During the rainy season, which typically lasts from May to November, the transportation infrastructure becomes more challenging due to flooded roads and impassable routes. This can disrupt the supply chain and hinder fuel delivery to various regions of the country. Additionally, agricultural activities such as harvesting and transporting crops during certain seasons may increase the demand for fuel, putting additional strain on the already limited supply. To manage these seasonal variations, the government and fuel suppliers often need to plan, stockpile fuel, and ensure alternative transportation methods are in place to address the logistical challenges during the rainy season.

Seasonal Variations

Are there national priorities in the availability of fuel? (i.e. are there restrictions or priorities for the provision of fuel such as to the military?)

No

Is there a rationing system?

No

Is fuel to lower income / vulnerable groups subsidized?

No

Can the local industry expand fuel supply to meet humanitarian needs?

Yes, However, a sudden and prolonged surge in demand would be problematic and given the length of the supply chain.

It is highly unlikely that South Sudanese fuel suppliers would be able to meet the surge in demand for extended periods of time.

Is it possible for a humanitarian organization to directly contract a reputable supplier / distributor to provide its fuel needs?

Yes, various suppliers with direct access to fuel refineries is operating within South Sudan.

Fuel Transportation

The internal fuel transport in South Sudan is primarily carried out through road and river transportation. Fuel is transported in tanker trucks over long distances to various regions of the country, and in some cases, it is transported via river barges. However, there are significant constraints and bottlenecks that exist in the internal transport of fuel. The country's infrastructure, including roads and bridges, is often inadequate and poorly maintained, making transportation challenging and prone to delays. This, coupled with security concerns and the seasonal variations in road conditions, hampers the efficient and timely delivery of fuel. Moreover, the limited capacity of storage facilities and the lack of strategic reserves further exacerbate the challenges in meeting local fuel needs and potential increases in demand from the humanitarian community. Addressing these constraints and investing in infrastructure development would be crucial to improving the internal transport of fuel and ensuring a reliable supply to meet both local and humanitarian demands in South Sudan.

Standards, Quality and Testing

In South Sudan, ensuring fuel quality standards and enforcing them is an important aspect of the fuel sector. The Ministry of Petroleum and Mining is responsible for setting and monitoring these standards to ensure that the fuel being supplied meets the required specifications. These standards typically cover parameters such as octane or cetane rating, sulfur content, density, and other quality indicators. The ministry collaborates with relevant stakeholders, including fuel suppliers and importers, to ensure compliance with these standards.

As for enforcing fuel quality standards, the government conducts inspections and monitoring activities to verify the quality of fuel sold in the market. This includes conducting random sampling and testing fuel samples to check if they meet the prescribed standards. If any deviations or violations are found, appropriate actions may be taken, such as fines, penalties, or even suspensions.

Regarding national testing laboratories, South Sudan faces challenges establishing and maintaining such facilities. While efforts have been made in the past to set up national testing laboratories, the progress has been limited. As a result, the country often relies on external laboratories or regional testing facilities to carry out the necessary fuel quality testing. Establishing a well-equipped national testing laboratory would be beneficial in ensuring more efficient and timely monitoring and enforcement of fuel quality standards in South Sudan.

Industry Control Measures

Do tanks have adequate protection against water mixing with the fuel?

Yes, only large suppliers can adequately provide this capacity.

Are there filters in the system which monitor where fuel is loaded into aircraft?

Yes, major fuel suppliers have filter systems in place both at fuel storage units and on fuel trucks ensure water and particulate filtration.

Is there adequate epoxy coating of tanks on trucks?

No, only major fuel suppliers have adequate protection.

Is there a presence of suitable firefighting equipment?

Yes, only large suppliers can realistically provide acceptable fire fighting systems and adhere to international standards.

 

Standards Authority

Is there a national or regional standards authority?

Yes

If yes, please identify the appropriate national and/or regional authority.

National:SSNS

Regional:TBC

If yes, are the standards adequate/properly enforced?

No

 

Testing Laboratories

Are there national testing laboratories?

No

 

Disclaimer: Inclusion of company information in the LCA does not imply any business relationship between the supplier and WFP / Logistics Cluster, and is used solely as a determinant of services, and capacities.

Please note: WFP / Logistics Cluster maintain complete impartiality and are not in a position to endorse, comment on any company's suitability as a reputable service provider.

 

South Sudan, Republic of - 3.2 Transporters

The demand for road freight transport has grown significantly since independence. The result is that many local and foreign-owned transport providers have entered the market with various capacities and services to offer. This sector is characterized by small to medium-sized vehicle fleets and vehicles of differing capacities and maintenance levels. Larger transport providers can offer full transport services and operate in neighbouring countries.


In general, road freight transport companies range from small to medium-sized operations with access to additional fleet capacity through owner-operator vehicles. Most operators can operate throughout the country; however, in some instances, such as during the rainy season or in areas posing a potential security risk, the transporter can refuse to travel or increase transport costs.


The road freight transport sector can meet the current demand of the humanitarian community, and foreign operators are allowed to operate domestically on the condition that companies are registered. As with other business sectors, the government actively encourages local development and ownership and, in some instances, requires local shareholders in foreign-owned companies. 

For more information on transport company contact details, please see the following link: 4.8 Transporter Contact List.

 

Lucky Q General Trading Co. ltd -Total Capacity 2040mt

Regions Covered

Wau, Aweil, Rumbek and Juba

Vehicle Type

Number of

Vehicles

Capacity per

Vehicle (MT)

Comments / Condition of Vehicles

Semi-Trailers

51

40

Operational and the Company have Workshop in Juba and Wau with Mechanics

Total Capacity

51

2040mt

 

 

Save Logistics Co. Ltd- Capacity summary 1200mt

Regions Covered

Wau, Rumbek and Juba

Vehicle Type

Number of

Vehicles

Capacity per

Vehicle (MT)

Comments / Condition of Vehicles

Semi-Trailer

30

40

Good condition and workshop available in Wau

Total Capacity

30

1200 mt

 

 

 

Nileen Investment Co. Ltd - Capacity summary 90mt

Regions Covered

Western Bahr Ghazal Wau

Vehicle Type

Number of

Vehicles

Capacity per

Vehicle (MT)

Comments / Condition of Vehicles

Hino

5

18

Good condition and with No workshop

Total Capacity

5

90 mt

 

 

S-Cubics (S3) Transporters and Construction Co. Ltd- Capacity-1800mt

Regions Covered

Wau, Bentiu, Bor and Juba

Vehicle Type

Number of

Vehicles

Capacity per

Vehicle (MT)

Comments / Condition of Vehicles

Semi-Trailer

45

40

Good condition and workshop available in Wau

Total Capacity

45

1800mt

 

 

Youkway Trading and Investment, Construction Co. Ltd - Capacity 950mt

Regions Covered

Western Bahr El Ghazal, Wau and Juba

Vehicle Type

Number of

Vehicles

Capacity per

Vehicle (MT)

Comments / Condition of Vehicles

Semi-Trailer

20

40

Good condition and workshop available in Wau and Juba

Atross

2

75

Good condition and workshop available in Wau and Juba

Total Capacity

22

950mt

 

 

Barka Transport & General Trading Co. Ltd Capacity summary 880mt

Regions Covered

Wau, Bentiu and Juba

Vehicle Type

Number of

Vehicles

Capacity per

Vehicle (MT)

Comments / Condition of Vehicles

Semi-Trailer

22

40

Good condition and workshop available in Wau and Juba

Total Capacity

22

880mt

 

