Bangladesh

Bangladesh

Country name:

Bangladesh

Official country name:

People’s Republic of Bangladesh

Table of Contents

Chapter Name of Assessor Organisation Date of Update

1 Bangladesh Country Profile

Wahid Zaman WFP Feb 2020

1.1 Bangladesh Humanitarian Background

Wahid Zaman WFP Feb 2020

1.2 Bangladesh Regulatory Departments

Wahid Zaman WFP Feb 2020

1.3 Bangladesh Customs Information

Wahid Zaman WFP Feb 2020

2 Bangladesh Logistics Infrastructure

Wahid Zaman WFP Feb 2020
2.1 Bangladesh Port Assessment Wahid Zaman WFP Feb 2020

2.1.1 Bangladesh Port of Chittagong

Wahid Zaman WFP Feb 2020

2.1.2 Bangladesh Port of Mongla

Wahid Zaman WFP Feb 2020

2.1.3 Bangladesh Port of Payra

Wahid Zaman WFP Feb 2020
2.1.4 Bangladesh Port of Matarbari Wahid Zaman WFP Feb 2020

2.2 Bangladesh Aviation

Wahid Zaman WFP Feb 2020

2.2.1 Bangladesh Hazrat Shahjalal Dhaka International Airport (HSIA)

Wahid Zaman WFP Feb 2020
2.2.2 Bangladesh Shah Amanat International Airport Wahid Zaman WFP Feb 2020
2.2.3 Bangladesh Osmani International Airport Wahid Zaman WFP Feb 2020
2.2.4 Bangladesh Saidpur Airport Wahid Zaman WFP Feb 2020
2.2.5 Bangladesh Shah Makhdum Airport Wahid Zaman WFP Feb 2020
2.2.6 Bangladesh Jessore Airport Wahid Zaman WFP Feb 2020
2.2.7 Bangladesh Barisal Airport Wahid Zaman WFP Feb 2020
2.2.8 Bangladesh Cox's Bazar Airport Wahid Zaman WFP Feb 2020
2.2.9 Bangladesh Thakuragaon Airport Wahid Zaman WFP Feb 2020
 2.2.10 Bangladesh Ishurdi Airport Wahid Zaman WFP Feb 2020
 2.2.11 Bangladesh Shamshernagar Airport Wahid Zaman WFP Feb 2020
2.2.12 Bangladesh Tejgaon Airport Wahid Zaman WFP Feb 2020
2.2.13 Bangladesh Comilla Airport Wahid Zaman WFP Feb 2020

2.3 Bangladesh Road Network

Wahid Zaman WFP Feb 2020

2.4 Bangladesh Railway Assessment

Wahid Zaman WFP Feb 2020

2.5 Bangladesh Waterways Assessment

Wahid Zaman WFP Feb 2020

2.6 Bangladesh Storage Assessment

Wahid Zaman WFP Feb 2020

2.7 Bangladesh Milling Assessment

Wahid Zaman WFP Feb 2020

3 Bangladesh Logistics Services

Wahid Zaman WFP Feb 2020

3.1 Bangladesh Fuel

Wahid Zaman WFP Feb 2020

3.2 Bangladesh Transporters

Wahid Zaman WFP Feb 2020

3.3 Bangladesh Manual Labor Costs

Wahid Zaman WFP Feb 2020

3.4 Bangladesh Telecommunications

Wahid Zaman WFP Feb 2020
3.5 Bangladesh Food Suppliers, Accommodation and Other Markets Wahid Zaman WFP Feb 2020

3.6 Bangladesh Additional Service Providers

Wahid Zaman WFP Feb 2020

4 Bangladesh Contact Lists

Wahid Zaman WFP Feb 2020

4.1 Bangladesh Government Contact List

Wahid Zaman WFP Feb 2020

4.2 Bangladesh Humanitarian Agency Contact List

Wahid Zaman WFP Feb 2020
4.3 Bangladesh Laboratory and Quality Testing Companies Contact List Wahid Zaman WFP Feb 2020

4.4 Bangladesh Port and Waterways Company Contact List

Wahid Zaman WFP Feb 2020

4.5 Bangladesh Airport Contact List

Daniel Adriaens WFP Aug 2011

4.6 Bangladesh Storage and Milling Company Contact List

Wahid Zaman WFP Feb 2020

4.7 Bangladesh Fuel Provider Contact List

Wahid Zaman WFP Feb 2020

4.8 Bangladesh Transporter Contact List

Wahid Zaman WFP Feb 2020
4.9 Bangladesh Railway Company Contact List Wahid Zaman WFP Feb 2020
4.10 Bangladesh Supplier Contact List Wahid Zaman WFP Feb 2020

4.11 Bangladesh Additional Service Provision Contact List

Wahid Zaman WFP Feb 2020
4.12 Bangladesh Waste Management Companies Contact List WREC WFP Oct 2022

5 Bangladesh Annexes

Daniel Adriaens WFP Aug 2011
5.1 Bangladesh Acronyms and Abbreviations Wahid Zaman WFP Feb 2020

1 Bangladesh Country Profile

Bangladesh Country Map

Generic Information

Modern Bangladesh emerged as an independent nation in 1971 after breaking away and obtaining independence from Pakistan in the Bangladesh Liberation War. The country's borders corresponded with the major portion of the ancient and historic region of Bengal in the eastern part of the Indian subcontinent, where civilization dates back over four millennia, to the Chalcolithic. The history of the region is closely intertwined with the history of Bengal and the broader history of the Indian subcontinent. Stone Age tools dating back to over 20,000 years ago have been found in the Greater Bengal region thus indicating human settlement in the region. After gaining its independence, Bangladesh became a republic within the Commonwealth and a secular democracy. In 1973, Bangladesh joined the Organization of Islamic Cooperation (OIC) and the Non-Aligned Movement and later joined the United Nations in 1974.

The People's Republic of Bangladesh is a parliamentary democracy, with the President as Chief of State and Prime Minister as Head of Government. The President is elected to a five-year term and may serve two terms total. All citizens over 18 years of age can vote. The unicameral parliament is called the Jatiya Sangsad; its 300 members also serve five-year terms. The President officially appoints the Prime Minister, but he or she must be the representative of the majority coalition in parliament.

Bangladesh, with nearly 169 million inhabitants (as of 2019) on a landmass of 147,570 square kilometers, is among the most densely populated countries in the world. It remains a moderate-income country, with a per capita income of US$ 1909 (Atlas method) in FY 2019.

Geography is a strong determinant of Bangladesh. The country is bounded by India on the west, north, and north-east, Myanmar on the south-east, and the Bay of Bengal on the south. Eighty percent of its area consists of floodplains created by more than 300 rivers and channels, including three major rivers: the Ganges, the Brahmaputra, and the Meghna. Bangladesh forms only a small part of a large regional hydrologic system—less than 10 percent of the river basin falls within the national territory. Its southern part is nestled in the Bay of Bengal with a 710 km long coastal belt that is home to nearly 35 million people.

Bangladesh lies between latitudes 20° and 27°N, and longitudes 88° and 93°E. Bangladesh is in the low-lying Ganges–Brahmaputra Delta. This delta is formed by the confluence of the Ganges (local name Padma), Brahmaputra (Jamuna also known as "Yamuna"), and Meghna rivers and their respective tributaries. The Ganges unites with the Jamuna (main channel of the Brahmaputra) and later joins the Meghna to empty into the Bay of Bengal. The alluvial soil deposited by these rivers has created some of the most fertile plains in the world. Bangladesh has 57 trans-boundary rivers, making water issues politically complicated to resolve. Most parts of Bangladesh are less than 12 m (39.4 ft) above the sea level, and it is believed that about 10% of the land would be flooded if the sea level were to rise by 1 m (3.28 ft).

Hills rise above the plain only in the Chattogram Hill Tracts in the far southeast and the Sylhet division in the northeast. Straddling the Tropic of Cancer, Bangladesh has a subtropical monsoonal climate characterized by heavy seasonal rainfall, moderately warm temperatures, and high humidity. Natural calamities, such as floods, tropical cyclones, tornadoes, and tidal bores affect the country almost every year. Bangladesh also is affected by major cyclones; on average 16 times a decade. Bangladesh’s geographical position and very high population density make it extremely vulnerable to natural disasters including floods, droughts, and cyclones. Global climate change has increased these vulnerabilities manifold.

The highest point in Bangladesh is in Mowdok Range at 1,052 m (3,451 ft) in the Chattogram Hill Tracts to the southeast of the country. Cox's Bazar, south of the city of Chattogram, has a beach that stretches uninterrupted over 120 kilometers which is the longest in the world. Again, Sundarbans is the largest mangrove forest in the world, situated on the south-western part of the country under the districts of Bagerhat, Khulna and SaBDThira. The forest is very famous for the Royal Bengal Tigers and dotted Chitra deer.  

Bangladesh finds itself at the low end of most global rankings on governance and anti-corruption. However, Bangladesh has managed to maintain relative peace and political stability. Economic performance has been relatively strong within this challenging governance environment. Only two-thirds to three-quarters of the Annual Development Plan (ADP) are implemented each year.

Administrative divisions of Bangladesh

Bangladesh is divided into eight administrative divisions, each named after their respective divisional headquarters: Barisal, Chattogram, Dhaka, Khulna, Rajshahi, Mymenshingh, Sylhet and Rangpur. Divisions are subdivided into districts (zilas). There are 64 districts in Bangladesh, each further subdivided into upazilas (subdistricts) or thana. The area within each police station, except for those in metropolitan areas, is divided into several unions, with each union consisting of multiple villages. In the metropolitan areas, police stations are divided into wards, which are further divided into mahallas. There are no elected officials at the divisional, district or upazila levels, and the administration is composed only of government officials. Direct elections are held for each union (or ward), electing a chairperson and a number of members. In 1997, a parliamentary act was passed to reserve three seats (out of 12) in every union for female candidates.

Dhaka is the capital and largest city of Bangladesh. Other major cities like Chattogram, Khulna, Rajshahi, Sylhet, Barisal, Bogura, Mymensingh and Rangpur are the divisional city hubs. These divisional cities including some other district cities have mayoral elections, while other municipalities elect a chairperson. Both Mayors and chairpersons are elected for a tenure of five years.


Find the country in the generic links below:

Wikipedia information on Bangladesh

IMF information on Bangladesh

Economist Intelligence Unit information on Bangladesh*

(note - this is a paid service)


Humanitarian Info:

WFP information on Bangladesh

UNOCHA information on Bangladesh


Facts and Figures:

Wolfram Alpha information on Bangladesh

World Bank information on Bangladesh

World Population Review information on Bangladesh

1.1 Bangladesh Humanitarian Background

Disaster Overview

The combination of the high number of disaster events, an increasing human vulnerability resulting from demographic pressure, poverty, social inequality, and the apprehended climate changes indicate that Bangladesh is, permanently, at high risk to large scale disasters with consequent impact on human health and survival. Substantial reduction of risks related to natural and human induced disasters through enhanced capacity to effectively manage emergencies are some of the priority needs of the country.

The geographical location and topographical features of Bangladesh have exposed the country to almost all kinds of natural hazards and human induced disasters. The monsoon weather brings in tornados and cyclones affecting the entire country with high tidal upsurges at the coastal belts during March-June and October-December, and due to heavy rainfall in the country as well as in the northern Indian states of Assam and Maghalaya, floods occur almost every year affecting almost two thirds of the country during the months of July to October. Although significant earthquakes or tsunamis have not taken place in Bangladesh for over 100 years, a considerable part of the country falls under  an earthquake zone and mild tremors continues to occur in the southern parts of the country without any significant casualties or life loss, so far, but the country remains at threat of moderate to major earthquakes along with disasters like tsunami.

Major Hazards of Bangladesh

A range of factors such as over population, social inequality, escalated environmental degradation and rapid urbanization is considerably increasing the impact of disasters on human health and survival in the country demanding a more complex nature of emergency response in recent times. Moreover, the economic burden of poverty and demographic pressures are making a vast majority of people more vulnerable by forcing them to migrate to high risk areas such as flood plains and far flung islands which are normally not suitable for human settlement. The arsenic contamination of drinking water is now gradually evolving as a new public health emergency of a scale never witnessed before. At the same time, the country is at risk of being inundated, at-least ten percent of its land mass with in the first half of this century due to rising sea levels as a result of climate change.

Climate change adds a new dimension to community risk and vulnerability. Although the magnitude of these changes may appear to be small, they could substantially increase the frequency and intensity of existing climatic events (floods, droughts, cyclones, etc.). Current indications are that not only flood and cyclones will become more severe, they will also start to occur outside of their “established seasons”. Events, such as drought, may not have previously occurred in some areas and may now be experienced.

Natural Disasters

Flood including flash flood, cyclone & tidal surge, tornado, river erosion, landslides, earthquake, drought, etc. are some of the major natural disasters that are experienced in Bangladesh. Following are the details of such disasters:

Natural Disasters

Yes/No

Comments / Details

Drought

Yes

Every five years, Bangladesh is affected by major country-wide droughts. However, local droughts occur regularly and affect crop production. The agricultural drought, linked to soil moisture scarcity, occurs at different stages of crop growth, development and reproduction. Monsoon failure often brings famine to the affected regions and as a result crop production reduces drastically. Northwestern regions of Bangladesh are particularly exposed to droughts.

A strong drought can cause greater than 40% damage to aus crop. During the kharif (monsoon) season, it causes significant destruction to the aman crop in approximately 2.32 million hectare (ha) every year. In the rabi season, about 1.2 million ha of agricultural land face droughts of different magnitudes. Apart from the agricultural loss, droughts have important effect on livestock population, land degradation, health and employment. Between 1960 and 1991, drought events occurred 19 times in Bangladesh. Very strong droughts hit the country in 1961, 1975, 1981, 1982, 1984, 1989, 1994, and 2000. Past droughts have naturally affected about 53% of the population and 47% of the country. The associated crop production decline, lower employment opportunities and losses of assets contributed to raise household food insecurity. Droughts cause major problem in household health because its subsequent impact of decreasing food consumption leads to significant increases in illnesses. It also causes an increase in chronic energy deficiency among the agricultural workers.

Drought affects not only seasonal crops, but also fruit-bearing trees, forestry and the environment as a whole. Moreover, the crop environment during the monsoon season is not favorable for achieving full potential yields because of uneven distribution of rainfall, flooding, etc.

To combat drought, it is essential for Bangladesh to utilize its water resources, both surface and groundwater. However, Bangladesh has increasingly used her groundwater resources to such an extent that the depletion of groundwater resources as well as arsenic contamination is occurring at alarming rate in the ground water reservoirs due to over and unplanned withdrawal.

Basically, there are three types of droughts in Bangladesh:

  • Permanent drought characterizes regions with the driest climate, having sparse vegetation that is adapted to aridity. Agriculture cannot be practiced without irrigation.
  • Seasonal drought occurs due to abnormal rainfall shortage in places where there are well defined annual rainy and dry seasons.
  • Unpredictable drought involves an abnormal rainfall failure, mostly in localized areas of humid and sub-humid climates.

Drought conditions due to deficiency in rainfall affect different parts of Bangladesh mostly during the pre-monsoon and post-monsoon periods. Drought conditions never affect the entire country and total population in any drought year.

Earthquakes

Yes

Every year the country experiences natural disasters like cyclones, floods, droughts, earthquakes, riverbank erosions etc. But among those, Bangladesh is more threatened by earthquakes and studies also corroborate this. Bangladesh is surrounded mostly by India and to a lesser extent by Myanmar and lies where three tectonic plates-Eurasia, India, and Burma meet making it one of the most tectonically active regions in the world. In the past 200 years, Bangladesh has experienced many devastating as well as mild earthquakes. After the independence in 1971, Bangladesh has been shaken up by more than 250 earthquakes and some of those were greater than 6.0 magnitude. Studies have also shown the possibilities of losses of life. The occurrence of an earthquake in an earthquake prone region can never be prevented and there is no prior prediction to the earthquake as well but by studying critically, issue warning, implementing the management techniques of settlements for both pre-disaster preparedness and post-disaster management, we can minimize the losses of lives and properties. The Government of Bangladesh is aware of this risk and in the recent years, many awareness growing campaigns have been organized.

In the recent past, a number of tremors of moderate to severe intensity had already taken place in and around Bangladesh. Some are seen from the table below (magnitude 6 and above):

Date

Historical Name

Magnitude

10th January 1869

Cachar earthquake

7.39

14th July 1885

Bengal Earthquake

7

10th January 1889

Meghalaya Earthquake

7.5

12th June 1897

Great Indian Earthquake

8

18th July 1918

The Srimangal Earthquake

7.6

9th September 1923

Meghalaya Earthquake

7.1

3rd July 1930

The Dubri Earthquake

7.1

15th August 1950

The Assam Earthquake

8.7

11th August 2009

The Bay of Bengal Earthquake

7.5

24th August 2016

The Myanmar Earthquake

6.8


Earthquake emergency preparedness plans are far beyond the ones for cyclones and floods. Nevertheless, awareness about the danger of major earthquakes is currently ongoing at all levels, including government and the humanitarian community, resulting in various contingency planning efforts and simulations exercises. 

Tsunamis

Yes

Because of their destructiveness, tsunamis have important impacts on the human, social, and economic sectors of societies. The last major Pacific-wide tsunami occurred in 1960. Many other local and regional destructive tsunamis have occurred with more localized effects.

Before the Asia Tsunami 2004, a few Bangladeshis ever thought that Bangladesh was vulnerable to tsunami hazards. However, the 2004 Asia Tsunami raised the question why Bangladesh was not hit by the Tsunami. Bangladeshi scientists put together the following reasons:

  • Distance from the epicenter
  • Long continental shelf (about 200 km) at the front of Ganges- Brahmaputra active Delta
  • System layout of plates
  • Thick sedimentation in Bengal fan
  • High density of seawater in Bay of Bengal around / along the coast (suspended load)
  • Anti-clockwise oceanic current at Bay of Bengal (winter season)

Considering the state of tsunami vulnerability and potential seismic sources, the geological survey of Bangladesh has divided the Bangladesh coastal belt into three zones:

  • Tsunami Vulnerable Zone- I (Chattogram-Teknaf coastline): Most vulnerable. The intra-deltaic coastline is very close to the tectonic interface of Indian and Burmese plates. The active Andaman-Nicobar fault system is often capable of generating tsunami waves.
  • Tsunami Vulnerable Zone- II (Sundarban-Barisal coastline): Moderately vulnerable. This old deltaic belt is extremely vulnerable to local tsunamis due to presence of the Swatch of No Ground
  • Tsunami Vulnerable Zone- III (Barisal-Sandwip estuarine coastline): Low vulnerability.

The estuarine coastal belt considered to be less vulnerable due to presence of numerous islets and shoals in the upper regime of the continental shelf.

Bangladesh needs detailed study to scientifically assess the Tsunami vulnerability (this is done for the Banda Aceh area). Bangladesh also needs to develop a Tsunami early warning system and mass awareness of Tsunami threat at the coastal areas.

Epidemics

Yes

Every year new infectious diseases are included as emerging diseases and also some considered as eradicated or controlled may start to reappear.

The list of emerging and reemerging diseases includes pandemic influenza, avian influenza, Nipah virus, HIV/AIDS, viral hepatitis, poliomyelitis, Dengue, Kala azar, enteric fever, anthrax, leptospirosis, diarrhea, ARI, etc.

Malaria is endemic in 13 districts of the Northern and Eastern parts of the country.

Kala-azar has been prevailing for centuries as an endemic disease. Control measures for malaria have a significant impact on Kala-azar too. The outbreak began in 2000. Case fatality rates are decreasing.

Filariasis is endemic in the whole country, particularly in the North. It is estimated that 70 million people are at risk while 10 million live with clinical deformity and another 10 million with micro flummeries.

Diarrhea is highly present in the whole country with thousands of deaths yearly.

HIV/AIDS prevalence remains low, with rates between 0,1% (general population) and 1% (populations at risk) = 16.000 cases approx.

Extreme temperatures

Yes

During the winter season, cold weather causes suffering among the elderly, homeless, young children and the vulnerable poor. The northern part of the country is particularly affected.

Climate changes consequences tend to demonstrate an increased occurrence of cold waves.

Floods

Yes

Bangladesh is prone to flooding due to its location on the Ganges Delta and the many distributaries flowing into the Bay of Bengal. Coastal flooding, combined with the bursting of riverbanks is common, and severely affects the landscape and society of Bangladesh. 80% of Bangladesh is floodplain and it has an extensive sea coastline, rendering the nation very much at risk of periodic widespread damage. Whilst more permanent defenses, strengthened with reinforced concrete, are being built, many embankments are composed purely of soil and turf and made by local farmers. Flooding normally occurs during the monsoon season from June to September. The convectional rainfall of the monsoon is added to by relief rainfall caused by the Himalayas. Meltwater from the Himalayas is also a significant input.

Floods are annual phenomena, with the most severe occurring during the months of July and August.

Regular river floods affect 20% of the country, increasing up to 68% in extreme years. The floods of 1988, 1998, 2004 and 2007 were particularly catastrophic, resulting in large-scale destruction and loss of lives.