 

Bouch Transportation Co. Ltd - Capacity summary 1180mt

Regions Covered

Wau, Rumbek and Aweil

Vehicle Type

Number of

Vehicles

Capacity per

Vehicle (MT)

Comments / Condition of Vehicles

Semi-Trailer

1

30

Good condition and workshop available in Wau

Scania (Trailer)

2

50

Good condition and workshop available in Wau

IVECO

25

20

Good condition and workshop available in Wau

Hino

22

25

Good condition and workshop available in Wau

Total Capacity

50

1180mt

 

 

Mbili for Transport & Construction Co. Ltd Capacity summary 80mt

Regions Covered

Wau and Western Bahr El Ghazal Region

Vehicle Type

Number of

Vehicles

Capacity per

Vehicle (MT)

Comments / Condition of Vehicles

Hino Trucks

4

20

Good condition and available in Wau

Total Capacity

4

80mt

 

 

One Way Logistics Co. Ltd - Capacity summary 400mt

Regions Covered

Wau and Western Bahr El Ghazal Region

Vehicle Type

Number of

Vehicles

Capacity per

Vehicle (MT)

Comments / Condition of Vehicles

Semi-Trailer

10

40

Good condition and workshop available in Wau

Total Capacity

10

400mt

 

 

Naro Transportation & Trade Co. Ltd Capacity summary 129.5mt

Regions Covered

Wau and Western Bahr El Ghazal Region

Vehicle Type

Number of

Vehicles

Capacity per

Vehicle (MT)

Comments / Condition of Vehicles

Hino

7

18.5

Good condition and workshop available in Wau

Total Capacity

7

129.5mt

 

 

Pobeda Investment Co. Ltd Capacity summary 175mt

Regions Covered

Wau and Western Bahr El Ghazal Region

Vehicle Type

Number of

Vehicles

Capacity per

Vehicle (MT)

Comments / Condition of Vehicles

Hino Truck

7

25

Good condition and workshop available in Wau

Total Capacity

7

175mt

 

 

MHDMFSA General Trading Co. Ltd - Capacity summary 100mt

Regions Covered

Wau and Western Bahr El Ghazal Region

Vehicle Type

Number of

Vehicles

Capacity per

Vehicle (MT)

Comments / Condition of Vehicles

Hino Truck

4

25

Good condition and workshop available in Wau

Total Capacity

4

100mt

 

 

Rose Co. Ltd Capacity summary 100mt

Regions Covered

Wau and Aweil

Vehicle Type

Number of

Vehicles

Capacity per

Vehicle (MT)

Comments / Condition of Vehicles

Hino Truck

2

25

Good condition and available in Wau

Tipper Truck

2

25

Good condition and available in Wau

Total Capacity

4

100mt

 

 

Bokana General Investment & Construction Co. Ltd Capacity summary 200mt

Regions Covered

Wau and Juba

Vehicle Type

Number of

Vehicles

Capacity per

Vehicle (MT)

Comments / Condition of Vehicles

Trailers

4

50

Good condition and available in Wau and Juba

Total Capacity

4

200mt

 

 

Muna2020 General Trading Co. Ltd Capacity summary 320mt

Regions Covered

Wau and Wunrok

Vehicle Type

Number of

Vehicles

Capacity per

Vehicle (MT)

Comments / Condition of Vehicles

Actross Trucks

8

40x8

Good condition and available in Wau

Total Capacity

8

320mt

 

 

 

Kifmas Co. Ltd Capacity summary 2520mt

Regions Covered

They move to most part of the country apart from Upper Nile region

Vehicle Type

Number of

Vehicles

Capacity per

Vehicle (MT)

Comments / Condition of Vehicles

Semi-Trailer (Actross)

48

40

Roadworthy, good standard conditions

Bully Trucks Actross, AXOR, UD

11

40

Good conditions

Actros & UD

8

20

Well maintenance

Total Capacity

67

2520mt

 

 

Simon For Multipurpose Co. Ltd - Capacity summary 665mt

Regions Covered

Malakal, Melut, Palouch, Renk, Baliet, and Maban

Vehicle Type

Number of

Vehicles

Capacity per

Vehicle (MT)

Comments / Condition of Vehicles

Hino + IVECO

12

25

 Operational and in good condition

Hino-ZS

3

20

Operational and in good condition

IVECO

1

15

Operational and in good condition

Shark

1

50

Operational and in good condition

Benz + IVECO+Man

6

40

Operational and in good condition

Total Capacity

23

665mt

 

 

Gieath Transport Co. Ltd - Capacity summary 192mt

Regions Covered

Upper Nile State (Maban - Renk, Melut and Malakal)

Vehicle Type

Number of

Vehicles

Capacity per

Vehicle (MT)

Comments / Condition of Vehicles

Hino Truck

8

25

Good condition

IVECO

2

35

Good condition

IVECO Truck

2

25

Good condition

Benz

2

40

Good condition

Benz

5

35

Good condition

Total Capacity

19

575mt

 

 

Tonja Transport Co. Ltd - Capacity summary

Regions Covered

They move to most part of the country apart from Upper Nile region

Vehicle Type

Number of

Vehicles

Capacity per

Vehicle (MT)

Comments / Condition of Vehicles

IVECO Truck

1

20

Good condition

Austine Lorries

5

50

Good and operational

Total Capacity

6

270mt

 

 

Naser Mohammed General Service Co. Ltd Capacity summary 15mt trucks

Regions Covered

Within Malakal

Vehicle Type

Number of

Vehicles

Capacity per

Vehicle (MT)

Comments / Condition of Vehicles

N/A

-

15

The Company Have no trucks but once contracted, they will provide 15mt trucks.

Total Capacity

 

15mt

 

 

AMARS Co. Ltd - Capacity summary 1200mt

Regions Covered

Unity State Region

Vehicle Type

Number of

Vehicles

Capacity per

Vehicle (MT)

Comments / Condition of Vehicles

Dumper trucks

60

20

Good condition and available for hire

Total Capacity

60

1200mt

 

 

 

 

Ropani International Ltd - Capacity summary 3760mt

Regions Covered

Juba, and the Western corridor location.

Vehicle Type

Number of

Vehicles

Capacity per

Vehicle (MT)

Comments / Condition of Vehicles

Semi-Trailer

94

40

 All are in Sound condition

Total Capacity

94

3760mt

 

 

Gurmad General Co. Ltd Capacity summary 2100mt

Regions Covered

All Regions with Accessible roads, Ex-Juba to the Western corridor, Greater Equatorial & Unity State Regions

Vehicle Type

Number of

Vehicles

Capacity per

Vehicle (MT)

Comments / Condition of Vehicles

Actros

40

40

In good working condition

Hino

5

20

In good working condition

Isuzu

10

20

In good working condition

Sino

10

20

In good working condition

Total Capacity

65

2100mt

 

 

MALIYAMUNGU EXTRA LTD - Capacity summary 1280mt

Regions Covered

All Regions with Accessible roads, Ex-Juba to the Western corridor, Greater Equatorial & Unity State Regions

Vehicle Type

Number of

Vehicles

Capacity per

Vehicle (MT)

Comments / Condition of Vehicles

6X4

20

40

In good condition

6X6

8

40

In good condition

8x8

4

40

In good condition

Total Capacity

32

1280mt

 

 

Unity Cargo and Supplies Limited- Capacity summary 2040mt

Regions Covered

Juba, Wau, Rumbek, Bentiu, Wunrok, Kwajok, Aweil, Kapoeta, Torit and Bor.

Vehicle Type

Number of

Vehicles

Capacity per

Vehicle (MT)

Comments / Condition of Vehicles

Semi-Trailers

51

40

All in good condition, Company-owned truks:31,

Sub-Contractor trucks:20

Total Capacity

51

2040mt

 

 

Home Way General Trading Co. Ltd - Capacity summary 700mt

Regions Covered

Jonglei, Lake State, Unity State, Central Equatoria, Western Equatoria, Eastern Equatoria Warrap State, Upper Nile, Bahr El Ghazal.

Vehicle Type

Number of

Vehicles

Capacity per

Vehicle (MT)

Comments / Condition of Vehicles

6x6

13

40

 Operational

4x4

6

20

 Operational

4x4 (Specialized)

6

10

 Operational

Total Capacity

25

700mt

 

 

Taran Transport Company. Limited - Capacity summary 16,340mt

Regions Covered

Unity, Western Corridor, Central, Greater Equatorial and Jonglei

Vehicle Type

Number of

Vehicles

Capacity per

Vehicle (MT)

Comments / Condition of Vehicles

6x4

407

40

 Always operational

8x8

3

20

Specialized operation

Total Capacity

410

16,340mt

 

 

DALMAR TRANSPORTERS LIMITED - Capacity summary 10,040mt

Regions Covered

Jonglei, Greater Equatoria, Unity State, Western Corridor,  (central Equatoria & Upper Nile)

Vehicle Type

Number of

Vehicles

Capacity per

Vehicle (MT)

Comments / Condition of Vehicles

Sided Trucks

226

40

 All are in excellent working condition

Pullings

50

20

All are in excellent working condition (Pulling trucks can accommodate 20mt or 40mt 

 Alternatively)

Total Capacity

226

10,040mt

 

 

Needland Logistics International Co.Ltd - Capacity summary 6000mt

Regions Covered

Ex-Juba to Greater Equatorial, Jonglei, Unity State and Western Corridor

Vehicle Type

Number of

Vehicles

Capacity per

Vehicle (MT)

Comments / Condition of Vehicles

HHGSIDED 6x4

131

40

 In Good condition

Box Body 6x4

16

40

In Good condition

Mercedes 6x4

3

40

In Good condition

Total Capacity

150

6,000mt

 

 

Tanasul Transporters Ltd - Capacity summary 14,320mt

Regions Covered

Western Corridor, Unity State, Jonglei, Western Equatorial &Upper Nile

Vehicle Type

Number of

Vehicles

Capacity per

Vehicle (MT)

Comments / Condition of Vehicles

6x4 Trucks

358

40

 All are in good condition

Total Capacity

358

14,320mt

 

 

TELCOM LOGISTICS LIMITED - Capacity summary 1300mt

Regions Covered

Bahr El Ghazal and Greater Equatorial region, plus the western corridor

Vehicle Type

Number of

Vehicles

Capacity per

Vehicle (MT)

Comments / Condition of Vehicles

Actross/Mercedes

25

40

 In good working condition

Actross

15

20

 In good working condition

Crane

5

2-50

 In good working condition

Total Capacity

45

1300mt

 

 

ROLE MODEL LOGISTICS LIMITED - Capacity summary 192mt

Regions Covered

Jonglei, Unity State, Western Equatorial, Western Corridor & Upper Nile

Vehicle Type

Number of

Vehicles

Capacity per

Vehicle (MT)

Comments / Condition of Vehicles

 High sided Truck 6x4

200

40

 In good condition

Total Capacity

200

8,000mt

 

 

Lusidle Petroleum and Logistics Ltd - Capacity summary 3640mt

Regions Covered

Juba, Bor, Rumbek, Wau, Pathai, Jonglei, Gorwai, Karam, Nimule, Bentiu, Kuajok, Abiemnhom, Wunrock, Mankein, Mayom etc

Vehicle Type

Number of

Vehicles

Capacity per

Vehicle (MT)

Comments / Condition of Vehicles

6x6 Trucks

91

40

 

The trucks are in good condition and road worthy.

 

 

 

 

 

Total Capacity

91

2640mt

 

 

Africa Hope Transport Co. Ltd - Capacity summary 175mt

Regions Covered

Upper Nile State (Maban - Renk, Melut and Malakal) hope african.

Vehicle Type

Number of

Vehicles

Capacity per

Vehicle (MT)

Comments / Condition of Vehicles

Hino Trucks

6

25

Good condition

Scania

1

25

Good condition

Total Capacity

7

175mt

 

 

Green Valley Enterprises Ltd - Capacity summary 380mt

Regions Covered

Upper Nile State (Maban-Renk, Melut and Malakal

Vehicle Type

Number of

Vehicles

Capacity per

Vehicle (MT)

Comments / Condition of Vehicles

Hino + IVECO

2

35

 Operational

Nissan UD-Power Star

2

35

Operational

Benz+Actross+MAN

6

40

Operational

Total Capacity

10

380mt

 

 

Hiyab General Trading Co. Ltd - Capacity summary 440mt

Regions Covered

Upper Nile State (Maban-Renk, Melut and Malakal)

Vehicle Type

Number of

Vehicles

Capacity per

Vehicle (MT)

Comments / Condition of Vehicles

Benz + IVECO + MAN

11

40

Operational

Total Capacity

11

440mt

 

 

Melaku General Trading Co. Ltd - Capacity summary 192mt

Regions Covered

Upper Nile state (Maban-Renk, Melut and Malakal)

Vehicle Type

Number of

Vehicles

Capacity per

Vehicle (MT)

Comments / Condition of Vehicles

Cino Truck

7

18

In good condition

Cino Truck

1

35

In good condition

Total Capacity

8

161mt

 

 

Salamanda Enterprises Co. Ltd - Capacity summary 192mt

Regions Covered

Upper Nile State (Maban-Renk, Melut and Malakal)

Vehicle Type

Number of

Vehicles

Capacity per

Vehicle (MT)

Comments / Condition of Vehicles

Actross

3

40

In good condition

Cino Truck

4

18

In good condition

Benz

2

35

In good condition

Total Capacity

9

262

 

 

Awale Enterprises Co. Ltd - Capacity summary 270mt

Regions Covered

Upper Nile (Maban-Renk, Melut and Malakal)

Vehicle Type

Number of

Vehicles

Capacity per

Vehicle (MT)

Comments / Condition of Vehicles

Actros

5

40

 Operational

Benz

2

35

Operational

Total Capacity

7

270mt

 

 

Baguma and Son (U) Ltd - Capacity summary 2240mt

Regions Covered

Unity State, Western Corridor, Jonglei state

Vehicle Type

Number of

Vehicles

Capacity per

Vehicle (MT)

Comments / Condition of Vehicles

Trucks

56

40

 All operational

Total Capacity

56

2240mt

 

 

Awale Enterprises Ltd - Capacity summary 192mt

Regions Covered

Juba, Rumbek and most parts of the country

Vehicle Type

Number of

Vehicles

Capacity per

Vehicle (MT)

Comments / Condition of Vehicles

6x4 and 6x6 Trucks

100

40 & 20

All operational

Total Capacity

100

 

 

 

TASAM Logistics Ltd - Capacity summary 8760mt

Regions Covered

Jonglei, Unity State, Western Corridor and Western Equatoria

Vehicle Type

Number of

Vehicles

Capacity per

Vehicle (MT)

Comments / Condition of Vehicles

Flatbed and High sided

219

40

 Good condition

Total Capacity

219

8760mt

 

 

ROYLINE Logistics limited - Capacity summary 4080mt

Regions Covered

Jonglei, Upper Nile, All Equatoria and Unity State

Vehicle Type

Number of

Vehicles

Capacity per

Vehicle (MT)

Comments / Condition of Vehicles

Sided

82

40

In good working condition

Containerised

20

40

In good working condition

Total Capacity

102

4080mt

 

 

M.O. Abdi & Sons Limited - Capacity summary 17600mt

Regions Covered

Moves to All parts of the country Unity, Jonglei, Western Corridor and Equatorial region.