Approximately 37%, 43%, 52% and 68% of the country is inundated with floods of return periods of 10, 20, 50 and 100 years respectively (MPO, 1986). Four types of flooding occur in Bangladesh.

  • Flash floods caused by overflowing of hilly rivers in eastern and northern Bangladesh (in April-May and September-November).
  • Rain floods caused by drainage congestion and heavy rains.
  • Monsoon floods caused by major rivers usually in the monsoon (during June-September).
  • Coastal floods caused by storm surges.

Each year in Bangladesh about 26,000 square kilometers (around 18% of the country) is flooded, killing over 5,000 people and destroying more than seven million homes. During severe floods the affected area may exceed 75% of the country, as was seen in 1998. This volume is 95% of the total annual inflow. By comparison, only about 187 trillion l (1.87×1011 m3; 6.6×1012 cu ft) of streamflow is generated by rainfall inside the country during the same period.

Floods continue to be major hazards in Bangladesh. To mitigate the impacts of floods, the government has been developing and implementing various measures to better equip the country to deal with floods. The Ministry of Water Resources (MoWR) is leading the country on flood mitigation initiatives.

Insect infestations

Yes

Due to climatic conditions and insufficient or inadequate cultivation and storage conditions, insect infestation regularly contaminate agricultural or fisheries productions.

Riverbank erosion / slides

Yes

Riverbank erosion is an ongoing permanent disaster. As there is no specific indicator to measure the extent of damage, the extent of damage caused by river erosion in most cases is only based on received reports/information. Needless to say, whatever the difference in ascertaining, the extent of damage river erosion causes huge loss of property throughout the year. According to “World Disaster Report 2001” published by IFRCS every year about 1,000,000 people are affected by river erosion and 10,000-hectare cultivable lands are banished in river. Among these only a few affected people are able to find new shelters while others become homeless for uncertain periods.

River erosion in Bangladesh is no less dangerous than other sudden and devastating calamities. Though losses are slow and gradual, they are more destructive and far-reaching than other sudden and devastating calamities. The effects of river erosion are long-term. It takes a few decades to make up the losses, which a family has incurred by river erosion.

Rivers in Bangladesh are morphologically highly dynamic. The main rivers are braided, and form islands or chars between the braiding channels. These chars, of which many are inhabited, "move with the flow" and are extremely sensitive to changes in the river conditions. Erosion processes are highly unpredictable, and not compensated by accretion. These processes also have dramatic consequences in the lives of people living in those areas. A study concluded in 1991 reported that: out of the 462 administrative units in the country, 100 were subject to some form of riverbank erosion, of which 35 were serious, and affected about 1 million people on a yearly basis. The erosion prone zones of Bangladesh are shown in the Figure below. Erosion of total area and settlement is higher along the left bank than that of the right bank.

River erosion is a major challenge to the people in 51 out of 64 districts in the country, representing significant threat to the lives and livelihoods of vast number of populations. The people who are rich in the morning become poor in the evening because of river erosion. Long-term impact of river erosion is catastrophic for the families and the country as most of the victims migrate to urban areas mainly to Dhaka for shelter. Most of the slum dwellers in the capital city and other cities and towns are river affected people. Those who do not come to Dhaka lead a miserable life on dams, roads, deserted houses or under open sky.

Landslides


Yes

In the past, landslide was not considered a major hazard in Bangladesh. However, recently landslide has emerged as a major hazard, particularly after the Chattogram Landslide 2007 that killed more than 120 people.

Landslides are a complex-disaster phenomenon that can be caused by earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, heavy rainfall (typhoons, hurricanes), sustained rainfall, heavy snowmelt, unregulated anthropogenic developments, mining, and others. In Bangladesh, landslides are mostly triggered by heavy rainfall. However, underlying causes of landslide include deforestation, hill cutting, unregulated development work, etc. Moreover, poverty and landlessness force poor people to live in the risky hillslopes.

Volcanoes

No


Cyclones/ Wave/Surge

Yes

Tropical cyclones from the Bay of Bengal accompanied by storm surges are one of the major disasters in Bangladesh. The country is one of the worst sufferers of all cyclonic casualties in the world. The high number of casualties is due to the fact that cyclones are always associated with storm surges. Storm surge height in excess of 9m is not uncommon in this region. The 1970 cyclone is the deadliest cyclone that has hit Bangladesh coastline. With a wind-speed of about 224 km per hour and associated storm surge of 6.1 to 9.11m, it was responsible for deaths of about 300 to 500,000 people.

Extreme cyclone events are now occurring more frequently in Bangladesh. Bangladesh experienced 52 severe cyclones from 1960 to 2010 where, the approximate percentage of storm surge impact is 40%, the largest in the world. Severe cyclones in 1970 and 1991 caused loss of 300,000 and 200,000 lives. It is reported that 210,000, 36,000, and 3500 tons of boro rice, aus rice and other food crops (e.g. potatoes and vegetables) were totally destroyed by 1991 cyclone. The storm surge killed large numbers of livestock and caused loss of 100% of freshwater fish. More recently, the super cyclonic storm SIDR (2007) and AILA (2009) affected 10,000 and 300,000 people, respectively. Apart from these, cyclones NARGIS (2008) and MOHASEN (2013) are also mentionable. The crop production in the coastal regions of Bangladesh is most vulnerable by cyclones while, sea level rise by 2050 will inundate 17.7% of southern coastal areas. Tropical cyclones could become more frequent with more strength under recent climate change conditions. In this research, a new dimension of extreme weather assessment is done combining GCM and GIS technology and using tropospheric instability indices. The thermodynamic environment, vertical instability characteristics of severe cyclones are indispensable to cope with climate change conditions, and for planning, disaster management, and to reduce the risk of food insufficiency. Some of the major cyclones that affected Bangladesh are as follows:


14–15 May 2007

Cyclone Akash

struck about 115 km south of Chattogram with wind speeds up to 120 km/hour. 14 people were killed, and damages amounted to US$982 million.

15 November 2007

Cyclone Sidr

with wind speeds up to 260 km/hour, made landfall on southern Bangladesh, causing over 3,500 deaths and severe damage

26–27 October 2008

  Cyclone Rashmi

made landfall on the Bangladesh coast late on 26 October with wind speeds up to 85 km/hour, 15 people were killed, and thousands of homes were also damaged

19–21 April 2009

 Cyclone Bijli

attacked weakly in Bangladesh and no severe damages were recorded except some houses and crop fields losses

27–29 May 2009

Cyclone Aila

attacked offshore 15 districts of south-western part of Bangladesh with wind speeds up to 120 km/hour; about 150 persons killed, 2 lac houses and 3 lac acres of cultivated land and crops losses

16–17 May 2013

 Cyclone Viyaru

formerly known as Cyclonic Storm Mahasen, hit near Chattogram with wind speeds up to 85 km/hour. 17 people died, and nearly 1.3 million were affected across the country. Losses to crops exceeded US$5.14 million

29 July 2015

 Cyclone Komen

with wind speeds up to 75 km/hour, Komen made landfall near Chattogram. About 510,000 houses in the country were damaged or destroyed, and many residents lost their source of income as 667,221 acres (270,000 ha) of crop fields were damaged. The floods killed 132 people, of which at least 39 were directly related to Komen

21 May 2016

 Cyclone Roanu

made landfall near Chattogram killing 26 people in Bangladesh. It has wind speeds up to 100 km/hour. Around 40,000 homesteads and business houses were damaged. Food storage, seasonal crops were damaged. Livestock, including fish and shrimp firms were swept away

20 August 2016

Tropical Storm Dianmu

 affected Bangladesh, no damage or death were reported

29–31 May 2017

 Cyclone Mora

with wind speeds up to 110 km/hour, made landfall near Chattogram. A total of 500,000 people managed to move out of coastal areas before the storm made landfall on 31 May. But at least 20,000 houses were damaged in refugee camps. At least 20 people were reported to be killed across Bangladesh, mostly due to falling trees and drowning.

03-05 May 2019

Cyclone Fani

Coastal and riverine areas were most affected by the storm, with house collapses and the falling of trees being the most common cause of injury or death. A total 17 people were killed across 10 districts in Bangladesh.

Wild fires

No

Due to the important deforestation, the incidence of forest fires in Bangladesh is considered as insignificant. The teak forests of the Chattogram Hill Tracts (CHT) face regular fires set intentionally for cultivation purposes.

Tornado/Wind storm

Yes

There are severe local seasonal storms, popularly known as nor’westers (kalbaishakhi). Severe nor’westers are generally associated with tornadoes. Tornadoes are embedded within a mother thundercloud and moves along the direction of the squall of the mother storm. The frequency of devastating nor’westers usually reaches the maximum in April, while a few occur in May and in March. Nor’westers and tornadoes are more frequent in the afternoon. Nor’westers may occur in late February due to early withdrawal of winter from Bangladesh, Bihar, West Bengal, Assam, and adjoining areas. The occasional occurrence of nor’westers in early June is due to the delay in the onset of the southwest monsoon over the region (Karmakar, 1989).

Wind speeds in nor’westers usually do not exceed 113-130 km/hr (70-80 miles/hr), although speeds exceeding 162 km/hr (100 miles/hr) have occurred. When the winds become whirling with funnel shaped clouds having a speed of several hundred kilometers or miles per hour, they are called tornados. Nor’westers bring the much-needed pre-monsoon rain. They can also cause a lot of havoc and destruction. Tornados are suddenly formed and are extremely localized in nature and of brief duration. Thus, it is very difficult to locate them or forecast their occurrence with the techniques available at present.

Arsenic Contamination

Yes

At present, arsenic contamination is considered to be a dangerous environmental threat and is identified as a public health emergency in Bangladesh. There is no specific treatment for chronic arenicolids other than ceasing further intake of arsenic contaminated water and raising awareness of the population about the problem.

The value (recommended limit) for arsenic in drinking water as per the guideline of the World Health Organization (WHO) is 10 mg/L while the national standard in most countries, including Bangladesh, is 50 mg/L. With varying levels of contamination from region to region, groundwater in 61 out of the 64 districts in Bangladesh is contaminated with arsenic.

According to a study conducted by the British Geological Survey and DPHE, Bangladesh, arsenic concentrations in the country range from less than 0.25 mg/L to more than 1600 mg/L. This study report estimates that out of the Bangladesh population, up to 57 million people drink water that has an arsenic concentration greater than the WHO guideline value and up to 35 million people consume water that has concentrations in excess of the Bangladesh standard. The waters in the southwest and southeast parts of Bangladesh are highly contaminated with arsenic (map below). Important government initiatives to mitigate risk to arsenic contamination include development of the National Policy for Arsenic Mitigation 2003 and the Implementation Plan for Arsenic Mitigation in Bangladesh.

Saline water intrusion

Yes

Saline water intrusion is mostly seasonal in Bangladesh; in winter months the saline front begins to penetrate inland, and the affected areas rise sharply from 10 % in the monsoon to over 40 % of the coastal belt in the dry season. Coastal districts such as SaBDThira, Khulna, Bagerhat, Barguna, Pataskala, and Barisal are victim of salinity intrusions. Agricultural production, fisheries, livestock, and mangrove forests are affected by higher salinity in the dry season. It is observed that dry flow trend has declined as a result of which sea flow (saline water) is traveling far inside the country resulting in contamination both in surface and ground waters. Movement of saline front in the monsoon season (June to September) is seen in this map.

Salinity data from Land Reclamation Program (LRP) and Meghna Estuary Study (MES) indicate an enormous seasonal effect due to the influence of huge freshwater discharge from the Lower Meghna River on the horizontal distribution of salinity in the estuary. This distribution is strongly influenced by the freshwater flow in the Lower Meghna River. Figures below present the movement of the salinity line during monsoon and dry season. High salinity both in monsoon and dry season in the southwest corner and along the Pussur-Sibsa system of the area is associated with the decreasing upstream freshwater flow as well as silting of major channels.

Movement of saline front in the dry season (November to May) is seen in the Map.

Lean Employment


 

There are apparently two lean seasons in Bangladesh in terms of employment opportunities for the rural area. Northern part of Bangladesh is relatively more affected due to these lean seasons. These seasons are generally March-April and September-October of the year. Earlier, this September-October was often known as “Monga Season”. During this period, agricultural activities are somewhat limited. However, over the years due to diversified agricultural activities and due to several social safety net programmes of Government, along with different activities sponsored by UN/INGO/NGO, the situation has improved.       


Human-induced/Biological/Technological

Road & river traffic accident, epidemics, fire, buildings collapse, gas field explosion, political conflicts, etc. are some of the major human made disasters:

Refugees in country

Yes

Rohingya refugees in Bangladesh are Rohingya people who have fled from Myanmar and are living in Bangladesh. An estimated 745,000 Rohingya—including more than 400,000 children—have fled into Cox’s Bazar, where many people found temporary shelter in refugee camps.

As of March 2019, over 909,000 stateless Rohingya refugees reside in Ukhiya and Teknaf Upazilas. The vast majority live in 34 extremely congested camps, including the largest single site, the Kutupalong-Balukhali Expansion Site, which is host to approximately 626,500 Rohingya refugees.

Social Instability Yes

Social instability is frequent in Bangladesh due to conflicting political interest groups, including students’ unrest.

The Chittagong Hill Tracts (CHT) has observed some intenrnal conflicts for several years, which was followed by a Peace Accord signed between the Bangladesh Government and United People's Party of the Chittagong Hill Tracts on 2 December 1997. The accord allowed for the recognition of the rights of the peoples and tribes of CHT region and ended the decades-long insurgency between the Shanti Bahini and Government forces. There is a presence of large number of security forces in the CHT to maintain law and order situation. Sometimes special permission for the International/UN official are required to visit the CHT.

International conflict

No


Landmines casualties

No



Calamities and Seasonal Effects on Transportation

Transport Means

Comments

Primary Road Transport

Road transport may be affected during both industrial (garment, jute), agricultural (rice, jute, fruits) and fisheries (shrimps) peak seasons. In addition, during Eid holidays, particularly one week before the Eid, there is scarcity of transport capacity on the road. These vary from places to places and are only due to a temporary scarcity of transport means.

The monsoon season may also affect road transports temporarily and locally. During massive disasters, a scarcity of transport means is probable and is often faced.

Secondary Road Transport


Rail Transport

Rail transportation system remains normal except during any of the natural calamities and incidents. During Eid holidays rail transport becomes very vulnerable.

Air Transport

Air transportation is normal except in severe natural calamities.

Waterways Transport

In Bangladesh about two-thirds of the land is vulnerable to flooding. Most areas remain under water for two to five months a year. As a result, costs of development and maintenance of roads and railways are high. On the other hand, inland water transport has always been a natural and relatively cheaper means of transport. In certain areas, it is the only mode of transport. Including the country's unclassified routes, the total length of its waterway (700 rivers) is about 13,000 km. Of this, 8,433 km is navigable by larger vessels in the rainy season (5,968 km of which is classified for navigation) while in the dry season about 4,800 km is navigable (classified 3,865 km).


Capacities to Respond to Disasters/Emergencies

Coordination Mechanisms

The Department of Disaster Management (DDM), under the Ministry of Disaster Management and Relief (MoDMR) of the Government of Bangladesh has the responsibility for coordinating national disaster management efforts across all agencies. In January 1997 the Ministry issued the Standing Orders on Disaster (SODs) to guide and monitor disaster management activities in Bangladesh. These SODs were revised once in 2010 and again in 2019, which is awaiting to be published. Basically, 3 institutions are responsible for the coordination of disaster response in Bangladesh at the national level: The National Disaster Management Council (NDMC)- responsible for strategic decisions for disaster management; the Inter- Ministerial Disaster Management Committee (IMDMC)- responsible for coordination across ministries; and the National Disaster Management Advisory Committee- responsible for policy development and advice. The NDMC is the highest-level decision-making body for disaster management in Bangladesh. Coordination at District, Thana and Union levels will be done by the respective District, Thana and Union Disaster Management Committees. The Department of Disaster Management (DDM) will render all assistance to them by facilitating the process. A series of inter-related institutions, at both national and sub-national levels have been created to ensure effective planning and coordination of disaster risk reduction and emergency response management.

Following the 2015 Nepal Earthquake, the GoB decided to establish a National Emergency Operation Centre (NEOC) to respond effectively to the severe disastrous situations of the unanticipated event. In 2015, a National Emergency Operations Center (NEOC), also termed National Disaster Response Coordination Center (NDRRC), was established at the Secretariat of the MoDMR as a coordination mechanism for disaster response. Emergency operations centers can also be activated at the district levels for the management and coordination of the response through strategic deployment of staff to the field as well as coordination with various clusters and working groups. Ministry of Foreign Affairs (MoFA) also coordinates any incoming humanitarian assistance. It coordinates requests for international assistance as directed by the government and NDMC. For further details pl click http://www.ddm.gov.bd/.

National Disaster Management Council (NDMC)

At the apex level, the National Disaster Management Council is established to provide policy guidance towards disaster risk reduction and emergency response management in Bangladesh. The Council is multi-sectoral and inter-disciplinary in nature, with public, private and civil society participation involving all concerned entities within a country including representation from the United Nations.


Membership of the NDMC (as per the revised SOD 2019)

1.        

Honorable Prime Minister

Chairperson

2.        

Minister, Ministry of Local Government, Rural Development and Cooperatives

Member

3.        

Minister, Ministry of Agriculture

4.        

Minister, Ministry of Home Affairs

5.        

Minister, Ministry of Road Transport and Bridges

‘’

6.        

Minister, Ministry of Health and Family Welfare

‘’

7.        

Minister, Ministry of Disaster Management and Relief (MoDMR)

8.        

Minister, Ministry of Water Resources

9.        

Minister, Ministry of Housing and Public Works

10.     

Minister, Ministry of Shipping

11.     

Minister, Ministry of Railways

12.     

Minister, Ministry of Science and Technology

13.     

Minister, Ministry of Food

14.     

Minister, Ministry of Environment, Forest and Climate Change

15.     

Chairman, National Disaster Management Advisory Committee

16.     

Chief of Army Staff

17.     

Chief of Naval Staff

18.     

Chief of Air Staff

‘’

19.     

Principal Secretary at Prime Minister’s Office

‘’

20.     

Principle Staff Officer, Armed Forces Division

21.     

Secretary, Economic Division

22.     

Secretary, Ministry of Water Resources

23.     

Secretary, Bangladesh Bridge Authority

24.     

Secretary, Ministry of Agriculture

25.     

Secretary, Bangladesh Local Government Division

26.     

Secretary, Health Services Division

27.     

Secretary, Medical Education and Family Welfare Division

28.     

Secretary, Public Security Division

29.     

Secretary, Security Services Division

30.     

Secretary, Ministry of Defence

31.     

Secretary, Secondary and Higher Education Division

‘’

32.     

Secretary, Technical and Madrasa Education Division

‘’

33.     

Secretary, Ministry of Primary and Mass Education

34.     

Secretary, Road Transport and Highways Division

35.     

Secretary, Railways Division

36.     

Secretary, Ministry of Shipping

37.     

Secretary, Information Ministry

38.     

Secretary, Disaster Management & Relief Division (DM&RD)

39.     

Secretary, Ministry of Food

40.     

Secretary, Ministry of Land

41.     

Secretary, Ministry of Housing and Public Works

42.     

Secretary, Ministry of Fisheries and Livestock

43.     

Secretary, Ministry of Environment and Forests

44.     

Bangladesh Police Head Quarters, Bangladesh Police

45.     

Director General, Department of Disaster Mangemet

46.     

Director General, Border Guards Bangladesh

47.     

Director General, Rapid Action Battalion

48.     

Director General, Bangladesh Ansar and Village Defense Party

49.     

Director General, Bangladesh Coast Guard

50.     

Director General, Bangladesh Fire Service and Civil Defence

51.     

Chairman, Bangladesh Space Research and Remote Sensing Organization

52.     

Cabinet Secretary

Member-Secretary


Meetings of the NDMC

The Council will meet at least once a year. It may co-opt any other members, if it deems fit and proper. The Council may invite any experts or professionals for briefing and expert opinion. The Council may constitute any committee to recommend policy, programming and/or implementation measures regarding disaster risk reduction and emergency response management. Decisions of the Council meetings will be implemented by the Inter-Ministerial Disaster Management Coordination Committee (IMDMCC).

 

Responsibilities of NDMC

  • Review national disaster management system and provide strategic advice for disaster risk reduction and emergency response management.
  • Review policy and planning documents on disaster management and provide strategic advice.
  • Promote dialogue across sectors with a view to integrate disaster risk reduction into sectoral development plans and programs.
  • Promote awareness regarding disaster risk reduction among top policy makers.
  • Evaluate disaster preparedness measures and provide strategic advice.
  • Evaluate response and recovery measures, particularly after a large-scale disaster and provide strategic direction towards improvement of the system and procedures.
  • Facilitate coordination of multi-hazard and multi-sectoral measures in relation to disaster risk reduction and emergency response management.

 

At the national level                    

  • National Disaster Management Council (NDMC) headed by the Prime Minister to formulate and review the disaster management policies and issue directives to all concerns.
  • Inter-Ministerial Disaster Management Co-ordination Committee (IMDMCC) headed by the Minister in charge of the MoDMR to implement disaster management policies and decisions of NDMC / Government.
  • National Disaster Management Advisory Committee (NDMAC) headed by an experienced person having been nominated by the Prime Minister.
  • National Platform for Disaster Risk Reduction (NPDRR) headed by Secretary, MoDMR and DG, DDM functions as the member secretary. This platform shall coordinate and provide necessary facilitation to the relevant stakeholders.
  • Earthquake Preparedness and Awareness Committee (EPAC) headed by Minister for MoDMR and DG, DDM act as member secretary.
  • Cyclone Preparedness Program Implementation Board (CPPIB) headed by the Secretary, MoDMR to review the preparedness activities in the face of initial stage of an impending cyclone.
  • Cyclone Preparedness Program (CPP) Policy Committee headed by Minister, MoDMR and Secretary, MoDMR act as member secretary.
  • Disaster Management Training and Public Awareness Building Task Force (DMTATF) headed by the Director General, DDM to coordinate the disaster related training and public awareness activities of the Government, NGOs and other organizations.
  • Focal Point Operation Coordination Group of Disaster Management (FPOCG) headed by the Director General of DDM to review and coordinate the activities of various departments/agencies related to disaster management and also to review the Contingency Plan prepared by concerned departments.
  • NGO Coordination Committee on Disaster Management (NGOCC) headed by the Director General of DDM to review and coordinate the activities of concerned NGOs in the country.
  • Committee for Speedy Dissemination of Disaster Related Warning/ Signals (CSDDWS) headed by the Director General of DDM to examine, ensure and find out the ways and means for the speedy dissemination of warning/ signals among the people.

 

At the Sub-national levels

  • District Disaster Management Committee (DDMC) headed by the Deputy Commissioner (DC) to coordinate and review the disaster management activities at the District level.
  • Upazila Disaster Management Committee (UZDMC) headed by the Upazila Nirbahi Officer (UNO) to coordinate and review the disaster management activities at the Upazila level.
  • Union Disaster Management Committee (UDMC) headed by the Chairman of the Union Parishad to coordinate, review and implement the disaster management activities of the concerned Union.
  • Pourashava Disaster Management Committee (PDMC) headed by Chairman of Pourashava (municipality) to coordinate, reviews and implements the disaster management activities within its area of jurisdiction.
  • City Corporation Disaster Management Committee (CCDMC) headed by the Mayor of City Corporations to coordinate, review and implement the disaster management activities within its area of jurisdiction.


Disaster Management Regulatory Framework

Bangladesh’s regulative framework for disaster management provides for the relevant legislative, policy and best practice framework under which the activity of Disaster Risk Reduction and Emergency Management in Bangladesh is managed and implemented. The framework includes:


Disaster Management Act

A Disaster Management Act is enacted with a view to create the legislative tool under which disaster risk and emergency management will be undertaken in Bangladesh, and the legal basis in which activities and actions will be managed. It will also create mandatory obligations and responsibilities on Ministries, committees and appointments. The objectives of the Act will be

a) To help communities to mitigate the potential adverse effects of hazard events, prepare for managing the effects of a disaster event, effectively respond to and recover from a disaster or an emergency situation, and adapt to adverse effects of climate change.

b) To provide for effective disaster management for Bangladesh

c) To establish an institutional framework for disaster management.

d) To establish risk reduction as a core element of disaster management.


National Disaster Management Policy

A National Disaster Management Policy is formulated to define the national perspective on disaster risk reduction and emergency management, and to describe the strategic framework, and national principles of disaster management in Bangladesh. It will be of strategic in nature and will describe the broad national objectives, and strategies in disaster management.


Disaster Management Plans

The Bangladesh National Plan for Disaster Management is a strategic document to be effective for a certain period of time. This is an umbrella plan that provides the overall guideline for the relevant sectors and the disaster management committees at all levels to prepare and implement their area of roles specific plans. Additionally, there are a few hazard specific management plans, such as Flood Management Plan, Cyclone and Storm Surge and Tsunami Management Plan, Earthquake Management Plan, Drought Management Plan, River Erosion Management Plan, etc. Moreover, there will be a detailed Disaster Management Plan for each District, Upazila, Union and Pourashava and City Corporation of the country. A District Disaster Management Plan will be the compilation of the Upazila Disaster Management Plans of the District. Similarly, an Upazila Disaster Management Plan are the compilation of the union disaster management plans of that Upazila prepared by the Union DMCs. So DMCs at Union and Pourashava levels will be mainly responsible for conducting the risk assessments and prepare the ground level plans. Once developed those will be sent to the DMCs at one level higher – Upazila DMCs, whose role will be to verify and compile the union plans and identify the resource requirements for the Upazila.


National Plan for Disaster Management

The National Plan for Disaster Management is prepared by the Ministry of Disaster Management and Relief. The plan includes the following as minimum:

  • Introduction
  • GoB Vision for Disaster Management
  • Hazards profile of Bangladesh
  • Disaster development linkages: national and international drivers for change
  • Aim of the plan
  • Strategic goals of the plan
  • Conceptualizing disaster management in Bangladesh
  • Disaster management system in Bangladesh.

The roles and responsibilities of entities involved in emergency operations and risk reduction:

  • Disaster management regulative framework
  • Action matrix for disaster risk reduction and emergency management in
  • Bangladesh describing the priorities and the strategies
  • Review and evaluation
  • Implementation and follow-up
  • Financing of the plan
  • Other matters relating to disaster management as deemed necessary by appropriate authority for inclusion in the plan

The Plan is to be used to:

  • Articulate the long-term strategic focus of disaster management in Bangladesh.
    • Demonstrate a commitment to address key issues: risk reduction, capacity building, information management, climate change adaptation, livelihood security, issues of gender and the socially disadvantaged, etc.
    • Show the relationship between the government vision, key result areas, goals and strategies, and to align priorities and strategies with international and national drivers for change.
    • Detail a road map for the development of disaster management plans by various entities.
  • Guide the DM&RD in the development and delivery of guidelines and programs.
    • Illustrate to other ministries, NGOs, civil society and the private sector how their work can contribute to the achievements of the strategic goals and government vision on disaster management.
    • Provide a framework within which to report performance and success in achieving goals and strategies.


District Disaster Management Plan (DDMP)

There is a District Disaster Management Committee (DDMC) at the District level. The DDMC consists of the Deputy Commissioner of the District as the chairperson and members comprising all District level department heads, NGO leaders and civil society members. District Relief and Rehabilitation Officer (DRRO) acts as member secretary of the committee. Members of Parliament act as advisors of the committees. The committee is required to meet bi-monthly during normal period and as and when necessary during emergency situation.

There will be a plan for each District titled “District Disaster Management Plan” comprising both disaster risk reduction and emergency response to be prepared by the District Disaster Management Committee. This is a plan to be prepared by compilation of the Upazila and Pourashava Disaster Management Plans of the District being received from the respective Upazila and Pourashava/City Corporation DMCs. The DDMP should highlight and articulate, among others, the following:

  • The areas in the District vulnerable to different forms of hazards and risks
  • Total resource requirements and the planned action for the District
  • To take measures for prevention and mitigation of disasters by government agencies, NGOs, CBOs and the private sector within the District:
  • Capacity building and preparedness measures to be taken by government agencies, NGOs, CBOs and the private sector.
  • Strengthening emergency response management system plans and procedures in the event of a disaster.
  • The response plans and procedures in the event of a disaster, providing for:
    • Allocation of responsibilities to the departments of the government at
    • District level and other DMC members
    • Procedure for mobilization of resources
    • Prompt response to disaster and relief thereof
    • Procurement of emergency supplies
    • Operation of disaster shelters
    • Restoration of emergency services, such as water supply, gas supply, power, telecommunication, road links
    • Provision of emergency medical services
    • Burial of dead bodies
    • Trauma counseling
    • The dissemination of information
  • Recovery plans and procedures delineating damage assessment procedure, restoration of damaged public infrastructure, resumption of educational institutions, restoration of livelihood, rehabilitation of affected people, especially the disabled, and elderly women and children.
  • The DDMP shall be reviewed and updated annually.
  • The copies of the DDMP shall be made available to all District level stakeholders, Divisional Commissioners, etc.
  • A copy of the DDMP will be sent to the Disaster Management Bureau and all relevant ministries and divisions.
  • The DMB/NDMTI will provide technical advice and capacity building services to all DMCs.


Upazila Disaster Management Plan (UzDMP)

Upazila is an important and vital administrative unit of Bangladesh. There is an Upazila Disaster Management Committee (UZDMC) at the Upazila level. The UzDMC consists of the Upazila Nirbahi Officer as the chairperson and members comprising all Upazila level department heads, NGO leaders and civil society members. The PIO acts as the member secretary of the committee. Members of Parliament act as advisors of the committees. The committee is required to meet bimonthly during normal period and as and when necessary during emergency situation. There will be a plan for each Upazila titled “Upazila Disaster Management Plan” comprising both disaster risk reduction and emergency response to be prepared by the Upazila Disaster Management Committee by compiling all the Union Disaster Management Plans of the Upazila being received from the respective Union DMCs of the Upazila. The UzDMP should highlight and articulate, among others, the following:

  • The areas in the Upazila vulnerable to different forms of hazards and risks.
  • Total resource requirements and the planned action for the District.
    • To take measures for prevention and mitigation of disasters by government agencies, NGOs, CBOs and the private sector within the District
    • Capacity building and preparedness measures to be taken by government agencies, NGOs, CBOs and the private sector.
    • Strengthening emergency response management system plans and procedures in the event of a disaster
  • The response plans and procedures in the event of a disaster, providing for:
    • Allocation of responsibilities to the departments of the government at District level and other DMC members
  • Procedure for mobilization of resources
  • Prompt response to disaster and relief thereof
  • Procurement of emergency supplies
  • Operation of disaster shelters
    • Restoration of emergency services, such as water supply, gas supply, power, road links, telecommunication etc.
  • Provision of emergency medical services
  • Burial of dead bodies
  • Trauma counseling
  • The dissemination of information
  • Recovery plans and procedures delineating damage assessment procedure, restoration of damaged public infrastructure, resumption of educational institutions, restoration of livelihood, rehabilitation of affected people, especially the disabled, and elderly women and children.
  • The UzDMP shall be reviewed and updated annually.
    • The copies of the UzDMP shall be made available to all Upazila level stakeholders and members of DDMCs.
  • A copy of the UzDMP will be sent to the District Disaster Management Committee and DMB.
  • The DMB/BIDMTR will provide technical advice and capacity building services to all DMCs.


Union Disaster Management Plan (UDMP)

Union Parishad is the lowest administrative unit of Bangladesh. There is a Disaster Management Committee at the Union level. The UDMC is chaired by the elected Chairman of the respective Union Parishad. The Union Disaster Management Committee consists of the Union Parishad Chairman as the Chairperson and members comprising all the Government department head at Union level, members of Union Parishad, NGO leaders working in respective union and civil society members. Secretary of the respective Union Parishad acts as the member secretary of the committee. The committee is required to meet bimonthly during normal period and as and when necessary during emergency situation. There will be a plan for each Union titled “Union Disaster Management Plan” comprising both disaster risk reduction and emergency response to be prepared by the Union Disaster Management Committee following a proper community risk assessment procedure to be provided by DM&RD with the participation of vulnerable groups and the communities. The UDMP should highlight and articulate, among others, the following:

  • Defining and redefining community risks to hazards utilizing both traditional and scientific knowledge.
  • Total resource requirements and the planned action for the District.
  • To take measures for prevention and mitigation of disasters by government agencies, NGOs, CBOs and the private sector within the District
  • Capacity building and preparedness measures to be taken by government agencies, NGOs, CBOs and the private sector
  • Strengthening emergency response management system plans and procedures in the event of a disaster
  • The response plans and procedures in the event of a disaster, providing for:
  • Allocation of responsibilities to the departments of the government at District level and other DMC members
    • Procedure for mobilization of resources
    • Prompt response to disaster and relief thereof
    • Procurement of emergency supplies
    • Operation of disaster shelters
    • Restoration of emergency services, such as water supply, gas supply, power, telecommunication, road links
    • Provision of emergency medical services
    • Burial of dead bodies
    • Trauma counseling
    • The dissemination of information
  • Recovery plans and procedures delineating damage assessment procedure, restoration of damaged public infrastructure, resumption of educational institutions, restoration of livelihood, rehabilitation of affected people, especially the disabled, and elderly women and children.
  • The UDMP shall be reviewed and updated annually.
  • The copies of the UDMP shall be made available to all Union level stakeholders, UNOs and DCs.
  • A copy of the UDMP will be sent to the Upazila Disaster Management Committee.
  • The DMB/BIDMTR will provide technical advice and capacity building services to all DMCs.


 Paurashava / City Corporation Disaster Management Plan

Pourashava is at the bottom of the urban administrative tier of Bangladesh. There is a Disaster Management Committee at the City Corporation/Pourashava level. The Pourashava Chairman is the head of the committee. The members of the Committee are all Pourashava commissioners, representatives from all the Government departments, NGOs and CBOs. Chief Executive Officer of the Pourashava is the member secretary of the committee. The committee is required to meet monthly during normal period and as and when necessary during emergency.

Besides, metropolitan cities in Bangladesh have City Corporation Disaster Management Committees with the Mayor as the Chairman and comprising members as it is in case of Pouroshavas.

There will be a plan for each Pourashava/City Corporation titled “Pourashava/City Corporation Disaster Management Plan” to be prepared by the “Pourashava/City Corporation Disaster Management Committee having linkages with the National Plan for Disaster Management. The PDMP/CCDMP should highlight and articulate, among others, the following:

  • The areas in the Pourashava/City Corporation vulnerable to different forms of hazards and risks.
  • Total resource requirements and the planned action for the District.
    • To take measures for prevention and mitigation of disasters by government agencies, NGOs, CBOs and the private sector within the District
    • Capacity building and preparedness measures to be taken by government agencies, NGOs, CBOs and the private sector
    • Strengthening emergency response management system plans and procedures in the event of a disaster
  • The response plans and procedures in the event of a disaster, providing for:
    • Allocation of responsibilities to the departments of the government at District level and other DMC members
    • Procedure for mobilization of resources
    • Prompt response to disaster and relief thereof
    • Procurement of emergency supplies
    • Operation of disaster shelters
    • Restoration of emergency services, such as water supply, gas supply, power, telecommunication, road links
    • Provision of emergency medical services
    • Burial of dead bodies
    • Trauma counselling
    • The dissemination of information
  • Recovery plans and procedures delineating damage assessment procedure, restoration of damaged public infrastructure, resumption of educational institutions, restoration of livelihood, rehabilitation of affected people, especially the disabled, and elderly women and children.
  • The PDMP shall be reviewed and updated annually.
  • The copies of the PDMP shall be made available to all Pourashava/city corporation level stakeholders, UNOs and DCs.
  • A copy of the PDMP will be sent to the District Disaster Management Committee and Disaster Management Bureau.
  • The DMB/ BIDMTR will provide technical advice and capacity building services to all DMCs.

Key Policy Documents on Disaster Management

Disaster Management Act

The Disaster Management Act provides the legal basis for disaster risk reduction and emergency response management in Bangladesh. This Act defines the organizational structure of disaster management at national and local levels and details the responsibilities of all government departments and committees related to the disaster management system.

Standing Orders on Disaster (1997,2010 and revised 2019)

The Standing Orders on Disaster detail the roles and responsibilities of each government body engaged in disaster management – ministries, committees, departments and other organizations. It also provides for the establishment of coordination processes at national and local levels.

National Strategy on the Management of Disaster and Climate-induced Internal Displacement

The strategy outlines processes for the management of climate-induced internal displacement that supports the implementation of the Sendai Framework and the United Nations (UN) Sustainable Development Goals. The strategy focuses on internal displacement caused by natural disasters. It does not address cross-border displacement issues. Three phases are addressed: pre-displacement, displacement and post-displacement.

Guidelines for Government at all Levels (Best Practice Models)

Guidelines for Government at all levels are developed as best practice models, and are used to assist Ministries, NGOs, disaster management committees and civil society in implementing disaster risk management. Guidelines will include, among others:

  • Disaster Impact and Risk Assessment Guideline
  • Local Disaster Risk Reduction Fund Management Guidelines
  • Emergency Fund Management Guidelines
  • Indigenous Coping Mechanism Guidebook
  • Community Risk Assessment Guidelines
  • Damage and Needs Assessment Methodology
  • Hazard Specific Risk Assessment Guidelines
  • Emergency Response and Information Management Guideline
  • Contingency Planning Template
  • Sectoral Disaster Risk Reduction Planning Template
  • Local Level Planning Template
  • National Risk Reduction Fund Management Guideline
  • National Disaster Reduction and Emergency Fund Management Guideline
  • Local Disaster Management Fund Guideline
  • Guideline for Road and Water Safety
  • Guideline for Industrial Safety
  • Guideline for Disaster Shelter Management
  • Monitoring and Evaluation Guideline for the Implementation of the Plan
  • Guideline for International Assistance in Disaster Emergency

Sectoral Development Plans Incorporating Disaster Risk Reduction

Every Ministry/Division of the Government of Bangladesh prepares their respective Sectoral Development Plans. DM&RD with the participation of sectoral experts will prepare a general guideline to incorporate disaster risk reduction agenda for the sectors. DM&RD will also be responsible for overall monitoring and follow-up of the process to ensure that disaster risk reduction agenda are mainstreamed within the sectoral policies, plans and programs. The development plans should address, among others, the following:

  • Defining and redefining risk environment through hazard analysis, vulnerability assessment, risk evaluation, risk treatment options, and risk treatments.
  • Managing the risk environment by developing programs and strategies that eliminate or reduce the level of risk. Traditionally mitigation programs were viewed as engineering solutions to eliminate risk, but it is now accepted that all activities undertaken to eliminate or reduce risk are “mitigation” strategies (e.g. community education and awareness, planning activities, development of warning systems). This includes activities previously described as the PPRR Model- Prevention, Preparedness, Response and Recovery.
  • Regularly review and update the plan.
  • Submit a copy of the plan and of any amendment thereto, to appropriate authority including the DM&RD.
  • Submit a copy of its disaster management plan, and of any amendment thereto, the concerned authority.

Hazard Specific Multi-Sectoral Disaster Management Plans

In addition to area specific disaster management plans and sector specific disaster risk reduction plans, it is envisaged that there will be a few hazard-specific management plans, such as earthquake management plan. This type of plans will be multi-sectoral and will be divided into two components: risk reduction and emergency response. This type of plans will address specific necessities to deal with a particular hazard.

Earthquake Contingency Plan

Over the past decades, urbanization in Bangladesh has been rapidly taking place without proper guidance. As a result, many of the urban centers have developed haphazardly. These urban centers are fast growing and influence the economic developments of the country. It is therefore essential to have a realistic understanding of the nature, severity and consequences of likely damage/loss that a possible earthquake event could cause. A strong earthquake affecting a major urban center like Dhaka, Chattogram, or Sylhet may result in damage and destructions of massive proportions and may have disastrous consequences for the entire nation. In the tectonic map of Bangladesh, Dhaka is near the Modhupur Fault and Plate Boundary Fault 3. The rapid increase in vulnerability of the city is evident from the rapid urbanization, population growth, population migration and development of major economic zones in and around Dhaka. Major causes that lead to a very high seriousness of the risk analysis related to earthquakes, include the haphazard urbanization and sub-standard construction of buildings. During sustained strong shaking, poorly consolidated, water saturated sediments can liquefy and lose their ability to support loads. The foundations and supports of structures built on liquefiable sediments can fail, causing damage or destruction during major earthquakes. Much of the country is of loose sandy soil and most of it remains in saturated condition round the year, thereby increasing the vulnerability to liquefaction in case of sustained ground motions. Possibility of fire outbreaks in the event of an earthquake as a secondary hazard is another source related to possible high economic losses.

Taking into consideration lessons learned and good practices from the 2015 Gorkha earthquake in Nepal, the government of Bangladesh, together with the UN RC and members of the international community agreed to focus preparedness efforts on the occurrence of a large-scale earthquake in Bangladesh in line with the UNDAF 2016-2020 and HCTT annual workplans. According to the latest information and research available, the large urbanization centres of Dhaka, Chattogram and Sylhet are likely to experience the greatest impact of the event in terms of destruction and number of people affected. Based on the average projections of a ‘worst case’ scenario, the possible humanitarian consequences include:

  1. The loss of life for 547,855 persons [164,570 men, 150,050 women, 121,095 boys, 112,139 girls]
  2. Injuries for 726,521 persons [240,045 men, 205,866 women, 150,530 boys, 130,079 girls]
  3. The displacement of 15,770,568 persons [4,841,962 men, 4,353,948 women, 3,436,345 boys, 3,138,313 girls].
  4. A total of 178,794 disabled persons would directly be impacted as well.

This is exacerbated by significant estimated damage to roads and public infrastructure impacting access to public services to affected communities. To optimize the speed, volume and quality of critical humanitarian assistance, the HCTT/UNCT has developed this contingency plan according to the RAPID approach to: 

  1. Reach a common understanding of earthquake risk to ensure early action is taken when required; 
  2. Establish a minimum level of earthquake preparedness across clusters; 
  3. Build the basis for a joint HCTT response strategy to meet the needs of affected people in the first 6 weeks to 3 months of a response; 
  4. Define considerations for detailed contingency planning on the basis of the worst-case scenario, especially around access and logistics; 
  5. Minimize the consequences of secondary disasters after earthquake.