Vehicle Type

Number of

Vehicles

Capacity per

Vehicle (MT)

Comments / Condition of Vehicles

8x8 Trucks

120

16-20

All Vehicles are in good condition

6x4 Trucks

380

40-45

All Vehicles are in good condition

Total Capacity

500

17600mt

 

 

Ugoro’s Sons for Transportation & Trading Co. Ltd

 Transport Capacity Summary 1727mt

Regions Covered

We cover;

Juba - Central Equatoria State regions

Juba - Unity State regions

Juba – Western Equatoria State regions

Juba – Eastern Equatoria State regions

Juba – Western Bahr el Ghazal State regions

Juba – Northern Bahr el Ghazal State regions

Juba – Ruweng Administrative Area regions

Juba – Jonglei State regions

 

Within Central Equatoria State regions

Within Unity State

Within Western Equatoria State

Within Eastern Equatoria State

Within Western Bahr el Ghazal State

Within Northern Equatoria State

Within Ruweng Administrative Area

Within Jonglei State

 

Vehicle Type

Number of

Vehicles

Capacity per

Vehicle (MT)

Comments / Condition of Vehicles

Renault Truck

3

40

 In good condition

Mercedes

10

40

In good condition

Actros

2

40

In good condition

Nissan

5

40

In good condition

Hino ZS

10

40

In good condition

Iveco

2

40

In good condition

Hino ZY

10

20

In good condition

Man Truck

3

20

In good condition

DAF

3

20

In good condition

Mercedes

5

10

In good condition

Nissan

5

10

In good condition

Voxy Wagen

2

10

In good condition

Mitsubish

1

7

In good condition

Total Capacity

61

1727mt

 

 

RH GLOBAL LOGISTICS - Capacity summary 940mt

Regions Covered

GREATER EQUATORIA, EASTERN EQUATORIA, KAPOEATA, LAKES, WESTERN EQUATORIA, NOTHERN BAR EL GHAZAL.

Vehicle Type

Number of

Vehicles

Capacity per

Vehicle (MT)

Comments / Condition of Vehicles

Truck 6x6

22

40

Running

Truck 6x8

1

60

Running

Total Capacity

23

940mt

 

 

FAST LOGISTICS LIMITED- Capacity summary 2320mt

Regions Covered

East African Region including Kenya, Uganda and South Sudan

Vehicle Type

Number of

Vehicles

Capacity per

Vehicle (MT)

Comments / Condition of Vehicles

6x4 Trucks

48

40

In Good condition

8x8 Trucks

20

20

In Good condition

Total Capacity

68

2320mt

 

 

Bahchu Trading Company Ltd- Capacity summary 1000mt

Regions Covered

Western Corridor, Jonglei, Unity State & Equatorial Region

Vehicle Type

Number of

Vehicles

Capacity per

Vehicle (MT)

Comments / Condition of Vehicles

6x4 Trucks

25

40

Operational

Total Capacity

25

1000mt

 

 

Relief & Mission Logistics South Sudan Ltd- Capacity summary 2770mt

Regions Covered

Move to all destinations on demand in South Sudan

Vehicle Type

Number of

Vehicles

Capacity per

Vehicle (MT)

Comments / Condition of Vehicles

Renault 440 series

4

40

Specialised all-terrain 6x6 Truck

DAF

21

30

Specialised all-terrain 8x8 Truck

MAN

5

30

Specialised all-terrain 6x6 Truck

MAN

9

40

Specialised all-terrain 8x8 Truck

M/Benz

5

30

Specialised all-terrain 6x6 Truck

VITYAZ

2

30

Very specialized all-weather

M/Benz

9

40

All terrain 6x4 truck

Renault 440

19

40

All-terrain 6x4 trucks

SCANIA

1

40

All Terrain 6x4 trucks

VOLVO

2

40

All Terrain 6x4

VOLVO

1

20

 All-terrain 6x4

ISUZU

1

20

All-terrain 6x4

Total Capacity

79

2770mt

 

 

Garara Logistics, Property & Home Service- Capacity summary 650mt

Regions Covered

Juba, Bor, Wau, Aweil, Bentiu, Renk, Paloich, Malakal, Maban, Yei, Rumbek, Yambio, Torit, Kapoeta

Vehicle Type

Number of

Vehicles

Capacity per

Vehicle (MT)

Comments / Condition of Vehicles

6x4 Truck

8

20

All are in good condition

6x6 Truck

10

40

All are in good condition

4x4 Truck

6

15

All are in good condition

Total Capacity

24

650mt

 

 

Allied Service- Capacity summary 585mt

Regions Covered

Juba, Renk, Paloich, Malakal, Maban, Yei, Rumbek and Yambio

Vehicle Type

Number of

Vehicles

Capacity per

Vehicle (MT)

Comments / Condition of Vehicles

Truck 1

11

20

All are in good working condition

Truck 2

8

40

All are in good working condition

Truck 3

3

15

All are in good working condition

Total Capacity

22

585mt

 

 

Wol Engineering Works Co. Ltd- Capacity summary 490mt

Regions Covered

Yirol east, Yirol west, Rumbek centre, Rumber east, Wulu, Cuibet, Rumbek north. Greater Bhar-El gazal, Wau, Wunrok, and Majok in Northern Bhar-El gazal.

Vehicle Type

Number of

Vehicles

Capacity per

Vehicle (MT)

Comments / Condition of Vehicles

Semi-Trailer 6x6

4

50

3 in good condition and 1 under repair

Hino truck

8

25-30

All are in good condition

Isuzu

6

10-15

All are in good condition

Total Capacity

18

490mt

 

 

S-Cubic (S3) Transporters and Construction Ltd- Capacity summary 705mt

Regions Covered

Wulu, Cuibet, Rumbek east, Atiaba, Akot, Aduel

Vehicle Type

Number of

Vehicles

Capacity per

Vehicle (MT)

Comments / Condition of Vehicles

Sino Truck

5

60

All in good condition

Actross

7

40

All in good condition

Sino truck

4

20

All in good condition

Isuzu

3

10-15

All in good condition

Total Capacity

19

705mt

 

 

Quick Service Transport Co. Ltd- Capacity summary 280mt

Regions Covered

Rumbek centre, Rumbek East, Akot, Atiaba, Wulu, Cuibet

Vehicle Type

Number of

Vehicles

Capacity per

Vehicle (MT)

Comments / Condition of Vehicles

Sino Trucks

6

20

 All are in good condition

Actros

4

40

All are in good condition

Total Capacity

10

280mt

 

 

Binazir Logistics Co.Ltd- Capacity summary 2100mt

Regions Covered

All locations in Mingkaman

Vehicle Type

Number of

Vehicles

Capacity per

Vehicle (MT)

Comments / Condition of Vehicles

All Types

43

40-60

All in good conditions

Total Capacity

43

2100mt

 

 

Save Logistics Co. Ltd- Capacity summary 2200mt

Regions Covered

All locations in Mingkaman

Vehicle Type

Number of

Vehicles

Capacity per

Vehicle (MT)