It is evident from the past history of higher intensity earthquake in this region and the mild shakes experienced in recent dates as an initial call for earthquake in major cities of Bangladesh. As such, it is feared that a high intensity earthquake in these cities may result in to serious devastation and collapse the cities. Thus, a well-designed and fully coordinated plan for optimum and efficient preparedness, response and early recovery, usually known as Contingency Plan, in a systematic manner so that their capacities and resources are best utilized to fulfill the need complimenting and supplementing other agencies. Realizing the need of coordinated and comprehensive emergency response, United Nations has been promoting its humanitarian response activities in a cluster approach. In this approach, under National Earthquake Contingency Plan, all response activities are grouped into nine relevant operational functional clusters based on the similarity of works, normal and disaster time mandates of different relevant organizations and possible complementarily in the resources and capacities. The clusters are as follows:

  • Emergency Operations Cluster 1 – Overall Command and Coordination
  • Emergency Operations Cluster 2 – Search, Rescue and Evacuation
  • Health Cluster
  • Relief Services (Food, Nutrition and other Relief) Cluster
  • Shelter (Including Camp Management) Cluster
  • Water Supply, Sanitation and Hygiene Cluster
  • Restoration of Urban Services Cluster
  • Transport (Road, Rail, Air, Sea) Cluster
  • Security and Welfare Cluster

Cyclone Shelter Plan

To face the aforesaid challenges particularly cyclone and tidal surges, different governmental & non-governmental organizations have constructed about 2,852 (CDMP 2009) cyclone shelters in the coastal belts of 16 Districts of the country. Out of 2,852 shelters, investigation reveals that 2,590 shelters are useable while 262 are not. These shelters are insufficient in terms of necessity. So it would not be possible to provide shelter to all the affected people as well as their domestic animals. A survey team captioned as Multipurpose Cyclone Shelter Program (MCSP) headed by Prof. Dr. Jamilur Reza Chowdhury recommended in its report of 1993 to construct 1,250 new cyclone shelter as priority no. 1 and 1,250 as priority no.2 for providing shelters to the affected people during disasters. The report also mentioned that the total number of 2,500 cyclone shelters including primary school, madrashas and secondary schools were proposed to be constructed.

These shelters have been constructed on the government khas land/institution’s land /purchased lands. There is a provision of separate latrine facilities for women. One tube-well for each shelter is set up for supplying pure drinking water. In normal periods, these shelters are being used as educational institution. Each of the Cyclone shelter station can accommodate approx. 800 people during emergency.

It was decided that Bangladesh’s plan of action should be inclusive to multi-hazard, all risk, and all sector approach. Therefore, following technical options are considered as critical element of the plan of action.

  • Comprehensive Risk assessment (Hazard Assessment and Vulnerability Assessment), including tsunami inundation modeling and evacuation mapping;
  • Warning Guidance, including seismic and sea level monitoring, data
  • Evaluation, processing and interpretation, forecasting methods and warning dissemination (a detailed plan of action is prepared);
  • Mitigation and Preparedness, including education and awareness Programs, structural and non-structural mitigations, government policy and emergency management procedures;
  • Development of Rescue, Relief and Rehabilitation Plan of Action based on Comprehensive Risk Assessment, and
  • Existing Cyclone Preparedness Program (CPP) should be strengthened in a way that they can prepare the community for tsunami as well as cyclone.

Management Aspects of Shelter Center in Coastal Zones

DMB proposes the facilitating role of local Disaster Management Committee in forming the Cyclone Center Management Committee for each center. The committee will have the following types of representation:

  • A member of local Disaster Management Committee
  • Locally Elected Representative (UP Member)
  • Head Master of local Primary School
  • Imam of Local Masjid
  • NGO representative
  • Women representative

DMB also propose for multipurpose use of the Cyclone Centers by local NGOs, Civil Society Groups and community people for public functions like marriage ceremonies, meetings, training sessions and other social functions under the supervision of CC Management Committee. The users will pay a minimum fee for using CC as maintenance charge. The Management Committee will be responsible for keeping financial statement of CC.

Disaster Resilient Cluster Housing

Climate change is changing the nature of the acute hazards. Bangladesh is suffering from increased numbers of intensified floods, cyclones and storm surge with higher magnitudes resulting damage of assets, properties, killing life and disrupting livelihoods of the millions living in the impacted areas. The impact areas are also spreading over time and space. In order to provide shelter to the people of the impacted areas to the shelters, Bangladesh needs a large number of new shelters that has already been discussed in the previous chapter. However, people living in the impacted areas are facing extreme weather events one after another, which are going to increase further in the coming future due to climate change. Early warning in the community language having reasonable lead-time is yet to develop and streamlined. Even if the warning is issued, people are not willing to shift to shelters because of many reasons.

First of all, there is a lack of awareness and sensitization, early warning is not clear to them and sometimes misleading, and finally they are hesitant to leave their livelihood-earning assets and properties. In the present situation and in the coming future, more such events may make people fatigued to shift to shelters more frequently. As such, this is the time to create alternative and additional options for the disaster-hit community. One of the alternative approaches is to convert houses into shelters. Government shall develop cluster housing for a group of households that are living in marginalized hazard prone lands, initially in Khas land with necessary utilities and infrastructures that are resilient to the hazards. This set up shall have the provisions for cattle and poultry shelter, seedbeds, and schools on raised land. The architecture shall be such that it will be in a position to accommodate the adversity of the hazard impacts.

Tsunami Response Plan

Following the 2004 Tsunami, and based on several exercises, workshops, seminars and meetings, a detailed draft plan of action is prepared for Bangladesh.

“The disaster management vision of the Government of the People’s Republic of Bangladesh is to reduce the risk of people, especially the poor and the disadvantaged, from the effects of natural, environment and human induced hazards to a manageable and acceptable humanitarian level and to have in place an efficient emergency response management system.” To ensure that the Government has prepared a “National Plan for Disaster Management” integrating all possible natural disasters that might attack Bangladesh, which is awaiting final approval.

Ongoing projects of DDM

In order to protect the human being and reduce the losses of lives and materials lot of humanitarian organizations and NGOs are working along with the Government. Some of the important ongoing project of the govt are as follows:

  1. National Resilience Project
  2. Strengthening of the Ministry of Disaster Management and Relief Program Administration (SMoDMRPA)
  3. Disaster Risk Management and Enhancement Project
  4. Urban Resilience Project
  5. Construction of 12993 Bridges and Culverts in rural area
  6. Construction of heringbon roads in rural area
  7. Construction of Multi-Purpose Cyclone shelters in coastal area
  8. Construction of Flood shelter station in flood prone area
  9. Construction of Mujib Killa- Cattle shelter station
  10. Construction of Relief Godown cum DM Information center in 64 Districts. Subsequently these will be constructed in each Upazilla.

Government Agencies involved in Disaster Management

As per the national policy of the govt, almost all ministries and departments are involved in the national committee for Disasters Management and Relief. Out of them following Ministries and Departments are the key players involved into administering the overall situation:

  1. Department of Disaster Management
  2. Armed Forces Division
  3. NGO Affairs Bureau
  4. Ministry of Foreign Affairs
  5. Ministry of Defense
  6. Ministry of Home Affairs

Department of Disaster Management (DDM)

Department of Disaster Management (DDM) under the Ministry of Disaster Management and Relief was set up in November 2012 following enactment of the Disaster Management Act 2012. The Department has the mandate to implement the objectives of Disaster Management Act by reducing the overall vulnerability from different impacts of disaster by undertaking risk reduction activities ; conducting humanitarian assistance programs efficiently to enhance the capacity of poor and disadvantaged as well as strengthening and coordinating programs undertaken by various government and non-government organizations related to disaster risk reduction and emergency response. DDM is responsible to execute the directions, recommendations by the Government in connection with disaster management as well as the national disaster management principles and planning.

DDM headed by the Director General focuses on networking and collaborating with the various Ministries, Departments and Scientific, Technical, Research, Academic institutions, Development Partners, UN Agencies and non-government Organizations within and outside the Government working on various aspects of disaster risk reduction and response management. DDM conducts research, organizes workshops and training programs, publishes its reports and documents and provide various policy advisory services to the concerned Ministry of the Government of Bangladesh. DDM has the vision to be recognized as a vibrant Centre of Excellence for knowledge, research and capacity building on disaster management for the Disaster Management professionals across level.

Mission & Vision of DDM

The Vision, the Mission, the Function and the Modalities for setting up the Department of Disaster Management (DDM) were determined in the light of Disaster Management Act 2012 and in consultation with the Ministry of Disaster Management and Relief.

List of Officers- Department of Disaster Management

Name Designation Phone (Office) Email

Md Mohshin

Director General (Additional Secretary)

880-2-8835495

880-1711161926

dg@ddm.gov.bd

Md. Harun or Rahshid

Director (Training & Research)

880-2-9859637

880-1711966019

harun_171965@yahoo.com

Md. Abu Bakar Siddique

Director (Admin)

880-2-9892398

880-1711937880

talukderurmila@yahoo.com

Md. Abu Bakar Siddique

Director (FFW)

880-2-9861113

880-1715002101

bsiddique06@gmail.com

A.T. M Kamrul Islam Tang

Director (Plang. & Dev.)

880-2-9858755

880-1711982363

kamrulislamtang@gmail.com

Mohammad Golam Mostofa

Director (MIM)

880-2-9859636

880-1711319563

gmostofa11963@gmail.com

Md. Iftekharul Islam

Director (Relief)

880-2-9860386

880-1731461272

islameftekharul@yahoo.com

Md. Anisur Rahman

Director (Monitoring &Evaluation)

880-2-9860523

880-1711056098

rohmananisur@yahoo.com

Giasudding Ahmed

Director (VGD)

880-2-9860209

880-1715001357

dvgf@ddm.gov.bd

Netai Chandra Dey Sarker

Asst Director (GIS)

8802-9882367

01552331433

netai@gmail.com

Mohammad Hafizur Rahman

Office in Charge (Emergency Response Center) (Addl. Charge)

880-2-58811651

880-1515670067

hafiz.ddm@gmail.com

Kamrun Nahar

Project Implementation Officer

88-01728362227

kamrunddm@gmail.com


Armed Forces Division (AFD)

Armed Forces Division is an extension of Prime Minister’s office for promulgation of policies, issuing Government approvals for Armed Forces deployment and coordination between Services Headquarters. It is a principal government organ for the coordination of all operational matters as well as important administrative matters relating to the Armed Forces. It has the authority, direction and control over Services on operational and administrative matter under the direct supervision and guidance of the Prime Minister. As per Government notification, Principal Staff Officer (PSO) is entrusted to perform the duties of a full-fledged Secretary with full administrative and financial authority as that of a Secretary in any other Division / Ministry.

Armed Forces Division plays a vital role in disaster management as part of our overall national strategy to cope with disaster. We have a comprehensive set of standing orders for disaster management (SOD), delineating the role and responsibility of all concerned agencies in disaster management. The Food and Disaster Management Ministry is the prime Government organ on whose request, AFD works primarily in aid to the civil power to mitigate the crisis.

The prime role of AFD is to coordinate the employment of Armed Forces in disaster management and the overall relief operation. A monitoring cell is established to coordinate with all concerned ministries of the government, which includes MOFA, MOHA, Civil Aviation, MODMR, Ministry of Health and of course friendly Armed Forces.

Armed Forces provide following service to affected population:

  • Transportation of relief goods by Armed Forces assets (Helicopter and Fixed Wing Air Craft).
  • Transportation of relief goods in affected districts through road, river and air route using Army, Naval, Airforce and Civil assets.
  • Augment civil health care service by Armed Forces Medical Teams.
  • Clearing of roads and restoration of road communication.
  • Assist in restoration of telecommunication.

List of Officers-AFD

Name

Appt

Phone & e-mail

Lieutenant General Md Mahfuzur Rahman, OSP, rcds, ndc, afwc, psc, PhD

Principal Staff Officer to AFD

9834320

afdpso@gmail.com

 Brig Gen Md Nurul Anwar, hdmc, afwc, psc, G

Director General, Ops & Plan

983-4330 (Off)

01730332153 & 01769014330

dg_ops@afd.gov.bd

 Brig Gen Mashrur Hossain Bhuiyan, afwc, psc

Admin & Logistics Directorate

983-4380 (Off),

01729-227227, 01769014380

dg_admin@afd.gov.bd

 Air Cdre A S M Fakhrul Islam, GUP, ndc, afwc, psc

Director General- Trg

983-4360 (Off), 01769014360

dg_trg@afd.gov.bd

 Cdre Bashir Uddin Ahmed, (G), ndc, psc, BN

Director General, (Civil Military Relationship)

9834370

dg_cmr@afd.gov.bd

 Sqn Ldr Syed Abdullah Al Mamun, GD (P)

PS to PSO 

 9834322

ps2pso@afd.gov.bd

 

 NGO Affairs Bureau

The NGO Affairs Bureau has the following responsibilities:

  • Providing one stop service to NGOs in respect of registration & processing of project proposals.
  • Approval of NGO projects, fund releases, permission for appointment of foreign expatriate consultants and fixation of their tenure.
  • Examination and evaluation of reports/returns submitted by the NGOs.
  • Coordination, monitoring, evaluation and inspection of NGO activities.
  • Collection of fees/service charges levied by the government.
  • Inspection of field level NGO activities and examining their accounts.
  • Liaison with the donors and the NGOs.
  • Formulation of reports on NGO activities and take appropriate measures.
  • Enlistment of Chartered Accounting Firms for auditing of Accounts of the NGO.
  • Approval of proposals for one-time grants.
  • Other matters relating to NGO Affairs.


NGO Affairs Bureau

Prime Minister's Office

Plot-E-13/B, Agargaon

Sher-e-Bangla Nagar, Dhaka-1207

Telephone (PABX)

5 5001 407 -9 (Reception-0)

Fax

5500741 0-11

E-mail

naffairsb@yahoo. com/info@ngoab. gov.bd

Website

www.ngoab. gov.bd


List of Officers

Name & Designation

Telephone Numbers

e-mail Address

K. M. Abdus Salam

Director General

55007400 Ext: 111

(P.A.-112)

dg@ngoab.gov.bd

salam_5395@yahoo. com

Md. Shahadat Hossain Director (Reg. & Audit) Joint Secretary

55007397 (Direct) ext: 113

(PA: l14) , 01 5523 80993

dreg@ngoab.gov.bd

Dr. Md. Helal Uddin

Director (Project-1), (Addl Secy)

55007403 Ext: 115

0171 1-006004

dirl@ngoab.gov.bd

Gokul Krishna Ghosh

Director (Project-2), (Joint Secy)

5500'7404 Ext: 117

017 1 1 -398252

di12@ngoab.gov.bd

gokulghosh19@gmail.com

Md. Anwar Hossain

Deputy Director (General), (DS)

55007399 Ext: 568

017 12-261727

ddg@ngoab.gov.bd

Emergency Preparedness Scenario

Disaster Scenarios

The geographical location and topographical features of Bangladesh have exposed the country to almost all kinds of natural and human induced disasters. The monsoon weather brings in tornados and cyclones affecting the entire country with high tidal upsurges at the coastal belts during March-June and October-December and due to heavy rainfall in the country as well as in the northern Indian states of Assam and Maghalaya, floods occur almost every year affecting almost two thirds of the country during the months of July to October. Although significant earthquake- tremors or Tsunamis did not take place in Bangladesh since over 100 years, a considerable part of the country falls under ‘Earthquake zone’ and mild tremors continues to occur in the southern parts of the country without any significant casualties or life loss, so far, but the country remains at threat of moderate to major earthquakes along with disasters like Tsunami.

Major Hazards of Bangladesh

There are number of hazards and risks have so far been seen and experinced. Flood including Flash Flood, Cyclone & Tidal surge, Tornado, River erosion, Landslides, medium Earthquake, Drought, etc have already made the severly sufferer. But the most dangerous impact of a major Earthquake is expected anytime in Bangladesh. Though by now the country has faced different types of disasters and managed them. Bangladesh with its sincere organised efforts could overcome those situatuations including reducing the losses of lives and property. But it didn’t have any experience of managing high scale earthquake.

Bangladesh and the northeastern Indian states have long been seismically active regions of the world, and have experienced numerous large earthquakes during the past 200 years. Many of seismic-tectonic studies have been undertaken on the area comprising the Indo-Burman ranges and their western extension in the northern India. Major active fault zones of the country have been delineated through geological trenching methods.

Therefore it is very esssential to formulate planes/SODs, exercise them and be prepared to manage the situation so that the risk and losses are reduced. The govt alongwith UN/INGOs/NGOs are conducting various exercises Participated by Bangladesh Armed Forces to make the stakholders prepared and aware the general mass. Among them Disaster Response Exercise and Exchange (DREE) is one of the most talked about Exercise in the field of Earthquake preparedness in the South East Asia region.

Disaster Response Exercise and Exchange (DREE)

Disaster Response Exercise and Exchange (DREE) was conducted for the first time in 2010, with a focus on capability exchange and the Incident Command System (ICS). Since then every year this Exercise is coordinated by the Armed Forces Division, where different concerned Ministries, Govt Divisions and other agencies have been participating including foreign friendly Military forces. The DREE were built upon the best practices and technical capacity development of the previous years and enhanced interoperability and capacity with a Table-Top Exercise (TTX) and Field exercise in different areas. Through this exercise, following subject matters are being focused:

  • Evaluation of Public, private and military medical facilities.
  • Response on tactical earthquake.
  • Integration to command and control in the field,
  • Urban search & rescue techniques and practices,
  • Engineering assessment capacity and debris management.
  • Evaluation of communication, movement and distribution of critical supplies, engineering, health and prioritization on response efforts.
  • develop functional plan on different items like communication, medical, first responder’s approach etc
  • Use of a comprehensive database through the web for responding to any disaster

The DREEs always tried to emphasize on the planning, coordination and communication aspects, media, incorporation of foreign militaries, international humanitarian assistance, etc so that the best output is achieved for earthquake preparedness.

Objectives of DREE  

  • Test and enhance own ability of managing earthquake disaster at City Corporation Level through establishment of Disaster Incident Management Team (DIMT) focusing SAR, communication (DRECS), medical, shelter, relief, etc.
  • Enhance knowledge and practice of international tools and services for integration of international system into national system.
  • Train divisional level planners/disaster coordinators (military and civilian), so that they can arrange similar exercise/training at divisional/local level.

Humanitarian Community in Bangladesh

Humanitarian Coordination in Bangladesh

In 2012, a humanitarian coordination system in Bangladesh was established following a consultative process to review disaster preparedness and response arrangements. The review was jointly led by the Secretary of MoDMR Secretary and the UN RC under the auspices of the Local Consultative Group Disaster and Emergency Response (LCG DER) itself co-chaired by the UN and the MoDMR. This process resulted in the establishment of the Humanitarian Coordination Task Team (HCTT) under the LCG-DER and of nine humanitarian clusters and several working groups.

Since its inception the HCTT has played an important role in coordinating humanitarian action. It has overseen responses to a range of disaster events in Bangladesh. In addition to its coordination function the HCTT plays a vital role in formalizing and strengthening the relationship between the Government of Bangladesh and national and international humanitarian organizations. Today, the HCTT comprises an additional cluster, the GBV cluster established in 2016, 3 representatives of the national NGO coordination platform led by DDM, 3 representatives of international NGOs representing the INGO emergency sub- committee and two representatives of the donor community. Working groups are: Cash Working Group (CwG), Shongjog, NAWG. Discussions are on-going concerning the establishment of the ETC Cluster. Moreover, BDRCS is being consulted for leading a new IMWG. IFRC is the co-lead of the Shelter cluster.

Coordination in Bangladesh through the LCG Mechanism

The Local Consultative Group (LCG) comprises the Government of Bangladesh (GoB) and all bilateral and multilateral Development Partners (DPs). The LCG’s goal is to ensure effective and efficient use of external aid in line with the GoB’s national development plan. This involves policy dialogue at several levels, information sharing about operations, and harmonization and alignment in accordance with the Paris Principles and Accra Agenda for Action on aid effectiveness. Currently there are seventeen sectoral and thematic LCG Working Groups (WG), including one region specific WG, jointly chaired by relevant Government and DP counter-part. The LCG Disaster and Emergency Response WG, one of the seventeen WGs, was established in January 2001. This national forum brings together Government, NGOs, donors and UN Agencies concerned with improving the effectiveness and efficiency of emergency response.

Reinforced National Humanitarian Coordination Architecture

To reinforce national ownership and national direction to HCTT’s work, proposals were made in order to strengthen the humanitarian system, especially in preparation for a response to a large-scale disaster response such as an earthquake in an urban centre.

  1. Revise membership of the National Disaster Management Committee (NDMC)/Inter-Ministerial Disaster Management Committee (IMDMC) to include the UNRC and BDRCS’s chairman for supporting the overall guidance to the HCTT. That would foster strategy engagement at the highest level as the NDMC is chaired by the PMO and comprises key authorities (including MoFA).
  2. Integrate military-to-military and civil-military coordination mechanism in the overall architecture;
  3. Improve dialogue and coordination within the donor community;
  4. Strengthen key clusters and inter-cluster groups by promoting the recognition of their added-value by the GoB;
  5. Integrate in the coordination architecture key tools and services that might be requested by the national authorities in case of large-scale natural disasters (i.e. OSOCC, USAR, EMT);
  6. Adapt and decentralize the humanitarian coordination architecture that takes notably in consideration the specific context of intervention (e.g. CHT Districts).

The Humanitarian Coordination Task Team (HCTT) advocated for the inclusion of the cluster system and the HCTT platform in the current revision of the Standing Order on Disasters (SODs). In addition, the need was highlighted to organize high-level quarterly strategic meetings between NDMC members (that would include the UNRC) with a view to reinforcing humanitarian engagement in support of key national authorities3. The elements of the proposed structure are outlined below. The HCTT advocated for the strengthening of Humanitarian Civil-Military Coordination. The PMO has recently established a Consultative Group on Civil-Military Coordination to be led by MoDMR and AFD to facilitate interaction between humanitarian and military actors in disaster response, and to guide the development of policy and strategic advice.


For contact information for UN Agencies, INGOs and National NGOs, please see 4.2 Bangladesh Humanitarian Agency Contact List




1.2 Bangladesh Regulatory Departments

National Regulatory Departments/Bureaus

The government of Bangladesh has various means to ensure the standard of materials, food and services. Different departments and authorities have been entrusted to administer these issues so that the quality and standards of materials, commodities, structures, practices and operations and services are maintained. These departments ensure that through setting standards and implementing rules, regulations and policies from time to time, conforming to the national and international basis relating to these issues. They regulate their own departments being authorities under respective ministries of the government. Some of such important departments and authorities are mentioned below:


Ministry / Department / Address

Contact Names & Email

Telephone & Fax

Directorate General of Drug Administration

Ministry of Health & Family Welfare)

(Aushad Bhavan, Mohakhali, Dhaka-1212)

Title: Director General

E-mail : dgda.gov@gmail.com Web: www.ddabd.org

Tel : 8802 9880803, 9880864, 9880897, 9880924

Summary of Role and Services

Considering the global and local development in the sector over the last two decades, the Ministry of Health & Family Welfare updated the National Drug Policy (NDP) in 2005. Repeated assessments have been conducted to improve the capacity of the Directorate-General of Drug Administration (DGDA), to effectively function as National Regulatory Authority (NRA). Moreover, there is Ltd effort to promote rational use of allopathic and effective use of traditional medicines. There is no responsible official body for organizing a national program to promote rational use of drugs.

Currently there is no vaccine production in the private sector in Bangladesh; however, with GOB encouragement and with its own initiative, the private sector has already made substantial investment in developing vaccine production infrastructure.

The missing component that will ensure the production of WHO pre-qualified vaccines and to ensure the production of quality drugs in the country is to have the functional National Regulatory Authority (NRA) with support of National Control Laboratory (NCL) as per WHO recommended standards. Implementation of Institutional Development Plan for NRA and NCL are needed to be immediately taken up as per recommendation of WHO.


Ministry / Department / Address

Contact Names & Email

Telephone & Fax

National Board of Revenue 

Shegun Bagicha, Dhaka-1000.

Title: Chairman

Tel: 0088-02-9348344-08, 8318120-26(Ext.-200) 

Email: chairman@nbr.gov.bd

Private Secretary of The Chairman

Tel: 0088-02- 0392555 (Ext.-201)

Email: kamrul211973@yahoo.com

Income Tax Wing

Title: Member (Tax Admin and Human Resource Management) 

Tel: 48315876

Email: kalipadah@yahoo.com

Title: Member (Tax Appeal and Exemption) 

Tel: 02-8391166

Email: rawshonara123@gmail.com

Customs and VAT Wing

Title: Member (Customs and VAT Admin)

Tel: 02-8391328

Email: saifulcustoms@yahoo.com

Title: First Secretary (Customs & VAT Admin)

Tel: 02-8391570

Email: mizan15115@yahoo.com

Title: Member (Customs, Export, Bond & IT) 

Tel: 02-8391171

Email: sultaniqbal123@yahoo.com

Title: Member (VAT Implimentation & IT) 

Tel: 02-9352005

Email: jamal_rangon@yahoo.com

Summary of Role and Services

The National Board of Revenue (NBR) is the central authority for tax administration in Bangladesh. Administratively, it is under the Internal Resources Division (IRD) of the Ministry of Finance (MoF). MoF has 4 Divisions, namely, the Finance Division the Internal Resources Division (IRD), the Banking Division and the Economic Relations Division (ERD). Each division is headed by a Senior Secretary to the Government. Senior Secretary, IRD is the ex-officio Chairman of NBR. NBR is responsible for formulation and continuous re-appraisal of Revenue-policies and laws in Bangladesh.


Ministry / Department / Address

Contact Names & Email

Telephone & Fax

Bangladesh Atomic Energy Commission

Paramanu Bhaban

E-12/A, Agargaon, Sher-e-Bangla Nagar, Dhaka- 1207, Bangladesh

Title: Chairman

Email: chairman@baec.gov.bd

Web: www.baec.org.bd

Tel: 880-2-9032259 (Direct), 818 18 06 (PA)

Summary of Role and Services

Bangladesh Atomic Energy Commission (BAEC) was established in February 1973 through the promulgation of the Presidential Order 15 of 1973. Since then BAEC has been keeping itself engaged in the planning and development of acquiring nuclear technology for possible peaceful applications in the fields of Food, Agriculture, Health, Industry and Environment ensuring nuclear safety and radiation protection. Accordingly, BAEC has undertaken a good number of R&D programs in its various research establishments and developed indigenous expertise to achieve the cherished goal of self-reliance through national efforts and international cooperation

Radiation Testing & Monitoring Laboratory

Radioactivity Testing and Monitoring Laboratory was set up by the BAEC at Chattogram in 1987. Since then the laboratory has been continuing test of all imported and exportable food stuffs entering through Chattogram Port and giving clearance certificate on the basis of their acceptable radioactivity limits, workplace radiation monitoring, checking of scrap metals for radioactive contamination etc.

Ministry / Department / Address

Contact Names & Email

Telephone & Fax

Bangladesh Telecommunication Regulatory Commission (BTRC)

IEB Bhaban (5,6 & 7 floor)

Ramna, Dhaka-1000

Title: Chairman

Email: chairman@btrc.gov.bd

Web: http://www.btrc.gov.bd

Tel: + 880 29558855

Summary of Role and Services

Bangladesh Telecommunication Regulatory Commission (BTRC) is an independent Commission established under the Bangladesh Telecommunication Act, 2001 (Act no. 18 of 2001) published by the Parliament in the Bangladesh Gazette, extraordinary issue of April 16, 2001. BTRC started functioning from January 31, 2002.

Ministry / Department / Address

Contact Names & Email

Telephone & Fax

Bangladesh Standards & Testing Institution (BSTI)
Maan Bhaban 116/A, Tejgaon Industrial Area, Dhaka-1208

Title: Director General

Email: dg@bsti.gov.bd

Web: http://bsti.portal.gov.bd

Tel: 880 2 8870275

Summary of Role and Services

Bangladesh Standards and Testing Institution (BSTI), the only National Standards body of Bangladesh, is playing an important role in developing and Promoting industrial Standardization. Keeping in view that Standardization, metrology, testing and quality control in the industrial spheres are the basic pre-requisite of the infrastructure necessary for sound economic development of the country, the Government of Bangladesh has established the Bangladesh Standards and Testing Institution (BSTI) with the merger of Bangladesh Standards Institution and the Central Testing Laboratories in 1985 through promulgating "The Bangladesh Standards and Testing Institution Ordinance, 1985(Ordinance XXXVII of 1985)".

The BSTI is a body corporate and its administrative Ministry is the Ministry of Industries.

 The Institution so formed has become member of the International Organization for standardization (ISO) in 1974. At present, BSTI is the Member/Affiliate Member/ Contact Point/ Nodal Point of the following International/Regional Organizations:

  • International Organization for Legal Metrology (OIML)
  • Codex Alimentary Commission (CAC) of FAO/WHO
  • International Electro technical Commission (IEC)
  • Asia Pacific Metrology Program (APMP)
  • Asian Forum for Information Technology (AFIT)
  • ISO Information Network (ISO NET)
  • Standing Group for Standardization, Metrology, Testing and Quality

BSTI's task is to prepare Standards for all articles, products, methods and services. The Institution can bring any product under BSTI's Compulsory Certification marking after approval of the government. A regulation has already been notified by special Regulatory order named BSTI Regulation 1989 for this purpose. The BSTI marks cannot be used under any circumstances by others without approval in advance from BSTI. Only the standards approved and passed by the Institution are called Bangladesh Standards. As a rule, the Bangladesh Standards are voluntary. The compulsoriness of a standard requires of being as Bangladesh one. Compulsory standards are published in the Official Gazette. The authority to which the Institution reports is the Ministry of Industries.

Ministry / Department / Address

Contact Names & Email

Telephone

Civil Aviation Authority of Bangleadesh (CAAB)

Headquarter, Kurmitola,

Dhaka-1229, Bangladesh

Title: Chairman

Email: chairman@caab.gov.bd

Web: https://caab.portal.gov.bd/

Tel: 880 2 8901400

Cell: 01708167001

Summary of Role and Services

Civil Aviation Authority, Bangladesh (CAAB) functions as the regulatory body for all aviation related activities in Bangladesh. It is also the aeronautical service provider and is responsible for safe, expeditious and efficient flow of air traffic within the Flight Information Region (FIR) bounded by the International geographic boundary of Bangladesh. This organization is the custodian of all airfields and allied facilities including air navigation facilities.

Aviation activities in independent Bangladesh started in the last week of December 1971. Over the years the infrastructure and facilities were developed. At present, aviation activities are being carried out from 3 international and 5 domestic airports, about 17 air lines are now operating in and out of the country; about 43 States signed bilateral agreements with Bangladesh.


List of Ministries and Divisions

Sl

Ministry/Division

Address


1

Honorable President’s Office


Bangobhaban, Dhaka.

A

Public Division

B

Personal Division


2

Honorable Prime Minister’s Office

Old Parliament Bhaban, Tejgaon, Dhaka.

A

Armed Forces Division

Dhaka Cantonment, Dhaka

B

Cabinet Division

Building Number: 1, Bangladesh Secretariat, Dhaka

3

Ministry of Chattogram Hill Tracts Affairs

Building Number: 4, Bangladesh Secretariat, Dhaka.

4

Ministry of Primary and Mass Education

Building Number: 6, Bangladesh Secretariat, Dhaka

5

Ministry of Agriculture

Building Number: 4, Bangladesh Secretariat, Dhaka.

6

Ministry of Civil Aviation and Tourism

Building Number: 6, Bangladesh Secretariat, Dhaka.

7

Ministry of Commerce

Building Number: 3, Bangladesh Secretariat, Dhaka


8

Ministry of Road Transport and Bridges

Building Number: 7, Bangladesh Secretariat, Dhaka

A

Road Transport and Highways Division

Building Number: 7, Bangladesh Secretariat, Dhaka.

B

Bridges Division

Bridges Bhaban, New Airport Road, Banani, Dhaka.

9

Ministry of Cultural Affairs

Building Number: 6, Bangladesh Secretariat, Dhaka.

10

Ministry of Defence

Ganobhabon Complex, Shere Bangla Nagar, Dhaka

11

Ministry of Food

Building Number: 4, Bangladesh Secretariat, Dhaka.


12

Ministry of Education

Building Number: 6, Bangladesh Secretariat, Dhaka.

A

Secondary and Higher Education Div

Building Number: 6, Bangladesh Secretariat, Dhaka.

B

Technical and Madrasha Education Div

Building Number: 6, Bangladesh Secretariat, Dhaka.


13

Ministry of Power, Energy and Mineral Resources

Building Number: 6, Bangladesh Secretariat, Dhaka

A

Power Division

B

Energy and Mineral Resources Division

14

Ministry of Environment, Forest and Climate Change

Building Number: 6, Bangladesh Secretariat, Dhaka


15

Ministry of Public Administration

Building Number:1, Bangladesh Secretariat, Dhaka

A

Bangladesh Public Service Commission Secretariat

Old Air Port Building, Tejgaon, Dhaka.

16

Ministry of Fisheries and Livestock

Building Number: 6, Bangladesh Secretariat, Dhaka.



17

Ministry of Finance

Building Number: 7, Bangladesh Secretariat, Dhaka.

A

Finance Division

Building Number: 7, Bangladesh Secretariat, Dhaka.

B

Economic Relations Division

Block Number: 8, Shere Bangla Nagar, Dhaka-1207

C

Internal Resources Division

Building Number: 6, Bangladesh Secretariat, Dhaka.

D

Financial Institutions Division

Building Number: 7, Bangladesh Secretariat, Dhaka.

18

Ministry of Foreign Affairs

Segun Bagicha, Dhaka.


19

Ministry of Health and Family Welfare


Building Number: 3, Bangladesh Secretariat, Dhaka.


A

Health Services Division

B

Medical Education and Family Welfare Division


20

Ministry of Home Affairs


Building Number: 8, Bangladesh Secretariat, Dhaka.

A

Public Security Division

B

Security Services Division

21

Ministry of Housing and Public Works

Building Number: 5, Bangladesh Secretariat, Dhaka.

22

Ministry of Industries

91, Motijhel C/A, Dhaka.

23

Ministry of Information

Building Number: 4, Bangladesh Secretariat, Dhaka

24

Ministry of Textiles and Jute

Building Number: 6, Bangladesh Secretariat, Dhaka.

25

Ministry of Labour & Employment

Building Number: 7, Bangladesh Secretariat, Dhaka



26

Ministry of Law, Justice and Parliamentary Affairs

Building Number: 4, Bangladesh Secretariat, Dhaka.

A

Law and Justice Division

B

Legislative and Parliamentary Affairs Division

C

Bangladesh Parliament Secretariat

Shere Bangla Nagar, Dhaka-1207.

27

Ministry of Land

Building Number: 4, Bangladesh Secretariat, Dhaka.



28

Ministry of Local Government, Rural Development and Co-operatives



Building Number: 7, Bangladesh Secretariat, Dhaka.


A

Local Government Division

B

Rural Development and Co-operatives Division



29

Ministry of Planning

Planning Commission Campus, Sher-e- Bangla Nagor, Dhaka, Bangladesh

A

Planning Division

Block Number: 4, Shere Bangla Nagar, Dhaka-1207

B

Statistics and Informatics Division

Statistics Building, E-27/A, Agargaon, Dhaka.

C

Implementation Monitoring & Evaluation Division

Block Number: 12, Shere Bangla Nagar, Dhaka.


30

Ministry of Posts, Telecommunications and Information Technology

Building Number: 7, Bangladesh Secretariat, Dhaka.

A

Posts and Telecommunications Division

Building Number: 7, Bangladesh Secretariat, Dhaka

B

Information & Communication Technology Division

Bangladesh Computer Council (BCC), Bhaban [Level-5], Agargaon, Sher-e-Bangla Nagar, Dhaka-1207

31

Ministry of Religious Affairs

Building Number: 8, Bangladesh Secretariat, Dhaka

32

Ministry of Shipping

Building Number: 6, Bangladesh Secretariat, Dhaka.

33

Ministry of Social Welfare

Building Number: 6, Bangladesh Secretariat, Dhaka.

34

Ministry of Women and Children Affairs

Building Number: 6, Bangladesh Secretariat, Dhaka

35

Ministry of Water Resources

Building Number: 7, Bangladesh Secretariat, Dhaka

36

Ministry of Youth and Sports

Building Number: 7, Bangladesh Secretariat, Dhaka.

37

Ministry of Liberation War Affairs

Govt. Transport Pool Bhaban, Bd. Secretariat Link Road, Dhaka.

38

Ministry of Expatriates’ Welfare and Overseas Employment

71-72, Old Elephant Road, Escarton Garden, Probashi Kalyan Bhaban, Dhaka

39

Ministry of Railways

Rail Bhaban, 16 Abdul Gani Road, Dhaka.

40

Ministry of Science and Technology             

Building Number: 6, Bangladesh Secretariat, Dhaka.

41

Ministry of Disaster Management and Relief

Building Number: 4, Bangladesh Secretariat, Dhaka.


Details of Different Ministries

Full details along with contact list and other details of Ministers and Other Officers are shown at Art numbers 4.1.1 to 4.1.20.



1.3 Bangladesh Customs Information

Duties and Tax Exemption

For contact information regarding government custom authorities, please follow the link below: 

4.2.1 Bangladesh Government Contact List

Emergency Response

[Note: This section contains information which is related and applicable to ‘crisis’ times. These instruments can be applied when an emergency is officially declared by the Government.  When this occurs, there is usually a streamlined process to import goods duty and tax free.]

Agreements / Conventions Description

Ratified by Country?

(Yes / No)

WCO (World Customs Organization) member

Yes - 1st Jan 1985

Annex J-5 Revised Kyoto Convention

n/a

OCHA Model Agreement

n/a

Tampere Convention (on the Provision of Telecommunication Resources for Disaster Mitigation and Relief Operations)

n/a

Regional Agreements (on emergency/disaster response, but also customs unions, regional integration)

Special custom regulation of procedure for Humanitarian Emergency has not yet been established by the Bangladesh Government. However in humanitarian emergency situations it is possible to use the UN and Disaster Management Bureau or Logistic Cluster as facilitator for help with the custom authority.


Exemption Regular Regime (Non-Emergency Response)

[Note: This section should contain information on the usual duties & taxes exemption regime during non-emergency times, when there is no declared state of emergency and no streamlines process (e.g. regular importations/development/etc.).]

Organizational Requirements to obtain Duty Free Status

United Nations Agencies

United Nations, UN bodies and UN specialized agencies are exempted from payment of the local duties and taxes for the goods imported for their official use only. In this regard National Board of Revenue issued a letter reference No. 3(84)NBR(Cus)II/74/1766-70 Dated, Dhaka the 28th Jan 1975.

Non Governmental Organizations

Unless properly registered at the NGOAB and agreement for import of relief items free of duty, INGO’s are not entitled to get duty free status. Any exception depends on the contract with the Government of Bangladesh.

Exemption Certificate Application Procedure

Duties and Taxes Exemption Application Procedure

Generalities (include a list of necessary documentation)

Official and regular procedure of duties exception doesn’t exist in Bangladesh for emergency and relief purpose. Each organization involved in humanitarian and Relief issue in Bangladesh has to contact the NGO Bureau Affairs (for NGOs) or the Ministry of Disaster Management and Relief (MoDMR) for UN agencies and the National Board of Revenue in order to negotiate a customs agreement related to their own activities.

An official duty exemption agreement exists for the UN agencies and their implementing partners. Therefore UN has to provide a copy of this agreement and the implementing partner a copy of the MoU. For the International NGOs, the NGO Bureau Affairs is in charge of following up the process of exemption of taxes and duty.

Process to be followed (step by step or flowchart)

  1. A request letter for a Customs Duty and Sales Tax (CDST) exemption certificate has to be submitted (case by case, along with photocopies of all shipping documents) to the Ministry of Disaster Management and Relief (required papers-photocopies of Bill of lading [non-negotiable cargo receipt], Invoice, Certificate of Origin, Radiation Certificate from load port, Health Certificate from load port, Certificate of Weight and Quality Condition, Packing list/container list, Fumigation Certificate, Phytosanitary Certificate, Cargo Manifesto, Stowage Plan, Fit for Human Consumption Certificate from load port, and operational document with clauses(Contracted). After obtaining a CDST exemption certificate, the 2nd step starts.
  2. The concerned clearing agent should prepare a bill of entry (Required IGM-Import General Manifesto) and submit it to Customs for a Customs Realize Order, along with all certificates (NOC) from local authorities and all original shipping documents - CDST exemption certificate, Plant Quarantine Certificate from the Department of Agriculture, Radiation Certificate from Atomic Energy Commission, Bill of Lading (non-negotiable cargo receipt), Invoice, Certificate of origin, Radiation Certificate from load port, Health Certificate from load port, Certificate of Weight and Quality Condition, Packing list/container list, Fumigation Certificate, Phytosanitary Certificate, Cargo Manifesto, Stowage Plane, Fit for Human Consumption Certificate from load port. After obtaining the Realize Order with an approved bill of entry and an assessment notice from Customs and they have returned all original shipping documents, the 3rd step will start.
  3. The concerned clearing agent should prepare a request letter for a DO (Delivery Order) and submit it to the concerned shipping agent, along with all certificates (NOC) from the local authorities and all original shipping documents - Realize Order, approved bill of entry and assessment notice from Customs, Original Bill of Lading (non-negotiable cargo receipt) and Invoice (if required). After obtaining the DO from the concerned shipping agent, the 4th step will start.
  4. The concerned clearing agent prepares a request letter for the CPA charge (River Dues, S. Rent, Weighment Charge, Repairing Charge, Lift on Charge, Vat- 15% MLWF Charge, etc.) and submits it to the concerned section of the Terminal Manager of CPA, along with all certificates (NOC) from the local customs authorities and a photocopy of all shipping documents - Realize Order, approved bill of entry and assessment notice from Customs, Photocopy of Bill of Lading (non-negotiable cargo receipt), filled up Jetty Challan and Realize Order from CPA. After payment to the CPA the 5th step will start.
  5. The concerned clearing agent prepares an intent letter for the discharge of the cargo/container placement and submits it to the concerned section of the Terminal Manager of CPA, along with certificates (NOC) from local customs authority, CPA payment and photocopy of shipping documents - Realize Order, approved bill of entry and assessment notice from Customs, photocopy of Bill of Lading (non-negotiable cargo receipt), Payment Jetty Challan & Realize Order from CPA, container list and photocopy of Jetty Sarker License. After receiving the Realize Order from the CPA for the discharge of the cargo/container replacement, the final stage will start.
  6. Upon completion of unloading all the cargo, it will transport to and stored in designated warehouses.