Comments / Condition of Vehicles

All types

53

40-50

All in good conditions

Total Capacity

53

2200mt

 

 

 Hiyab General Trading Co. Ltd- Capacity summary 940mt

Regions Covered

All locations in Mingkaman

Vehicle Type

Number of

Vehicles

Capacity per

Vehicle (MT)

Comments / Condition of Vehicles

All type

56

40-50

All operational

Total Capacity

56

2500mt

 

 

Regional Link Company Limited- Capacity summary 1360mt

Regions Covered

All locations in Mingkaman

Vehicle Type

Number of

Vehicles

Capacity per

Vehicle (MT)

Comments / Condition of Vehicles

All Type

34

40mt & 50mt

 All in good condition

Total Capacity

34

1360mt

 

 

Vigro Investment Co. Ltd- Capacity summary 1000mt

Regions Covered

All locations in Mingkaman and Rumbek

Vehicle Type

Number of

Vehicles

Capacity per

Vehicle (MT)

Comments / Condition of Vehicles

All Type

24

40mt & 50mt

 All are in good condition

Total Capacity

24

1000mt

 

 

Trojan Enterprises Limited- Capacity summary 545mt

Regions Covered

Within Bor and in the dry season to northern Jonglei

Vehicle Type

Number of

Vehicles

Capacity per

Vehicle (MT)

Comments / Condition of Vehicles

Man truck

4

40

Operational

Mercedes Benz

8

40

 Operational

Fait

5

13

Operational

Total Capacity

17

545mt

 

 

Phillip Auto Spare Garage for Investment Company Limited- Capacity summary 266mt

Regions Covered

All locations in Mingkaman

Vehicle Type

Number of

Vehicles

Capacity per

Vehicle (MT)

Comments / Condition of Vehicles

Mitsubishi

4

16

 All are in good condition

Isuzu

5

40

All are in good condition

Toyota Landcruiser pickup

3

2

All are in good condition

Total Capacity

12

266mt

 

 

Relief and Mission Logistics - Capacity summary 480mt

Regions Covered

In Jonglei and GPAA regions

Vehicle Type

Number of

Vehicles

Capacity per

Vehicle (MT)

Comments / Condition of Vehicles

Renault

8

40

 All are in good condition

Man Truck

4

40

All are in good condition

Total Capacity

10

480mt

 

 

Trojan Enterprise CO. Limited - Capacity summary 596mt

Regions Covered

Kapoata, Torit, Juba, Bor, Rumbek, Western Equatoria

Vehicle Type

Number of

Vehicles

Capacity per

Vehicle (MT)

Comments / Condition of Vehicles

Fiat 6*6

8

14

All operational

Scania 6*6

3

14

All operational

 Man-truck 8*8

4

15

All operational

Isuzu 6*4

9

18

All operational

 Fuso 6*4

6

18

All operational

Actros 6*4

2

18MT

All operational

Hino 6*4

1

40MT

Operational

Total Capacity

33

596mt

 

 

AVANT INVESTMENT CO.LTD Transport Capacity Summary 596mt

Regions Covered

Eastern Equatoria Region ( Torit and Kapoeta)

 

 

Number of

Vehicles

Capacity per

Vehicle (MT)

Comments / Condition of Vehicles

Vehicle Type: Oral 6*6

5

12MT

All appears in good condition.

Vehicle Type: Sino Truck 8*8

7

18MT

All sound

Vehicle Type: Iveco 6*6

10

16MT

All appears in good condition

 

Vehicle Type: Iveco Box body 8*8

10

25MT

Good condition

Total Capacity

32 Trucks

596 MT

 

 

 

WARSAM HOLDINGS CO.LTD Transport Capacity Summary 196mt

Regions Covered

Please provide a list of administrative districts (Level 1 and Level 2) covered by this transporter.

 

 

Number of

Vehicles

Capacity per

Vehicle (MT)

Comments / Condition of Vehicles

Vehicle Type: Mujurus 6*6

2

10MT

All operational

Vehicle Type: M-General 6*6

2

13MT

All operational

Vehicle Type: Benz 6*6

6

20MT

All operational

Vehicle Type: Iveco 6*6

2

15MT

All operational

Total Capacity

12 Trucks

196 MT

 

 

East Africa Fluid and Cargo Freight Transport-Transport Capacity Summary 613mt

Regions Covered

Eastern Equatorian Region

 

 

Number of

Vehicles

Capacity per

Vehicle (MT)

Comments / Condition of Vehicles

Vehicle Type: Scania 8*8

6

15MT

All operational

Vehicle Type: Iveco 4*4

11

18MT

All operational

Vehicle Type: Renault 8*8

4

20MT

All operational

Vehicle Type: Oral 6*6

13

10MT

All operational

Vehicle Type: Mitsubishi 4*4

2

10MT

All operational

Vehicle Type: Daf 8*8

1

25MT

Operational

Vehicle Type: Tracker 4*4

2

20MT

All operational

Vehicle Type: Isuzu 4*6

1

20MT

Operational

Vehicle Type: Btford 4*4

1

10MT

Operational

Total Capacity

41 Trucks

613 MT

All in good condition and operational

 

GUMATER-Transport capacity summary 760mt

Regions Covered

Greater Tonj, Greater Gogrial, Twic.

 

Number of

Vehicles

Capacity per

Vehicle (MT)

Comments / Condition of Vehicles

Trailers

8

45

Good

6x6

16

25

Good

Total Capacity

 

760

 

 

Marordit- Transport capacity summary 645mt

Regions Covered

Greater Tonj, Greater Gogrial, Twic.

 

Number of

Vehicles

Capacity per

Vehicle (MT)

Comments / Condition of Vehicles

Trailers

6

45

Good

6x6

15

25

Good

Total Capacity

 

645

 

 

PLEK Investment- Transport capacity summary 645mt

Regions Covered

Greater Tonj, Greater Gogrial, Twic

 

Number of

Vehicles

Capacity per

Vehicle (MT)

Comments / Condition of Vehicles

Trailers

5

45

Good

6x6

10

25

Good

Total Capacity

 

475

 

 

TANAD TRANSPORTERS- Transport capacity summary 825mt

Regions Covered

Greater Tonj, Greater Gogrial, Twic.

 

Number of

Vehicles

Capacity per

Vehicle (MT)

Comments / Condition of Vehicles

Trailers

10

45

Good

6x6

15

25

Good

Total Capacity

 

825

 

 

Ugoro’s Sons- Transport capacity summary 770mt

Regions Covered

Greater Tonj, Greater Gogrial, Twic.

 

Number of

Vehicles

Capacity per

Vehicle (MT)

Comments / Condition of Vehicles

Trailers

6

45

Good

6x6

20

25

Good

Total Capacity

 

770

 

 

African Investment- Transport capacity summary 675mt

Regions Covered

Greater Tonj, Greater Gogrial, Twic.

 

Number of

Vehicles

Capacity per

Vehicle (MT)

Comments / Condition of Vehicles

Trailers

5

45

Good

6x6

18

25

Good

Total Capacity

 

675

 

 

ABAR- Transport capacity summary 950mt

Regions Covered

Greater Tonj, Greater Gogrial, Twic.

 

Number of

Vehicles

Capacity per

Vehicle (MT)

Comments / Condition of Vehicles

Trailers

10

45

Good

6x6

20

25

Good

Total Capacity

 

950

 

 

Barise- Transport capacity summary 670mt

Regions Covered

Greater Tonj, Greater Gogrial, Twic.