 Additional general import information is as follows:

 Air custom clearance: customs clearance of shipments arriving by air is undertaken by registered clearing agents.

Sea custom clearance: clearances of consignments that are arriving via sea are undertaken on the basis of the category of shipments. An RFQ to be sent to all registered/enlisted clearing and forwarding agents/transporters when shipments have to be cleared, as well as transported to final destination.

Exemption Certificate Document Requirements

Duties and Taxes Exemption Certificate Document Requirements (by commodity)

 

Food

NFI (Shelter, WASH, Education)

Medicines

Vehicle & Spare Parts

Staff & Office Supplies

Telecoms Equipment

Invoice

Yes, Original,1 copy, (applies to UN and NGOs)

Yes, Original,1 copy, (applies to UN and NGOs)

Yes, Original,1 copy, (applies to UN and NGOs)

Yes, Original,1 copy, (applies to UN and NGOs)

Yes, Original,1 copy, (applies to UN and NGOs)

Yes, Original,1 copy, (applies to UN and NGOs)

AWB/BL/Other Transport Documents

Yes, Original,1 copy, (applies to UN and NGOs)

Yes, Original,1 copy, (applies to UN and NGOs)

Yes, Original,1 copy, (applies to UN and NGOs)

Yes, Original,1 copy, (applies to UN and NGOs)

Yes, Original,1 copy, (applies to UN and NGOs)

Yes, Original,1 copy, (applies to UN and NGOs)

Donation/Non-Commercial Certificates

Yes, Original,1 copy, (applies to UN and NGOs)

Yes, Original,1 copy, (applies to UN and NGOs)

Yes, Original,1 copy, (applies to UN and NGOs)

Yes, Original,1 copy, (applies to UN and NGOs)

Yes, Original,1 copy, (applies to UN and NGOs)

Yes, Original,1 copy, (applies to UN and NGOs)

Packing Lists

Yes, Original,1 copy, (applies to UN and NGOs)

Yes, Original,1 copy, (applies to UN and NGOs)

Yes, Original,1 copy, (applies to UN and NGOs)

Yes, Original,1 copy, (applies to UN and NGOs)

Yes, Original,1 copy, (applies to UN and NGOs)

Yes, Original,1 copy, (applies to UN and NGOs)

Other Documents

Health & Radioactivity Certificates

N/A

No Objection Certificate*

MoFA Permission

N/A

No Objection Certificate

Additional Notes

  • The Health Certificate should certify as ‘fit for human consumption’ this can be obtained from either the country of origin or the Bangladesh Ministry of Health.
  • A Radioactivity Certificate is mandatory for food imports for human consumption such as milk, milk products, edible oil and other food items produced in any country. The radioactivity test report from the authority of the exporting countries must indicate levels of CS 137.
  • No Objection Certificates (NoC)
    • As per the Drug Act and Drug Ordinance of Bangladesh, any importation of medical goods including medicines, whether for relief or commercial use, must obtain ‘No Objection Certificate (NoC)’ from the Directorate General of Drug Administration (DGDA).
    • Telecommunication equipment also requires an NOC from the Bangladesh Telecommunication Regulatory Commission (BTRC).
  • Vehicles require permission from the Ministry of Foreign Affairs (MOFA) – if they are tax exempt and for official use. The format of this permission is not specified/consistent; it maybe a NoC, or it may require an import permit from Office of Chief Controller of Imports and Exports (CCI&E) or other form of permission. To import temporary vehicles or material for relief purpose a Certificate of Declaration, which should describe the precise use and the planning, has to be done by the agency to the customs Office.


Customs Clearance

General Information 

According to the National Agreement, import licenses are required for any imports for humanitarian agencies which are part of the UN Body. NGO’s have to declare through the NGO BO and to the Custom House the list of relief and emergency material required for implementing their projects and request an Import Certificate related to the action. 

Customs Information
Document Requirements
  • Medicine requires a No Objection Certificate (NOC) from Drug Administration.
  • Import of Pharmaceutical raw materials and packing materials is subject to approval by the Director of Drugs Administration, Government of Bangladesh. For import of food items, animal, poultry feed special documents are required.
  • Food, perishable and non-perishable, requires a Radiation Certificate from the Bangladesh Atomic Energy Commission (BAEC) to be submitted by consignee to Customs for clearance
  • Wireless telephones (electronic and remote control) require a Certificate from the Bangladesh Telecommunication Regulatory Commission (BTRC).
  • Quarantine restrictions apply in case of import of live animal, plants and plant products. Permissible live animals are importable only with clearance from the Directorate of Livestock Services. Permissible explosive items are importable with prior clearance from the Chief Inspector of Explosives.
  • Sanitary certificate is required for all livestock and plants and plant products (except fruit and vegetable) certifying that they are free of injurious insects, pests and diseases. 
  • Radiation certificate: imports of milk and milk products, edible oils, and certain other food items, including food for poultry and animals, may require radioactivity test reports issued by the competent authority in the country of Export.
  • Fumigation certificate: a fumigation certificate must accompany used clothing.
  • Straw and hay: Straw or hay used in packing must be certified to be free of insects and disease. 
  • Iron and steel: Imports of iron and steel require a producer’s certificate.
  • Textiles: law for textile imports requires a certificate of cleanliness.
  • Printed advertising matters such as posters, pamphlets, trade catalogues, and advertising circulars are admitted duty-free.
Embargoes
  • Bangladesh observes a boycott of Israel; no vessel or aircraft used for shipments to Bangladesh may call on any port in Israel. Goods may not ship on Israeli flag vessels.
  • Imports from Israel, as well as Serbia and Montenegro, are prohibited.
Prohibited Items

Usually food and medicine are accepted as humanitarian cargo in times of need.

Items not allowed cannot be specified in advance but, generally speaking, the following are prohibited: pornography, weapons, arms, dangerous goods, gambling devices, cash, jewelry, perishables, live pigs, pig and poultry fat, eggs (except hatching eggs), poppy seeds and dried posto dana, grass, opium, tendu leaves, lard, lard and tallow oil, solid or semi-solid palm oil, raw sugar, un-denatured ethyl alcohol (80% or higher) and other spirits denatured of any strength, wine, artificial mustard oil, selected petroleum products, woven fabrics of silk or silk waste, pig hair, some kinds of cloth, selected insecticides, nylon and polyethylene ropes, fishing nets (gillnets), used or new rags, vessels more than 15 years old, motorbikes more than three years old, and single phase electricity meters.

It is advised to check with Bangladesh Customs before initiating the procedure.

General Restrictions

Genetically Modified Food grains (GMO) are banned for import as per decision of Ministry of Agriculture. This is stipulated in the Import Permit which is issued by the Ministry of Agriculture. Certain items are banned for import by Commerce Ministry. If items on the banned list need to be imported, then a special sanction for import has to be obtained from Commerce Ministry.

Other restricted articles are: reconditioned office equipment (i.e. photocopier, typewriter, telex, computer, phone, fax machine); printed material, posters, video tapes, etc. containing matters likely to outrage the religious feelings and beliefs of any class of the citizens of Bangladesh; unless otherwise specified, old, second-hand and reconditioned goods; unless otherwise specified, all kinds of waste; and goods bearing pictures or writing which is obscene or of a religious connotation which may injure the religious feelings of any class of Bangladesh citizens.


Customs Clearance Document Requirements

Customs Clearance Document Requirements (by commodity)

 

Food

NFI (Shelter, WASH, Education)

Medicines

Vehicles & Spare Parts

Staff & Office Supplies

Telecoms Equipment

D&T Exemption Certificate

Certificate is required for tax exemptions

Certificate is required for tax exemptions

Certificate is required for tax exemptions

Certificate is required for tax exemptions

Certificate is required for tax exemptions

Certificate is required for tax exemptions

Invoice

Yes, Original,1 copy, (applies to UN and NGOs)

Yes, Original,1 copy, (applies to UN and NGOs)

Yes, Original,1 copy, (applies to UN and NGOs)

Yes, Original,1 copy, (applies to UN and NGOs)

Yes, Original,1 copy, (applies to UN and NGOs)

Yes, Original,1 copy, (applies to UN and NGOs)

AWB/BL/Other Transport Documents

Yes, Original,1 copy, (applies to UN and NGOs)

Yes, Original,1 copy, (applies to UN and NGOs)

Yes, Original,1 copy, (applies to UN and NGOs)

Yes, Original,1 copy, (applies to UN and NGOs)

Yes, Original,1 copy, (applies to UN and NGOs)

Yes, Original,1 copy, (applies to UN and NGOs)

Donation/Non-Commercial Certificates

Yes, Original,1 copy, (applies to UN and NGOs)

Yes, Original,1 copy, (applies to UN and NGOs)

Yes, Original,1 copy, (applies to UN and NGOs)

Yes, Original,1 copy, (applies to UN and NGOs)

Yes, Original,1 copy, (applies to UN and NGOs)

Yes, Original,1 copy, (applies to UN and NGOs)

Packing Lists

Yes, Original,1 copy, (applies to UN and NGOs)

Yes, Original,1 copy, (applies to UN and NGOs)

Yes, Original,1 copy, (applies to UN and NGOs)

Yes, Original,1 copy, (applies to UN and NGOs)

Yes, Original,1 copy, (applies to UN and NGOs)

Yes, Original,1 copy, (applies to UN and NGOs)

Phytosanitary Certificate

For Seeds, plant products & livestock

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

Other Documents

Health & Radioactivity Certificates

NA

No Objection Certificate

MoFA Permission

NA

No Objection Certificate

Additional Notes

Vehicles and temporary materiel

To import temporary vehicles or material for relief purpose a Certificate of Declaration, which should describe the precise use and the planning, has to be done by the agency to the Customs Office.

Telecommunication Materiel

To import telecommunication equipment (HF, VHF, Satellite) a certificate has to be provided by the Bangladesh Telecommunication Regulatory Commission (BTRC). In emergency situations the Disaster Management Bureau can facilitate this procedure.

Radioactivity test certificate

A test of radioactivity levels is mandatory for food imports for human consumption such as milk, milk products, edible oil and other food items produced in any country. The radioactivity test report from the authority of the exporting countries must indicate the level of CS 137 in each kilogram of food items shipped. Another certificate is required to state that such items are fit for human consumption. Food samples will be tested by the Bangladesh Atomic Energy Commission upon the arrival of such foods at a Bangladesh port.

A test of radioactivity levels is not required for food imported by hotels of international standard and diplomatic bonded warehouses. However, in such cases, a certificate from any internationally recognized testing agency or from the authority of the country where the food was produced is required and must be submitted together with the bill of lading. A test of radioactivity levels is not required for palm olein and RBD palm stearin produced in Malaysia or to be imported from Malaysia or Singapore. However, a test of purity of such imported items, carried out by the Bangladesh Council of Scientific and Industrial Research, is obligatory.

A radioactivity test is not necessary for imports of medicines.

The radioactivity test procedure can be relaxed in cases of imported rice and foodstuff from SAARC and South East Asian countries provided that such imports are accompanied by a certificate of origin as well as by a certificate stating that such foodstuff or rice is fit for human consumption. Perishable foodstuff imported from SAARC countries requires a radioactivity certificate from the authority of the exporting countries. The import of poultry feed and animal feed also requires radioactivity test reports, at CS 137 per kilogram, and a certificate stating that such items are fit for consumption by poultry or animals.

Sanitary and phytosanitary certificate

A sanitary certificate is required for all livestock and plants and most plant products, certifying that these items are free of insects, pests and diseases. An additional certificate is required for leaf tobacco attesting that the tobacco is free from Ephestia elutella or that this pest does not exist in the country of origin.

Other certificates

A fumigation certificate is mandatory for imports of used clothing. Straw and hay used in packing must be certified to be free from insects and diseases. A certificate of cleanliness is required by law for the import of textiles and a special certificate is required for the import of drugs and pharmaceutical products.

Documents

UN Agencies

NGO’s

Body concerned

Bill of entry

Yes

Yes

Custom Borders

Import Permit

No

Yes

NGO Bureau Affairs, Disaster Management Bureau, Custom House

Letter of Authorization

Yes

Donation Certificate

Suppliers and Agencies

Exemption certificate

UN and National Agreement

Special Agreement

NGO Bureau Affairs, Disaster Management Bureau, Custom House

Original Bill Of Lading duly endorsed

Yes

Yes

Transporter

Original Invoice

Yes

Yes

Supplier

Original Packing List

Yes

Yes

Supplier

Transit Regime

There are no transit land to land facilities in Bangladesh.


2 Bangladesh Logistics Infrastructure

Bangladesh Logistics Infrastructure 

The following sections contain information regarding the logistics infrastructure of Bangladesh.

Bangladesh Logistics Planning


2.1 Bangladesh Port Assessment

 

Bangladesh Ports


As a country situated by the sea Bangladesh has a large coastline of 580 km spread across the southern part of the country where it is joined with the Bay of Bengal. The ports situated by the sea have given Bangladesh opening for business, economic growth and a connection with the rest of the world. Although still being a developing country, like most of the developed countries majority of the economy in Bangladesh depends on these seaports, as 90% of the export and import both are conducted through these ports. There are 3 seaports in Bangladesh at present. The largest one Chattogram and second largest Mongla are in full operation. The third in size and capacity Payra port is partially in use. A fourth one named Matarbari seaport is on its way to be opened and become fully functional very soon. It is that to keep a smooth flow of commercial transactions proper development, managing and directing these seaports with utmost efficiency is essential. For this reason, these seaports are directed under Ministry of Shipping in Bangladesh.


For information on Bangladesh Port Network contact details, please see the following link: 

A detailed list of the transit times of ocean freight from other ports to the port of Chittagong can be found here:


2.1.1 Bangladesh Port of Chittagong

Key port information can also be found at: Maritime Database information on Bangladesh

Port Overview

Port Location and Contacts

Country

Bangladesh

Province or District

Chittagong

Town or City (Closest location) with Distance (km)

Name: Chittagong

km: n/a

Port's Complete Name

Port of Chittagong 

Latitude

22.21667

Longitude

91.8

Managing Company or Port Authority (If more than one operator, break down by area of operation)

Chittagong Port Authority (CPA)

Management Contact Person

Md. Omar Faruk  +880-31-2510869

secretary@cpa.gov.bd

Closest Airport and Frequent Airlines to / from International Destinations

Airport Name:

Shah Amanat International Airport

Airlines: BIMAN, NovoAir, Regent Airways, US-Bangla Airways

Port Picture


The Port of Chattogram is the principal port of Bangladesh. The port was established at its present location in 1887. By 1910, four jetties were constructed to handle 0.5 million MT of cargo annually. Since then the port has grown gradually to the present shape.

It is situated on the right bank of the river Karnafuli at a distance of about 9 nautical miles from the shoreline of the Bay of Bengal. Chattogram Port is considered the heart of the economy of Bangladesh. The geographic location of this port creates the opportunity for easy and cost-effective foreign trade to be carried out through with all South Asian countries as well as other Asian countries. Enough and low-cost labour is also readily available here. For these reasons, Chattogram Port holds much potential as a highly promising regional seaport. Consequently, cargo handling through Chattogram Port has not only rapidly increased but cargo type has also diversified. The Port is a regular member of Japan based International Ports and Harbours (IAPH).As a gateway of Bangladesh, Chattogram Port not only handles 92% of the country’s international trade but also generates about 35% annual revenue of the country on account of import tax, duties and VAT which confirms the significance of the port in the Government’s finance. About 80% export-import industries and 5-Export Processing Zone (out of 10 EPZ) are situated within Dhaka and Chattogram division and Dhaka- Chattogram corridor (transportation by rail, road & river) due to the Chattogram Port. This also helps to generate about 30% of the GDP. 100% imported Petroleum Oil and Lubricant (POL) of the country is transported through this port. Not only that, through this port 100% finished product are exported and 80% raw materials & accessories are imported. For Ready Made Garments (RMG) sector, which fetches about 76% of the country’s export earnings as hard currency.

Port website: http://cpa.gov.bd/ 

Key port information may also be found at: http://www.maritime-database.com

It is situated on the right bank of the river Karnafuli at a distance of about 9 nautical miles from the shoreline of the Bay of Bengal. River Karnafuli rising in the Lushai Hill falls in the Bay of Bengal after taking a winding course of 120 nautical miles through the districts of Chattogram Hill Tracts and Chattogram. Upper limits of the river water are formed by two straight lines, one drawn across the Karnafuli River in the North by joining 2 pillars located at Lat: 22024’33″N-Long: 91054’30E and Lat: 22024’56″N- Long: 91054’11″E and the other by joining the 2 pillars located at Lat: 22025’07″N- Long: 91053’18″E and Lat: 22025’07″N- Long: 91053’10″E. These limits include so much of the sea and of the River Karnafuli and the River Halda and the area that lie within 137.162 Metre, of high water mark at ordinary spring tide and the docks, wharves, quays, stages, jetties, piers, warehouse, sheds, railway line and yards within the limits of the bounded area and such other area outside it as included in the Schedule iii of the Chattogram Port Act. The seaward approach to the Port of Chattogram may considered to be northwards of the 10-fathom contour in latitude 22024′ North and longitude 9103″ East: The distance to the pilot ground from the south patches shoal being 46 nautical miles on the direct course.

Port Performance

Chattogram Port is the core hub of export and import of the country. The port has been performing better and better each year despite lots of limitations. It is now competing with the world rated ports in terms of all matrix. This port is now ranked at 64 in the Lloyd’s list of 100 container ports in the world, which was 70th, 71st, 76th and 87th in last 4 years.

Vessels of draught ranges from 8.50 m. to 9.20 m

Maximum permissible LOA of a vessel is 190 meters

Seasonal Constraints


Occurs

Time Frame

Rainy Season

Yes

The weather in Bangladesh is largely governed by the monsoon. The prevailing wind directions are from South to South East during the months of April through September. After taking easterly direction for a while the wind turns to the northerly and north-easterly directions, the later prevail from November to January. During the months of February and March, winds turn via westerly direction back to the Southerly to South Easterly. In excess of 20 Knots/ Beaufort wind scale 5 prevails for 6 percent to time while those in excess of 30 Knots/Beaufort wind scale 7 persists for about 0.1 percent of the time during cyclones i.e. During the transition between monsoon and dry seasons in May, October, and November. The area of Payra port experienced four severe Cyclonic water surges during the last 44 years. In 1960 & 1963 speeds recorded were 125 Knots Max. In 1970 and 1991 speeds were recorded 138 Knots max. and 180 Knots max. respectively.

Financial Year

No. of Vessels

2012-2013

2,136

2013-2014

2,294

2014-2015

2,566

2015-2016

2,875

2016-2017

3,092

2017-2018

3,664

2018-2019

1,882 (till Dec 2018)

Financial Year

Import (Tons)

Export (Tons)

Inland (Tons)

ICD (Tons)

Grand Total (Tons)

Growth (%)

2012-2013

38,312,028

5,059,640

6,087,947

457,559

49,917,174

3.95

2013-2014

41,960,170

5,338,377

5,833,786

445,218

53,577,551

7.33

2014-2015

48,941,406

5,839,986

6,469,673

474,800

61,725,865

15.21

2015-2016

58,324,786

5,971,634

6,366,607

493,360

71,156,387

15.28

2016-2017

66,464,285

6,709,759

6,330,639

477,836

79,982,519

12.40

2017-2018

78,050,447

6,997,465

7,429,082

446,234

92,923,228

16.18

2018-2019

82,939,731

6,846,406

7,761,749

515,245

98,240,655

5.72


Container Handling Statistics of CPA

Financial Year

Import

Export

Total

TEUs

MT

TEUs

MT

TEUs

MT

2013-14

812,918

11,125,348

812,591

5,012,427

1,625,509

16,137,775

2014-15

940,827

13,132,923

926,115

5,535,446

1,867,062

18,668,369

2015-16

1,109,355

15,498,565

1,080,084

5,642,419

2,189,439

21,140,984

2016-17

1,211,874

17,084,610

1,207,607

6,395,923

2,419,481

23,480,533

2017-18

1,363,375

19,089,447

1,342,534

6,880,740

2,705,909

25,970,187

2018-19

(Jul-Dec 18)

719,433

96,74,719

725,911

33,82,752

14,45,344

13,057,471

Discharge Rates and Terminal Handling Charges

Vessels chargeable

Rate of port dues

Sea-going vessels

USD 0.241  per GRT

Sea-going vessel engaged in lightering within port limits

USD 0.150 per GRT

Sea-going vessels not engaged in lightering have not left the port after 30 days from the date of entry

USD 0.050

Sea-going vessel entering for taking fuel, stores and water, etc

USD 0.08


Vessels working within port limits, excluding sea-going lighters

Not exceeding 10 GRT: 25 BDT per vessel

Between 10 – 100 GRT: 200 BDT

Between 100 - 200 GRT: 500 BDT

Exceeding 200 GRT: 3 BDT per GRT

Barge/flat: 1.5 BDT per GRT

Country boat/Shampan: 0.25 per GRT.


Other Charges

Berth occupancy charges

Per GRT per day

USD 0.03

Mooring occupancy charge

At Own anchor

Per GRT per day

USD 0.02

At mooring

Per GRT per day

USD 0.015


Sea-going ships

200 to 1,000 GRT

Per Tug per Movement

USD 82.50

Over 1,000 to 5,000 GRT

Do

USD 277.50

Over 5,000 GRT

Do

USD 594



Water supply charge

At Roosevelt jetty

Per 1000 liters

30BDT

At Mongla (local)

At Mongla (to Ships)

Per 1000 liters

Per 1000 liters

60 BDT

USD 10

At Hiron pont (local)

Per 1000 liters

700BDT

At Hiron pint (to ship)

Per 1000 liters

USD 20


Jetty Crane Charge


Use of Jetty crane

Per crane per period of 8 hours

USD 45

Use of British crane

Do

USD 33.75

Non-Use of Jetty Crane

If cancelled within less than 6 hours of booked period

Do

USD 40

If cancelled previous to 6 hours of booked period

Do

USD 20

Holliday charge (working on jetty)

Per ship per holiday

USD 60

Night charge (working on jetty)

Per ship per night

USD 30

Security guard engaged on the sea-going vessel

Per person, per 4 hours

BDT 150

 

Shifting / Detention Fees

Services

Basis of  Charge

Rate

Fees for shifting vessels from one berth or mooring or swinging her to another

Per movement

USD 29.80

Fees for such shifting taking place in whole or part between 6:00 pm to 6:00 am

Per movement

USD 59.60

Detention fees for failure of a vessel in arriving or sailing from the port in  time

Per day

USD 100

Pilot detention fee

Per day

USD 20

Berthing or unberthing at the time of arrival or sailing of the vessels

Each occasion

USD 88.50

Same at the time of shifting

Each occasion

USD 44.25

 

Port & Harbour Dues

Services

Basis of Charge

Rate

River dues

Domestic cargo

Per 1000 kg

33BDT

Import cargo

Do

BDT 15.30




Landing charge / Handling charge

Bagged cargo (wheat and rice)

Per 1000kg

BDT. 40

Other bagged cargo (cement, iron, steel, salt, sugar etc)

Do

BDT. 32

All other imports not exceeding 3MT

Do

BDT. 90

Wheeled or tracked equip.

Do

BDT 175

Garments, cloths, cotton, etc

Do

BDT. 16

Crude refined oil, palm oil, soyabean oil etc

Do

BDT. 50

Other import more than 20 MT

Do

BDT. 250

Weight bridge charge

Per 1000 Kg

2.5BDT

Trans-shipment charge at the same wharf

Per 1000 Kg

150% of landing charge

Terminal charge on river traffic

Per 1000 Kg

21.70BDT


Container Handling Charges

Services

 Time

Basis of charge

Up to 20’ Container

Above 20’ container

Loading / Discharging


FCL Container

-

Per container

USD 43.40

USD 65.10

LCL Container

-

Do

USD 130.00

USD 195.00

Empty Container

-

Do

USD 22.10

USD 33.20

Container storage

Loaded Container

1-4 days  free

Per container

-

-

1st 7 days after free time

Do

USD 6.00

USD 12.00

8th -20th days

Do

USD 12

USD 24

Thereafter up to delivery

Do

USD 240

USD 48

Empty Container

1-7 daus days

Per container

USD 6.00

USD 12.00

8-20 days

Do

USD 1200

USD 24.00

21 days onwards/per day

Do

USD 24.00

USD 48.00


Reefer Container Service

Particulars of Charges Basis of Charge Rates
Supply of electricity and connecting and disconnecting reefers, including monitoring

Per container, per diem or part thereof

USD  9.00

Change of status

Per container per change

USD  10.00


River Dues (Containerized)

Particulars of Charges

Basis of Charges

Rates (Not Exceeding 21 ft.)

Rates (Exceeding 21 ft.)

FCL container and Contents

Import

Per container

BDT. 408.00

BDT. 816.00

Export

Do

BDT. 184.00

BDT. 368.00

LCL container and Contents

Import

Per 1000 kg. or part thereof

BDT. 34.10

-

Export

Do

BDT. 15.30

-


Lift on / Lift off Charges

Lift on / lift off charge, Loaded container

per container

BDT. 1000.00

BDT. 1500.00

Lift on / lift off charge, empty container

-do-

BDT. 375.00

BDT. 562.50


Shore handling containerised cargo

Particulars of Charges Basis of Charges Rates
Stuffing / un-stuffing Per 1000 kg. or part thereof of contents BDT. 300.00


Berthing Specifications

Specifications NB Bulk Min Bulk Max Conventional Min Conventional Max
Berths

31

2.2 m

186 m

2.2 m

190 m

Anchorages No limit 8.5 m 11.5 m

8.5 m

11.5 m

Draught at anchor N/A 8.5 m 11.5 m

8.5 m

11.5 m

Draught at Berth N/A 8.55 m 9.2 m

8.55 m

9.2 m

Length Over All N/A No limit 186 m

No limitations

186 m

Beam (maximum) N/A No limit No limitations if length is 186 m

No limitations

No limitations provided length is 186 m or less


General Cargo Handling Equipment 

1

Mobile Crane

10-50 ton

51

2

Forklift Truck

10-20 ton

15

3

Forklift Truck

3-5 ton

130

4

Industrial Tractor

25 ton

12

5

Heavy Trailer

20-25 ton

07

6

Light Trailer

6 ton

30

7

Share Crane

2-3 ton

31


Container Handling Facilities

Facility

Capacity/Nos

Holding Capacity (GCB+CCT+NCT+NCY)

38,917 TEUs

Yards

22 Nos.

Container Freight Stations at GCB

5 Nos (45,064 Sq.m)

Container Storage yard at GCB

282,239 sq.m

CFS at CCT

13,671 sq.m

Container Storage yard at CCT

150,000 sq.m

Container Storage yard at NCT

220,000 sq.m

Container Storage yard at NCY

63,000 sq.m

Railway Container Siding

550 m

Reefer Points (440 volts)

900 points

Standby Generator

14 MW (2X7)

Water Reservoir

140,000 Gallons

Fire Brigade

1 Unit


Container Handling Equipment

Equipment Type

Capacity (MT)

Qty

Quay Gantry Crane

40

14

Mobile Harbour Crane

84

2

Rubber Tyred Gantry Crane

44

21

Straddle Carrier (04 High)

40

36

Reach Stacker (RS)

45

15

Forklift Truck

25-42

6

Forklift Truck

7-16

19

Reach Stacker

7

6

Container Mover

50

6

Terminal Tractor

50

43

Terminal Trailer

50

55

Container Facilities

 

At a time

Yearly

 

Container

6,000 (TEU)

100000 (TEU)

6,00,000 (TEU)

Cargo

60,000 (MT)

2,00,00,000 (MT)

4,00,00,000 (MT)

Car

2,000

20,000

40,000


Customs

Customs clearance process is also mainly paper based and appraisal and verification are done without standardized modern logistics support (container scanner). Procedural complexities, lack of transparency and timeliness in decision-making often caused lot of harassment and delay in the customs clearance process.

Since 2000, ASYCUDA has been introduced without the two main modules EDI and Risk Assessment Management.  The customs clearance procedures for import still consist of 13 to 16 steps, a cumbersome, redundant, paper ledger and list-oriented process. In the absence of modern technology in controlling & appraising method, problems of trust arise among the regulatory and trade body.


Food Handling Arrangements    

For offloading from ships and safe storage of food grains CPA has dedicated a silo jetty at North Patenga. There is a silo situated adjacent to the jetty. It is one of the biggest silos in Bangladesh with storage capacity of 100,000 mt. It deals with wheat only and is under the administrative control of the Ministry of Food of the Government of Bangladesh. The strategy for Chattogram silo is to use it predominantly for quick clearance of incoming mother vessels carrying imported wheat, for storage of a national buffer stock, to maintain quality of stored grain and quick dispatching to up-country destinations with maximum efficiency.

From an operational point of view, Chattogram silo can be divided into three sub-systems:

  • Receiving
  • Storage
  • Despatching


Receiving Sub-system

This silo has the facilities to receive food grain (particularly wheat) only in bulk through gantry. The objective of the system is as follows:

  • To start unloading as quickly as possible.
  • To unload grain from carrier within minimum possible time.
  • To record the weight of all incoming grain accurately.
  • To ensure safe storage.


Storage Sub-system

The Chattogram silo having a capacity of 103,804 MT of bulk wheat, it has 88 round bins and 54-star bins. The capacity of each round bin is 1,000 MT and the star bin is 225 MT. The silo is provided with a dust control machine. Existing fumigation on pest control systems is provided via a liquid spray system and peeled dispenser system, though it is rarely used due to non-infestation of the grain. The objective of this sub-system is to keep the grain in good quality. 


Despatching Sub-system

This silo has the facilities to dispatch food grain both in bulk and bagged form. In bulk it is mainly delivered by river coaster in Narayangonj Silo and Khulna Steel Silo and through hopper wagon in Ashugonj, Santaher and Narayangonj Silo. The bagged cargo is delivered mainly through railway covered wagon and through truck in almost all CSD and LSD in the country.


Specification of Chattogram Silo

Highest Capacity

103,804 MT

Diameter of Circular Bins

27’-0’’

Height of Bins

94’-0”

No. of Star Bins

54 (250 MT)

No. of Circular Bins

88 (1,000 MT)

Size of head house floor

34’ x 74’

Height of head house above finished grade

174’

Height of head house above airport runway

150’

Depth of head house board pit 

24’

Pneumatic travelling ship unloading unit

3 (600 MT/hour)

Pneumatic static ship

1 (200 MT/hour)

Receiving belt conveyor

3 (200MT/hour each)

Main Bucket elevator

4 (200MT/hour each)

Basement chain conveyor

8 (200MT/hour each)

Automatic hopper scale

4 (Computerized)

Truck scale (Weigh bridge)

1 (capacity 40 MT)

Distribution belt conveyor with tripper

6

Chemical Protecting sprayer

6

Sp. Fumigation bins

2

Grain Drier

1

Grain cleaner

1 (25 MT per hour)

Bagging scale

6 (8 bags of 85 kg/ min)

Temperature indication system

1

Truck loading (bag)

8

Rail loading (bunk)

2

Jetty length- (a) Unloading / Loading (b)

328 meters/42 meters

Sub station

3 units (each 1200 KVA)


Cargo Storage Space (Break-bulk)

Protected Area

Outside Protected Area

Transit Sheds (1-9)

09

64364 Sq Mtrs

Warehouses

06

25179 Sq Mtrs

Warehouses DFPO

04

20712 Sq Mtrs

Open Dumps

-

200,000 Sq Mtrs

Car Sheds (P & F)

02

8696 Sq Mtrs




Open Dumps

-

90,000 Sq Mtrs




Note: Food Dept for Grains, TSP complex, Cement Clinker and different Oil company have their own storage facilities adjacent to their own Jetties/premises.

Description and Contacts of Key Companies

For information on Bangladesh Port of Chittagong contact details, please see the following link: 

4.4 Bangladesh Port and Waterways Company Contact List


For information on Bangladesh Port of Chittagong additional information, please see the following document:

Bangladesh Port of Chittagong Additional Information

Bangladesh Chittagong Port Overview

Bangladesh Port of Chittagong Port Security

Note: The information provided in the attached documents, which has been taken from the old DLCA, does not match the structure of the new LCA and is therefore provided separately.



2.1.2 Bangladesh Port of Mongla

Port Overview

Mongla Port is the second busy port of 3 seaports of Bangladesh and is the eco-friendliest port. It is situated on the south western part of the country at the confluence of Possur river and Mongla Nulla approximately 71 Nautical miles upstream of the Bay of Bengal. It is located at Lat 22.48867 Long 89.59283. The Port is well protected by the largest mangrove forest Sunderbans, which has been declared as "World Heritage" in 1977 by UNESCO. Since 1950, Chalna Port started to function as Government Directorate and in May 1977, the directorate was concerted to an autonomous organization called Chalna Port Authority. The Chalna Port Authority was again renamed as "Mongla Port Authority" on 8th March 1987.

Mongla Port Provides facilities and services to the international shipping lines and other concerned agencies providing shore-based facilities like jetties, go downs, cargo handling equipment and maintaining adequate water depth in the channel as well as making provision for safe day and night shipping. Even if, in theory, there should be a ratio of 60 – 40 % between Chattogram and Mongla, the reality so far from that with Chattogram currently totalizing 92% of the country’s international trade.

Vision of MPA

  • To Handle annually 1000 ships by 2021.
  • To ensure international standard of service to the port users.
  • To create congenial atmosphere for flourishing port base industries.
  • To Modernize the port in the light of the global trade.
  • To create job opportunities and to provide remarkable financial income to the national exchequer.
  • To open new commercial windows for sustainable economic development.

Key port information can also be found at: Maritime Database information on Bangladesh

Port website: Port of Mongla Website

Port Location and Contacts

Country

Bangladesh

Province or District

Khulna District

Town or City (Closest location) with Distance (km)

Name: Khulna

km: 45 minutes from Kulna

Port's Complete Name

Port of Mongla

Latitude

22.48867

Longitude

89.59283

Managing Company or Port Authority (If more than one operator, break down by area of operation)

Mongla Port Authority

Management Contact Person

n/a

Closest Airport and Frequent Airlines to / from International Destinations

Airport Name: n/a

Airlines: n/a

Mongla Port Officer’s Contact List

Name & Address

Designation and email

Telephone and fax

Name: Rear Admiral M Mozammel Haque, (G), NUP, ndc, psc, BN,

Chairman

Email: chairman@mpa.gov.bd

Phone (office): 04662-75215

Fax: +041662-75224

Name: Yasmin Afsana


Desig: Member (Finance)

Email: mf@mpa.gov.bd

Phone (off): 04662-7514

Name: Md. Altaf Hossain Khan


Desig: Member (Engineering & Development)

Email: med@mpa.gov.bd

Phone (office): 04662-75333

Fax: 04662-75244

Name: Captain Mohammed Ali Chowdhury, (C), BCGM, ndc

Desig: Member (Harbour & Marine)

Email: chowali@yahoo.com

Phone (office): 04662- 75222

Fax: 04662- 75224

Name: Md. Gias Uddin

Designation: Director (Admin)

Email: da@mpa.gov.bd

Phone (office): +0466   2-75345

Fax: 04662- 75224

Name: Commander Sheikh Fakhar Uddin (C) BN

Designation: Harbour Master

Email: hm@mpa.gov.bd

Phone (office): +04662-75221

Name: Lt Commander M ABDUL ALIM, (N), BN

Desig: Chief Security Officer

Email: cso@mpa.gov.bd

Phone (office): +04662-75232

Name: Mr. Ohiuddin Chowdhury


Designation: Secretary

Email: oc2225@gmail.com

Phone (office): +04662-75275

Name: Md. Zahirul Huq


Designation: Chief Planning

Email: cp@mpa.gov.bd

Phone (office): +04662-75218

Name: Md. Mostafa Kamal


Designation: Director (Traffic)

Email: kamal6498@yahoo.com

Phone (office): +04662-75363

Name: Md. Faruqul Islam


Desig: Chief Hydrographer

Email: faruqulchmpa@gmail.com

Phone (office): +04662-75312


Port Facilities and Infrastructure             

Total Berths

Quantity

Length (m)

Draft (m)

General Cargo/ Container Berths

5

max 225 m

4.5 – 5 m

River Mooring Buoys

7

max 225 m

3 – 8 m

Anchorage Berths

14

max 225 m

4.7 – 9 m.

Mongla Cement Factory Jetty (Private)

1

max: 225 m

6.1m

Meghna Cement Factory Jetty (Private)

1

max: 225 m

6.5 m

Klean Heat Gaz Factory (Private)

1

max 225 m

6.0m

Summit United LPG Jetty

1

max 225 m

1.8m

Summit United Petroleum Jetty

1

max 225 m

Not available

Dubai-Bangladesh Cement factory Jetty

1

max 225 m

Not available

Holcim Cement Factory Jetty

1

max 225 m

Not available

Vessel Concrete Jetty 

1

max 225 m

Not available

Pontoon Berth (for Fresh Water

1

max 225 m

Not available

Pontoon berth (Inland vessels & Ferry)

1

max 225 m

Not available

Berthing Tugs & Mooring Boats

3


Pilot Boats

3

Water Barges (Dumb)

4 * 500 MT


Port Facilities at a Glance

  • The port is surrounded as well as well protected by the mangrove forest Sundarbans and free from all types of congestion of ships and cargo.
  • River and road transport facilities available comparatively at lower cost from Mongla port to all over the remote places of the country.
  • Constraint free large channel available for anchorage and loading/unloading facilities on both sides for 33 ships at a time.
  • Due to construction of Khanjahan Ali as well as Lalonshah bridge, good transport connection system has been developed from Mongla Port to all the hinterland of North Bengal.
  • Unique opportunity for Dhaka-Mongla-Dhaka transportation only within 5 hours by Dhaka-Maowa Road, in spite of a ferry service on the way.
  • As there is no by-crossing, the goods can be transported easily without any constraint by inland coaster/barge from Mongla port.
  • Up to 225-meter-long ship can enter into the port for discharging cargo.
  • No constraints in berth and less turn-around time.
  • In compare with Chattogram Port, the Landing charge, Shipping charge and River dues are lower in Mongla port.
  • 15 days free time available in case of handling empty container (Import).
  • The port is open for 24 hours.
  • Infrastructural facilities available for storage of both specialized and General cargo.
  • Handling & parking facilities of motor vehicles available.


Port Performance and Capacity             

Port performance in last 3 Years

Performance Type Export/ Import FY 2016 - 17 FY 2017 - 18 FY 2018 - 19
Vessel Handling  - 623 784 961
Car Handling  - 15,907 17,295 19,200
Container Handling (TEU's) Export 12,805 21,229 29,330
Import 14,147 21,760 28,408
Container Handling (Boxes) Export 8,094 14,032 20,290
Import 9,146 14,341 19,426
Cargo (MT) Export 85,622 147,151 135,131
Import 7,428,105 9,568,899 11,179,878
Food Stuff (MT) Export 31,452 33,278 35,011
Import 441,359 896,324 131,379
Total Income (Million BDT) - 2297.0 2664.2 -

 

Storage Facilities

Name Quantity Length/ Area Capacity
Mongla Port Area
Transit Shed 4 Nos. (5-8) 19,628 Sq Mtr 17,932 MT (Total Capacity)
Warehouse A&B 2 Nos. 19,630 Sq Mtr 15,326 MT (Total Capacity)
Container yard 4 Nos. 45,530 Sq Mtr -
Open dumps - 300,000 Sq Mtr -
Freezer plug points 160 - -
Car parking yard 2 For 2,000 cars -
Khulna Roosevelt Jetty Area
Transit shades 1 & 2 1,125 Sq Mtr -
Open dumps - 25,000 Sq Mtr -

 

Cargo Handling Equipment

Name of Equipment Number of equipment Capacity (M/Ton)
Mobile Crane 6 2x30 MT, 1x24 MT, 1x25 MT & 2x19 MT
Forklift various capacity 36 2-5 MT
Straddle carrier 6 -
Reach stacker 2 -
Jetty dock crane 2 -
Terminal Tractors 6 -
Empty container handler 3 -
Harbour crane 1 84 MT but 32 MT Extended Boom
Vessel & craft (various types) 32 -
Total 62 -

 

Container Handling Capacity


Item

Capability


Projected Capacity by 2025

At a time Yearly
Container 6,000 (TEU) 100000 (TEU) 6,00,000 (TEU)
Cargo 60,000 (MT) 2,00,00,000 (MT) 4,00,00,000 (MT)
Car 2,000 20,000 40,000

 

Clearing Agents / Stevedore

There are almost 600 clearance agents and around 100 stevedore companies. They are appointed on a yearly base, after a call for tender process. List of stevedors who have renewed their licence from Mongla Port Authority for the current year is as follows.