 

Number of

Vehicles

Capacity per

Vehicle (MT)

Comments / Condition of Vehicles

Trailers

6

45

Good

6x6

16

25

Good

Total Capacity

 

670

 

 

FADA- Transport capacity summary 605mt

Regions Covered

Greater Tonj, Greater Gogrial, Twic.

 

Number of

Vehicles

Capacity per

Vehicle (MT)

Comments / Condition of Vehicles

Trailers

4

45

Good

6x6

17

25

Good

Total Capacity

 

605

 

 

Muna Company- Transport capacity summary 530mt

Regions Covered

Greater Tonj, Greater Gogrial, Twic.

 

Number of

Vehicles

Capacity per

Vehicle (MT)

Comments / Condition of Vehicles

Trailers

4

45

Good

6x6

14

25

Good

Total Capacity

 

530

 

 

Abiem Company- Transport capacity summary 485mt

Regions Covered

Greater Tonj, Greater Gogrial, Twic.

 

Number of

Vehicles

Capacity per

Vehicle (MT)

Comments / Condition of Vehicles

Trailers

3

45

Good

 6x6

14

25

Good

Total Capacity

 

485

 

 

GOAMAL GENERAL TRADING- Transport capacity summary 215mt

Regions Covered

Akobo Region

 

Number of

Vehicles

Capacity per

Vehicle (MT)

Comments / Condition of Vehicles

Tharara Big

3

45

All in Good condition

Lorries

2

40

All in Good condition

Total Capacity

 

215

 

 

Savannah Trading- Transport capacity summary 315mt

Regions Covered

Greater Tonj, Greater Gogrial, Twic.

 

Number of

Vehicles

Capacity per

Vehicle (MT)

Comments / Condition of Vehicles

Trailers

2

45

Good

6x6

9

25

Good

Total Capacity

 

315

 

 

Nyaweelo General Company- Transport capacity summary 45mt

Regions Covered

Juba, Gambella, Uganda, Bentiu, Akobo, Malakal, Maban

 

Number of

Vehicles

Capacity per

Vehicle (MT)

Comments / Condition of Vehicles

ZY

2

22.5

Good

Total Capacity

 

45

 

 

Disclaimer: Inclusion of company information in the LCA does not imply any business relationship between the supplier and WFP / Logistics Cluster, and is used solely as a determinant of services, and capacities.

Please note: WFP / Logistics Cluster maintain complete impartiality and are not in a position to endorse, comment on any company's suitability as a reputable service provider.

South Sudan, Republic of - 3.3 Manual Labor Costs

In South Sudan, manual labor plays a significant role in various sectors of the economy, including agriculture, construction, and informal industries. However, the country lacks comprehensive national legislation specifically addressing manual labor. The labor laws that do exist primarily focus on broader labor rights and protections.

Trade unions exist in South Sudan, but their influence and impact on manual labor are limited. The trade union movement is still in its early stages of development, and there are challenges in organizing and representing workers effectively.

The availability of manual labor in South Sudan is relatively high, given the country's youthful population and limited job opportunities in other sectors. Many individuals rely on manual labor as a means of livelihood. However, issues such as low wages, lack of job security, and poor working conditions are common challenges workers face in manual, labor-intensive sectors.

Rates vary currently with the fluctuating exchange rate.

It is important to consult current sources and labour-related legislation in South Sudan to obtain the most accurate and up-to-date information on the usage of manual labour, national legislation, the role of unions, cost incentives, common areas of work, and the issues faced by organizations in the country.

Labour Rate(s) Overview

 

Cost
(Local Currency & USD - $)

Rate as of July 2023

Daily General Worker-Unskilled casual labour

SSP: 9,000 & $9

July 2023

Daily General Worker -Semi-skilled labour

SSP: 7,000 & $7

July 2023

Skilled Worker

SSP:5,000 & $5

July 2023

 

South Sudan, Republic of - 3.4 Telecommunications

The Ministry of Telecommunications and Postal Services (MOTPS) is responsible for the development of the country's telecommunications infrastructure and oversees and regulates the telecommunications network and service providers. The country has no formal landline telephone network, and telecommunications services are provided through satellite and mobile communications networks. Various large international mobile phone providers are present in the country. Most urban centres and along major roads have mobile phone coverage. Sim cards are readily available in the market, and registration is required. Mobile Internet is available on all networks, with high speed in significant towns and low speed in other locations; however, data costs are still relatively high. 

For more information on telecoms contacts, please see the following link: 4.11 Additional Services Contact List.

Telephone Services

Is there an existing landline telephone network?

No, only digital mobile network are available

Does it allow international calls?

Yes only digital networks  

Number and Length of Downtime Periods (on average)

Negligible

Mobile Phone Providers

MTN, Zain and Digital

Approximate Percentage of National Coverage

 All major urban centres, surrounding areas and along major roads

Telecommunications Regulations

There are formal telecommunications regulations in place. The National Communication Authority (NCA) is currently responsible for the allocation of frequencies and agreements. The Ministry of Telecommunication and Postal Services (MOTPS) aims to establish a Telecommunications Regulator by 2014 and is currently working with various international actors in this regard.

Regulations on Usage and Import

 

Regulations in Place?

Regulating Authority

Satellite

Yes

NCA

HF Radio

Yes

NCA

UHF/VHF/HF Radio: Handheld, Base and Mobile

Yes

NCA

UHF/VHF Repeaters

Yes

NCA

GPS

Yes

NCA

VSAT

Yes

NCA

Individual Network Operator Licenses Required

Yes

Frequency Licenses Required

Yes

Existing Humanitarian Telecoms Systems

The humanitarian communications system is well developed and present with 24-hour staffed radio rooms located in all major state capitals and areas with a permanent humanitarian presence.
Currently, the Emergency Telecommunications Cluster (ETC) is not operational in South Sudan from Sudan. The country is now using the communication cluster, which only organizes meetings and responds during emergencies.

Existing UN Telecommunication Systems

 

UNDP

WFP

UNHCR

UNDSS

UNICEF

OCHA

VHF Frequencies

 Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

HF Frequencies

 Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Locations of Repeaters

 No

Yes

No

 Yes

No

No

VSAT

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Internet Service Providers (ISPs)

Yes, South Sudan have internet service providers (ISPs) and all are concentrated in Juba, Organisation can contract them for their internet services in Juba. The country has two fibre optic connections from Uganda. South Sudan uses the optic fibre connection in Juba and in the field, they use V-sat. The service providers are reliable in Juba but limited in other parts of the Country.

 

Internet Service Providers

Are there ISPs available?

Yes

If yes, are they privately or government-owned?

 Private

Dial-up only?

No

Approximate Rates (local currency and USD - $)

Dial-up

 N/A

Broadband

 $100 per MB

Max Leasable ‘Dedicated’ Bandwidth

 300mbs

 

Mobile Network Operators (MNOs)

Mobile networks have significantly expanded their coverage and reliability in South Sudan over the years, improving access to communication and connectivity for the population. However, challenges remain due to the country's vast geography, limited infrastructure, and ongoing conflict. While major mobile network operators operate in South Sudan, coverage can be uneven, particularly in remote and conflict-affected areas.

Companies such as MTN South Sudan, Zain South Sudan, and Digital South Sudan dominate the mobile network market in the country. These operators have made substantial investments in expanding their network infrastructure and improving service quality. However, due to the challenging operating environment, including frequent power outages and limited maintenance capacity, network reliability can vary.

In terms of regulatory requirements affecting the use of mobile money at scale, the Central Bank of South Sudan has established guidelines and regulations to ensure the security, stability, and proper functioning of mobile financial services. These regulations include Know Your Customer (KYC) requirements, transaction limits, and safeguards against money laundering and terrorist financing.

 

Furthermore, the Central Bank of South Sudan closely monitors and regulates mobile money operators to protect consumer interests and maintain financial stability. This includes licensing requirements, reporting obligations, and regular audits of mobile money platforms.

For information on MNOs please visit the GSM Association website.

Company

Number of Agent Outlets by Area

Network Strength by Area

Contracted for Humanitarian or Government Cash Transfer

Programmes?

Services Offered

(i.e. Merchant Payment,

Bulk Disbursement,

Receive & Make Payment)

Zain

 N/A

N/a

No

N/A

MTN

 N/A

N/a

No

N/A

Digital

 N/A

N/a

No

N/A

 

South Sudan, Republic of - 3.5 Food and Additional Suppliers

Overview

There are no established suppliers for food (Maize, CSB, Pulses, Sugar, Oil or RTE (Ready to Eat) produced in South Sudan. Most locally produced foodstuffs are available in local markets or transported to larger markets in urban areas. Most foods are imported from neighbouring countries Uganda and Kenya.

WFP’s 'P4P' unit has started to establish business relationship with a selection of farmers’ organisations and cooperatives in Western and Central Equatoria with the aim of stimulating local production and making surplus food available to the wider market.

Operational support items such as water tanks, generators tents and basic IT equipment are readily available in major market centres around the country, however specialised items would need to be imported from neighbouring countries. 

Generic country information can be located from sources which are regularly maintained and reflect current facts and figures. For a general overview of country data related to the service and supply sectors, please consult to following sources:

 The Observatory of Economic Complexity – MIT (OEC) South Sudan -Page 

Disclaimer: Inclusion of company information in the LCA does not imply any business relationship between the supplier and WFP / Logistics Cluster, and is used solely as a determinant of services, and capacities. Please note: WFP / Logistics Cluster maintain complete impartiality and are not in a position to endorse, comment on any company's suitability as a reputable service provider.

 

3.6 South Sudan Additional Service Providers

South Sudan Additional Service Providers: Vehicle Rental, Taxi Companies, Freight Forwarding Agents, Handling Equipment, Power Generation and ISPs

Since independence the market of service providers have expanded exponentially with both national and international companies providing a host of support services. As in other business sectors, domestic operators and service providers have also seen significant growth and the government is actively encouraging the development of local ownership. However the growth in this sector and the quality of the services provided is constrained by a shortage of specialised skills in the local labour market and the perceived difficulty of doing business in South Sudan.  

Vehicle Rental

Various vehicle rental companies are present in South Sudan with a wide selection of vehicles available for hire. The vast majority of such companies however have small vehicle fleets with varying capacities and vehicles maintained to questionable standards. No large international vehicle rental companies are present in South Sudan and organisations looking to augment their vehicle fleet will need to negotiate directly with vehicle owners.

Taxi Companies

The taxi industry is unregulated and characterised by privately owner-operated vehicles and motorbikes. There are a number of larger locally owned taxi operators however travel rates vary and needs to be negotiated for. Travel by motorbike or ‘boda-boda’ is readily available and at a relatively low cost, however at significant risk due to prevailing road conditions. In general the use of locally available taxi’s and motorbikes is reliable; however it does pose some personal security risk to travellers. As no taxi operators have ‘passenger liability’ insurance. Hence, it is advisable that international travellers include this in any travel insurance. 

Freight Forwarding Agents

A number of freight forwarding companies and brokers with varying capacities are operational in South Sudan. The larger operators have good contacts within relevant government departments and access to a variety of logistical services including air, water and land transport providers making their services relatively reliable. The majority of freight forwarding agents are situated in Juba with a smaller number located in other major towns. 

Handling Equipment 

Handling equipment can be rented from local commercial companies or acquired in the market. Most specialised equipment need to be imported from neighbouring countries however.
Non-standardised pallets can be manufactured in the local market, in general however all wooden and plastic pallets are imported.

Electricity and Power 

The Ministry of Energy and Dams is responsible for the development of the country’s electricity infrastructure. In 2012, the ministry established the South Sudan Electricity Corporation (SSEC), which oversees the generation, transmission, distribution and sale of electricity within the country, and most of the state capitals now have some electrical power, commonly referred to as ‘City power’. The in-country power-generating infrastructure consists of large diesel operated power plants and distribution systems. However, the electrical power coverage is limited to these urban areas and prioritized for local administration/government and local hospitals, as the power grid is severely limited. The electricity supply in South Sudan is only partially accessible in certain areas and in these areas the supply is often erratic, and characterised by frequent power outages due to broken power units, or more commonly, a lack of fuel.
The most recently commissioned power plants and electrical distribution systems are situated in Juba, Malakal, Wau, Bor, Yambio, Rumbek and Renk. The power production plant for Juba has been greatly improved in terms of efficiency but still coverage of the town is limited. Malakal has good coverage through large functioning diesel generators. Considering that power generation is largely unreliable and inconsistent it is essential that major organizations have their own power generating capacity and back-up units. Small to large portable generators are readily available in local markets. In 2012, the country had approximately 33MW of installed generating capacity with partial access mainly to the towns Juba, Malakal and Wau.
In 2012, the Government entered into an agreement with the government of Ethiopia to import electricity into the country. The agreement called for the installation of a 230 KV transmission line from Gambela and a 500 KV transmission line from the Grand Renaissance Dam in Ethiopia to South Sudan. The agreement is to come into affect upon the completion of the dam.

Production Unit

Type [1]

Installed Capacity (MW)

Current Production (MW)

Juba (Wartsila)

Diesel

12 MW

Operational

Juba (Cummins)

Diesel

8 MW

Non-Operational

Malakal

Diesel

4.8 MW

Operational

Wau

Diesel

2 MW

Operational

Bor

Diesel

2 MW

Non Operational due to severe fuel shortages

Yambio

Diesel

2 MW

Non Operational due to severe fuel shortages

Rumbek

Diesel

2 MW

Non Operational due to severe fuel shortages

Renk (S/Station)

Diesel

40 Mva

Operational


[1] E.g. Hydroelectric power, Thermal power...

Internet Service Providers (ISPs)

South Sudan is one of the most expensive countries in Africa in terms of Internet usage, with an average retail cost of USD$ 4,000 per megabit via satellite. All licenced service providers use satellite-based V-Sat and WiMax technology as the country has no established fibre optics network, nor is it directly connected to East Africa’s internet fibre-optic networks serviced by The East African Marine Systems (TEAMS), Eastern Africa Submarine Cable System (EASSy) and SEACOM providers.
The Ministry of Telecommunication and Postal Services (MOTPS) plays an oversight function and is in charge of regulating and licencing of local telecommunications companies. Currently telecommunications regulations are set to change with the adoption of new regulations in late 2013.Currently there are no national carrier in South Sudan, however the Council of Ministers approved the establishment of a national telecommunications operator in May 2013. In late 2012, the country had five licensed Internet Service Providers and this number continues to grow with an estimated 15 ISPs currently in various stages of operation.

Internet Service Providers

Are there ISPs available?

(Yes / No)

Yes

Private or Government

Private

Dial-up only (Yes / No)

No

Approximate Rates

Dial-up:

n/a

Broadband:

n/a

Max leasable 'dedicated' bandwidth

n/a

South Sudan, Republic of - 3.7 Waste Management Infrastructure Assessment 

Overview 

Waste Collection: South Sudan has poor waste collection ratios due to the lack of an integrated solid waste management system. Case in point, only 2.6% (34.3 tons) of 1, 337 tons of solid waste generated in Juba per day is collected​ (JICA, 2018)​. In urban areas such as Juba, waste is typically collected by municipal authorities or private companies by use of trucks. However, coverage and frequency of waste collection in urban centres is still inadequate due to limited infrastructure and resources, leading to uncollected waste and improper disposal. In rural areas, waste collection systems are generally lacking, and waste is often disposed of indiscriminately in open ground. 

Regulations and Government Bodies:  The Ministry of Environment and Forestry is the main government body responsible for Solid waste management. The ministry implements waste management activities in the country in coordination with municipal authorities such as the Juba City Council.   The “Environmental Management Act of 2012” is the primary legislation governing environmental protection, including waste management Additional regulations include The National Environmental Policy (2015-2025); provides a framework that ensures protection and conservation of the environment and sustainable management of renewable natural resources.  

National policy on medical waste management (2011); provides guidance on medical waste management in South Sudan and is actioned by the national medical waste management plan. 

Juba City Council by-laws (2013); waste management in the Juba City by-laws is covered under Chapter 3 “Cleaning of Juba City Council”. 

Rejaf County By-laws, 2016-2017; waste management in the Rejaf by-laws is covered in clauses 5 and 6 of Chapter 1.    

However, it is essential to note that the enforcement and implementation of these regulations face challenges due to limited resources and capacity. 

Service Providers: Waste management services in South Sudan are primarily provided by the government and some private companies. City Council authorities are responsible for waste collection in urban areas, although the coverage and quality of services may vary. Private companies also play a role in waste collection, particularly in larger cities; a survey done by JICA established there were 16 registered private waste collection actors in Juba in 2018​ (JICA, 2018, p. 21)​.  However, the overall capacity and efficiency of waste management services in the country are limited; this is evident in Juba City Council where only 10 of the registered private actors were operational and all 10 solid waste collection trucks owned by the council had broken down by the time of the survey.However, the overall capacity and efficiency of waste management services in the country are limited; this is evident in Juba City Council where only 10 of the registered private actors were operational and all 10 solid waste collection trucks owned by the council had broken down by the time of the survey. 

Landfills: Management of landfills is primarily the responsibility of local authorities, although they lack adequate capacity and resources for proper landfill maintenance. There is no actual data on the number and status of landfills in the country.  Many areas rely on open dumping or operate illegal dumping sites without adhering to statutory requirements for example, Juba-Nimule Road has a roadside illegal dumping site that receives up to 8.6 tons of solid waste per day​ (JICA, 2018)​.    

Existing few legally controlled dump sites remain dilapidated, for example, the perimeter fence at the Juba controlled dump site was vandalized, hence allowing access to hostile waste pickers who openly burn waste and pose a security threat to drivers. In addition, frequent breakdown of bulldozers leads to foul smells from the landfills due to delayed burying of waste.  

Recycling Programs: Recycling programs in South Sudan are still in their early stages of development. While there are some private initiatives and small-scale recycling efforts, the overall recycling infrastructure is limited. In addition, the lack of a sustainable financing mechanism has led to the collapse of recycling initiatives led by local innovators.  

Challenges: Institutional, social, economic, and technical factors contribute to ineffective solid waste management in South Sudan.  

Institutional: Bureaucracy in approval of draft policies and laws regarding solid waste management. Most of these bills get stuck in the draft phase, hence hindering the provision of an adequate framework for the implementation of integrated solid waste management. Political instability also continues to affect the implementation of solid waste management initiatives as most interested private sector partners would fear for their individual safety.   

Social:  Household waste is not collected at source due to the lack of an integrated solid waste management system, hence most citizens typically dump waste on open ground or by the roadside due to a lack of awareness. This culture is ingrained in residents and contributes to a littered environment.   

Economic:  Ineffective coordination in financing and accounting. Waste management in Juba is coordinated by the Juba City Council but is broken down into 4 zones to ease service delivery. All four zones have independent accounting systems and act autonomously to each other and to the Department of Environment and Sanitation in the Juba City Council account. Such working arrangements hinder the efficient coordination of solid waste management initiatives.  

Technical: Lack of enough expertise to repair specialized vehicles such as compactors causes periodic grounding of the few available solid waste collection fleets reducing service efficiency; spare parts for such vehicles are also not readily available within the local market.  The density of paved roads in South Sudan is about 0.2 km for every 1000km2, hence most roads in between homes are muddy especially during the rainy season making it difficult for the fleet to approach waste collection​ (AFDB)​.   

For more information on waste management company contact details, please see the following link: 4.12 Waste Management Companies Contact List.

Hazardous Waste Disposal 

The availability of proper disposal options for hazardous waste in South Sudan is limited, posing significant challenges to the environment and public health. Hazardous waste, including e-waste, medical waste, appliances, air conditioners, refrigerators, oils, petrol, and lubricants, requires specialized handling and disposal due to its potential to harm human health and the environment. 

Currently, South Sudan lacks a comprehensive system for safely disposing of hazardous waste. There is a lack of dedicated facilities and infrastructure to handle and treat such waste effectively. As a result, hazardous waste is often disposed of improperly, such as open burning or dumping, which can release harmful substances into the air, soil, and water sources. 

The absence of specific regulations and guidelines for managing hazardous waste exacerbates the problem. South Sudan needs to develop and enforce legislation that addresses the proper handling, storage, transportation, treatment, and disposal of hazardous waste. This would involve establishing designated collection points, recycling facilities, and treatment plants to dispose of different types of hazardous waste safely. 

Efforts should also focus on raising awareness among the public and industries about the risks associated with improper disposal of hazardous waste and promoting responsible waste management practices. International partnerships and support can be crucial in providing technical expertise, funding, and capacity-building initiatives to help South Sudan develop a robust and sustainable system for hazardous waste management and disposal. 

For more information on waste types, please refer to the WREC project.  

 

Non-Hazardous Waste Disposal 

The availability of proper disposal options for non-hazardous waste, such as regular trash from camps or compounds, is also limited in South Sudan. The country faces challenges in waste management infrastructure and resources, which affects the proper disposal of non-hazardous waste. 

In many areas, non-hazardous waste is often disposed of through open dumping or burning, leading to environmental pollution and health risks. Municipal/City council authorities and private companies involved in waste management may provide some collection services in urban areas, but the coverage and frequency of waste collection may be inadequate. 

Regarding wastewater disposal, South Sudan faces challenges in managing black water (from toilets) and grey water (from sinks, showers, and laundry). The lack of proper sewage systems and treatment facilities results in the discharge of untreated wastewater into rivers, streams, or open areas. This can lead to contamination of water sources and the spread of waterborne diseases. 

To improve the disposal of non-hazardous waste and wastewater in South Sudan, there is a need for investment in waste management infrastructure, including waste collection systems, treatment facilities, and proper sewage systems. Government support and regulations are necessary to promote responsible waste disposal practices, and public awareness campaigns can help educate the population about the importance of proper waste management and the potential environmental and health impacts of improper disposal. 

Disclaimer: Registration does not imply any business relationship between the supplier and WFP/Logistics Cluster, and is used solely as a determinant of services, and capacities.  

Please Note: WFP/Logistics Cluster maintain complete impartiality and is not in a position to endorse, or comment on any company's suitability as a reputable service provider. 

 

​​Bibliograph