Port Stevedores list

Sl Name of the Organization Address Contact Number
1 M/S Sheikh Abdus Salam & Co. Madrasa Road Mongla, Bagerhat 01711343054
2 M/S A Haq Choudhury & Sons 2, P C Roy Road, Khulna 01711761747
3 M/S Khalid Brothers 67 Khan A Sabur Road, Khulna 01711335860
4 M/S Nuru & Sons Co Shromo Kollan Road, Mongla, Bagerhat 01713181224
5 M/S Gofur Brothers & Co Rabeya Complex, 116/2, Islampur Road, Shantidham More, Khulna 01711280124
6 M/S Khulna Traders Ltd. 6, Shamsur Rahman Road, Khulna 01711218888
7 M/S Pator Para Traders Port Using Building 6th Floor, 1st Flat, Mongla 01764527749
8 M/S Green Enterprise 53 Shromo Kollan Road, Mongla, Bagerhat 01711761668
9 M/S Lucky Trading Corporations 309, Khanjahan Ali Road, Khulna 01711896661
10 M/S M. A. Hashem & Sons 6/1, Madrasa Road, Mongla, Bagerhat 01711400797
11 M/S Jahir Traders Chalna House, 3 P C Roy Road, Khulna 01711380569
12 M/S Obiroto Agencies Ltd. 8, Baitun Nur Shopping Complex 01716781461
13 M/S K M Shipping Lines Ltd. 11, KDA Avenue, Nowshin Tower (5th floor), Khulna 01711296685
14 M/S United Trading Co. Rabeya Complex, 116/2 Islampur Road, Khulna 01711280124
15 M/S The Linkers International (Pvt) Ltd. 101, Haji Mohsin Road, Khulna 01711299179
16 M/S Khulna Union Enterprise Ltd. 205/8 Sonadanga R/A, Khulna 01711524649
17 M/S Moni Traders (Pvt.) Ltd. 13 Shrom Kollyan Road, Mongla 01713124709
18 M/S Mecca Medina Enterprise Shrom Kollyan Road, Mongla 01725378430
19 M/S Siraj Shipping Port Powerhouse Road, Mongla 0711482906
20 M/S Ahommed & Co. 17, Beni Babu Road, Khulna 01712608285
21 M/S Rahman Enterprise Port Building 6th floor, 3rd flat, Mongla Not Provided
22 M/S Khulna Agency 269/2, Khanjahan Ali Road, Khulna 01715368262
23 M/S Amin Enterprise 6, Lower Jeshore Road, Khulna 01711297825
24 M/S Morelgonj Traders 43/E, road 29, Nirala Residential Area, Khulna 01711481774
25 M/S M A Baten 5, PC Roy Road, Khulna 01711323620
26 M/S Aroj Ali & Co 92, Khan A Sabur Road, Khulna 01711131606
27 M/S S M Akbor Hosen 72, Sir Ikbal Road, Khulna 01711805124
28 M/S T Haq & Co. Ltd Monowara Mansion, room 1, 15, Dr. Moshiur Rahamn Road, Khulna 01813751155
29 M/S M Rahman & Brothers 63/4, Sonadanga R/A, Khulna 01711029460
30 M/S Sonar Bangla Traders 40, Station Road, Khulna 01713400138
31 M/S A Rajjak Dovash & Sons Ltd. Yakub Ali Building, Mongla 01711263316
32 M/S Associated Traders & Meriners Ltd. Khalil Chamber, 35, KDA Avenue, Khulna 01730007825
33 M/S Jebun Associates Ltd. Sheikh Abdul High Sarak, Mongla 01819685568

 

Port Essential Information            

 Port management

The port is under the administrative control of the Ministry of Shipping. The Chairman is the Chief Executive of the Port. Mongla Port Authority is managed by a board which consists of Chairman and three other members. Board formulates policies concerning operation, administration, finance and development of the port.  Other 11 departments are there to assist in performing port operation.

Port Limit

· To the North:  A line drawn due East West from a point in position Lat.  220 38.00’ N. Long 89020.00 E. to a point in position lat. 22038.00 N. long 89040.00’ E.

· To the South: A line drawn due East West from a point in position Lat. 21027.00’N. Long 89020.00 E. to a point in position lat. 21027.00 N. long 89040.00’ E.

· To the East:   A line joining the point in position Lat. 21027.00 N. Long 89040.00’ E. with the point in position Lat. 22038.00Ñ N. long 89040.00’ E.

· To the West:  A line joining the point in position Lat. 22038.00 N. Long 89020.00’ E. with the point in position lat. 21027.00 N. long 89020.00’ E.

Navigational Information

• Vessels of 6.0 m. to 8.5 m. draught can take berth in anchorage, mooring buoys and jetties. 

• Maximum LOA of vessels: 200 meters 

• Tidal range: between 1.2 and 3.5 meter 

• Pilotage : Compulsory 

• Night navigation is permissible for outward and inward movement of ships up to 140m. LOA and 6.0 m draught.

• 51 Lighted buoys are available at the Channel. “Conical shape" buoys are on starboard side and "can shape" buoys on the port side.

Hydrographic Information

The tides are important for navigation as determines the possibility of crossing the shallow outer bar at the entrance. The tides are semi diurnal with prominent diurnal effect. The approx. tidal range is between 1.2 m. to 3.5 m. all over the channel.

Anchorage 

Mongla port consists of shore-based facilities and a sheltered anchorage in the Pussur River. Depth of water available at the anchorage is max. 8.0 M. of LLWD. Distance from Mongla fairway buoy to Mongla port Jetty is 65 Nautical miles.

Restrictions

Entrance to the Pussur river is about 2 miles wide at the mouth and has a bar about 5 nautical miles from the Fairway Buoy where minimum depth is 6 m.

Maximum Size of Ships

Ships drawing up to 7 M. can cross the bar in all seasons. During S.W Monsoons vessels up to 8.0 M. can cross the outer bar in spring tide.

Telecommunication

At present coast station Khulna Radio of telegraph and Telephone Dept. maintain 24 hrs. W/T watch 0n 500 KHz (call sign S3E). In addition to the T & T system, the port has harbor control station (call sign S3H) at Mongla and Hiron point pilot station (call sign S3K) to maintain 24 hrs. W/T watch 0n 500 KHz. The station at Hiron Point guides incoming and outgoing vessels from fairway to pilot grounds and vice versa and also remains in touch with Khulna Radio, S 3 E, Mongla S 3 H and ships anchored at Hiron point for movement of pilots and Mooring of vessels.

Arrival Advice

Incoming ships must be present at Mongla Fairway Buoy at least 3 hours before H.W. at Hiron point, to enter on a day. The master should send the following information to Port Control via Khulna Radio call sign S3E and Hiron point pilot station call sign S3K 24 hrs. prior to arrival at Mongla Fairway buoy:

1.ETA Mongla Fairway Buoy 2. Fresh water draught 3. Speed available 4. Length of vessel 5. Gross tonnage of vessel 6. Flag of vessel 7. Fresh water requirements 8. Local Agent.

Tugs

3 powerful Tugs are available to attend emergency & also for berthing at jetties, Mooring buoys and Anchorages.

Berthing

8 single swinging Moorings, 21 Anchor berths & 5 Jetties are available.

Density

The density of water at the Outer Bar varies from 1005 to 1025 and at Mongla from 1002 to 1015.

Fresh Water   

Available by Barges

Fuel

Fuel oil can be arranged in Ltd quantities if 48 hours advance notice is given to the respective owner/declaring Shipping Agents.

Fire Precautions

Fire Fighting Tug is available.

Repairs

Minor repairs can be arranged through Khulna shipyard & other private workshops.

Surveyors

Lloyds / NKK, P & l Club and private surveyors are available at Khulna.

Deck Watchman

On receipt of orders from the Master the Steamer agents will arrange to supply necessary watchmen day and night.

Cargo Gear

Goods are loaded and unloaded by the ship's gear. Handling equipment and crane available at the Port Jetty.

Repatriation

Local shipping agents are responsible for arranging repatriation of the crew.

Police/Ambulance/Fire

Police Telephone number 04658-222 and for other purposes Harbor Control 004658-309 and Harbor Master's Telephone No. 04031-221 (off) & 041-760625 (Res) is available.


Miscellaneous Port Information (Berthing equipment specifications)

Berthing facilities

2 ships at the jetty, 5 ships at mooring buoy and 7 ships at anchorage and including private jetties total 14 ships can take berth at a time. Besides, there is wide scope of berthing of more ships in the anchorage. 

Jetty/Warehouse/Yard facilities

5 Jetties (length 182.92 meter each), 4 transit sheds (4907 Sq. m. each & total capacity in average 17932 MT), 2 warehouses (9815 Sq. m.) each & total capacity in avr.15326 MT),120 reefer plug points and 3 container yards (35752 TEUS at one stack).

Facilities in the Channel

Channel draft is 6.0 to 8.5 meter. For safe guidance of ship in the channel there are 21 lighted buoys (inner channel-3 buoys, outer anchorage- 16 buoys and fairway buoy-1) and 1 Beacon (at Hironpoint). Max. length of 200-meter ships can cross the Pussur channel. 

Electricity Facilities

For constant supply of electricity there are 6 sub-stations and 5 power generating stations. Moreover, special facilities are provided for reefer container from own generator of MPA

Vessels & Crafts

3 Tugboats, 01 Firefighting tug, 2 Pilot launch, 4 dispatch launch, 3 Survey launch, 4 Mooring boats, 1 Buoy Tender Vessel, 3 Self-propelled watercrafts, 2 Inspection launch, 1 Oil storage vessel, 2 ferry launch- total 26 vessels and crafts are ready for smooth functioning of Port.

One Stop Service


One Stop service is being operational in the Jetty area. In this, all departments who are directly involved in the Operation are being in one room. Therefore, the port users need not to move from one department to the other department in order to get their job done. This has created a very user-friendly environment and the activities have become easier and speedy.


Pilotage to the Port

The Pilotage ground extends from the fairway buoy, approximately at position Lat. 21026.9'N Long. 89034.4'E, to the northern limit of the port (Up to a line drawn between Lat. 22038.00' N Long. 89020.00' E and Lat. 22038.00' N Long. 89040.00' E).

The sharply defined "Swatch of No Ground" - the northern tip of which almost touching the pilotage ground, a nature’s boon to the mariners is approaching this port. A fairly accurate position of vessels can be obtained by watching the Echo-Sounder indicating entry of vessel into the "Swatch of No ground". It is usual for the navigators making approaches from Kolkata and Chattogram to proceed between 20- and 30-meter contour which is quite well defined and converge on the northern most tip of the “Swatch of No Ground ".

The lighted Buoy painted “MONGLA FAIRWAY" and fitted with a radar reflector flashing white light every 10 seconds, makes the approach to the Pilotage ground reasonably easy and safe.

From the ' fairway buoy' to pilotage ground (Near Hiron Point) the channel is marked by 9 pairs of lighted buoys with radar reflectors. Masters of vessels before approaching the pilotage ground should await instructions from the Hiron point pilot stations. Mariners are cautioned that they may have to take appropriate corrective measures as the vessels are likely to set towards North-West during flood tide.

Ship approaching Mongla Port will send their ETA and draft to their respective agents and to PORT KHULNA vis Khulna Radio (Call sign S3E) at least 24 hrs. before their actual time of arrival at the Fairway Buoy. On receipt of the ETA directly from the ship the pilot is detailed in order of priority of arrivals. Further instructions are issued by the pilot himself on VHF. On or before arrival at the Fairway Buoy, the Master is to contact the Hiron Point Pilot Station on W/T (Call sign S3K) or on channel 16 on VHF for bar crossing instructions. It must be emphasized that the instructions so received should be repeated by the ship receiving such messages. The banks of the river are stable and have continuous belt of forest with small creeks at places throughout the passage up to the Mongla Harbor area. The controlling bar at the entrance of Pussur River has a minimum datum depth of 6.0 M. This sets limit to the draft of ships entering and leaving Mongla Port.

Tides and semi diurnal with spring rise between max. 2.80 M. in winter to max. 3.35 M. in Monsoon. Tidal stations at Hiron Point, Joymonirgol and Mongla are maintained for observation and record of daily tides. Unlike other riverine ports of the Bay of Bengal there are no incidents of bore tides or freshets. During Monsoon the Hinterland Rivers are in spate and current may attain strength up to 6 knots. The bottom is mainly of mud and fine sand.

The channel is marked by buoys at various points conical shapes to be passed on the starboard hand and can shapes on the port hand when entering with the mainstream of flood. Weather is mainly tropical with very mild winter with minimum temperature of 8'C and humidity 95% and during south westerly monsoon from June to August causing rainfall of average 200 cm. Tropical revolving storm is formed in the Bay of Bengal during the preceding (April-May) and succeeding (Sept-Oct.) two months of Monsoon. The intensity of the storm is lost on reaching the port after crossing the coast and the Sundarbans. A common weather feature is the Norwester in the months of March and April which are typical thunderstorms of very short duration usually occurring at dusk with squally winds up to 40kts.

 

Port Dues and Charges 

Port Dues and Charges (as of January 2020)

Vessels chargeable

Rate of port dues

Sea-going vessels

0.241 $ per GRT

Sea-going vessel engaged in lightering within port limits

0.150 per GRT

Sea-going vessels not engaged in lightering have not left the port after 30 days from the date of entry

0.050 $

Sea-going vessel entering for taking fuel, stores and water, etc

0.08$

Vessels working within port limits, excluding sea-going lighters

Not exceeding 10 GRT: 25 BDT per vessel

Between 10 – 100 GRT: 200 BDT

Between 100 - 200 GRT: 500 BDT

Exceeding 200 GRT: 3 BDT per GRT

Barge/flat: 1.5 BDT per GRT

Country boat/Shampan: 0.25 per GRT.

 

Other Charges

Berth occupancy charges

Per GRT per day

0.03$

Mooring occupancy charge

At Own anchor

Per GRT per day

0.02$

At mooring

Per GRT per day

0.015$


Sea-going ships

200 to 1,000 GRT

Per Tug per Movement

82.50$

Over 1,000 to 5,000 GRT

do

277.50$

Over 5,000 GRT

do

594$



Water supply charge

At Roosevelt jetty

Per 1000 ltr

30BDT

At Mongla (local)

At Mongla (to Ships)

Per 1000 ltr

Per 1000 ltr

60BDT

10$

At Hiron pont (local)

Per 1000 ltr

700BDT

At Hiron pint (to ship)

Per 1000 ltr

20$


Jetty Crane Charge


Use of Jetty crane

Per crane per period of 8 hours

45$

Use of British crane

Do

33.75$


Non-Use of Jetty Crane

If cancelled within less than 6 hours of booked period

Do

40$

If cancelled previous to 6 hours of booked period

Do

20$

Holliday charge (working on jetty)

Per ship per holyday

60$

Night charge (working on jetty)

Per ship per night

30$

Security guard engaged on the sea-going vessel

Per person, per 4 hours

BDT 150

 

Shifting / Detention Fees

Services

Basis of Charge

Rate

Fees for shifting vessels from one berth or mooring or swinging her to another

Per movement

29.80$

Fees for such shifting taking place in whole or part between 6:00 pm to 6:00 am

Per movement

59.60$

Detention fees for failure of a vessel in arriving or sailing from the port in time

Per day

100$

Pilot detention fee

Per day

20$

Berthing or unberthing at the time of arrival or sailing of the vessels

Each occasion

88.50$

Same at the time of shifting

Each occasion

44.25$


Port & Harbour Dues

Services

Basis of Charge

Rate

River dues

Domestic cargo

Per 1000 kg

33BDT

Import cargo

Do

BDT 15.30




Landing charge / Handling charge

Bagged cargo (wheat and rice)

Per 1000kg

BDT. 40

Other bagged cargo (cement, iron, steel, salt, sugar etc)

Do

BDT. 32

All other imports not exceeding 3MT

Do

BDT. 90

Wheeled or tracked equip.

Do

BDT 175

Garments, cloths, cotton, etc

Do

BDT. 16

Crude refined oil, palm oil, soyabean oil etc

Do

BDT. 50

Other import more than 20 MT

Do

BDT. 250

Weight bridge charge

Per 1000 Kg

2.5BDT

Trans-shipment charge

At the same wharf

Per 1000 Kg

150% of landing charge

Terminal charge on river traffic

Per 1000 Kg

21.70BDT

 

Container Handling Charges

Services

Time

Basis of charge

Upto 20’ Container

Above 20’ container


Loading / Discharging


FCL Container


Per container

43.40$

65.10$

LCL Container


Do

130.00$

195.00$

Empty Container


Do

22.10$

33.20$





Container storage)

Loaded Container

1st 10 days

Per container

3.00$

6.00$

Thereafter

Do

8.00$

16.00$

Empty Container

First 7 days

Per container

1.5$

3.00$

Thereafter

Do

3.00$

6.00$

Over height Container (Loaded)

1st 10 days

Per container

4.00$

8.00$

Thereafter

Do

8.00$

16.00$

Over height Container (Empty

1st 7 days

Per container

3.00$

6.00$

Thereafter

Do

5.00$

10.00$


Reefer container Charge


Pre-trip inspection

Per Container

2.00$


Supply of electricity

Per Container per diem

8.00$

Monitoring service

Per Container

4.00$




River dues on container and Containerised Cargo



FCL Container and content

Import

Per container

408.00BDT

816.00BDT

Export

Do

184.00BDT

368.00BDT

LCLContainer and content

Import

Per 1000 kg

34.10BDT

Export

Do

15.30BDT

Empty Container

Import

Per container

102.00BDT

204.00BDT

Export

Do

102.00BDT

204.00BDT

Stuffing and unstuffing Charges

Stuffing

Per 1000kg

75.00BDT

Unstuffing

Do

92.00BDT

Transhipment charge

Per container

150% of the Loading or Discharging Charge.

 

Due and Charges on Goods

Rent Charge (Wharf rent) for import cargo (covered storage)

Basis of charge

0 to 7 days

8 to 14 days

For each additional day up to 22 days

Bagged cargo

Per 1000kg

6.50BDT

15.00BDT

25.00BDT

Iron and steal

Do

6.00BDT

15.00BDT

25.00BDT

Wheeled or tracked vehicles

Do

28.35BDT

80.71BDT

129.29BDT

All other imports

Do

10.00BDT

20.00BDT

25.00BDT

 

Space Rent Charge

Service

Basis of charge

rates

 

Cargo inside the protected area


First month


Per sq² / meter


46.88BDT

Second month

56.25BDT

Subsequent months

70.31BDT

Cargo outside protected area

Per sq² / meter

40.00BDT

Storage of gears equip and other

Do

40.00BDT

International transit

Do

30.00BDT

 

Goods Carrying Charges on board water burges

Khulna to Mongla

Per MT

100BDT

Khulna to Hironpoint

BDT 200

Mongla to Hironpoint

BDT 150

Food Handling Arrangements                 

Mongla Port is not very well equipped for the bulk grain handling. There are no vacuators, silo facilities and bagging machines at the port. No silo terminal at port level. But a small silo of 500 MT exists in Khulna and recently big modern silo is at Joymonir goal has been established.

Mongla Port Silo

In order to have Safe Storage Facilities of Food grains a modern Silo has been built at Joymonirgol, 17 km south of Mongla Port. The silo has a storage capacity of 50,000 MT in 30 different bins. The area is fully equipped with an Independent Jetty along with all types of handling facilities. So Mongla port is now fully ready to accept any quantity of imported food grains.

 

Reefer Cargo Arrangements

Reefer cargo particularly export of frozen shrimps is predominant through this port. In the container yard no. 1 & 2 there are 160 plug points to connect reefer containers. Electricity is being supplied from electric substations to the reefer container. For constant and uninterrupted power supply MPA has its own generators which are capable to supply power to 40 containers. Provision of 110 volt power supply for reefer container is also available in the container yard.

 

Port Development Trend

In Bangladesh, the industries are in and around Dhaka-Chattogram. The business community of Dhaka and its surrounding areas is less interested to import and export their cargo through Mongla Port because of lack of fair roads and bridges connection. The present government has given emphasis for the development of Mongla Port and pushes the construction of the Padma Bridge at Mawa point. When Padma bridge will be operational, the distance from Dhaka to Mongla will be 170 Km. So, the business community of Dhaka and its surrounding areas will be more interested to use Mongla Port for importing & exporting cargos as the transportation distance from Dhaka to Mongla will be shorter than Dhaka to Chattogram. 

At present, Jute & jute goods, frozen cargo and other general cargo are exported from Mongla port. Moreover, import of heavy machinery & equipment, fertilizer, food grain, sugar, motor vehicles, raw materials of industry etc. through Mongla Port will increase. As a matter of consequence, the act of establishing different types of new industries in the south-western part of the country, scope of huge employment, expansion of trade & business and overall activities of Mongla Port will increase and develop rapidly.


Ongoing Development Project

Sl

Project name; Estimated cost; Implementation period

1.

Capital dredging of cattle channels from Mongla port to Rampal power station. Estimated expenditure: BDT. 16650.00 lakh. Implementation: 2016 – 17 to 2018 – 19

2.

The development of existing infrastructure at the Mongla Port Authority's Roosevelt Jetty. Estimated expenditure: BDT. 2360.00 lakh. Implementation: July 2017 to December 2019

3.

Inauguration of the Vessel Traffic Management and Information System (VTMIS). Estimated expenditure: BDT. 4890.78 lakh. Implementation: 2017-18 to 2018-19

4.

Dredging at the Mongla Port Channel. Estimated expenditure: BDT. 71250.00 lakh. Implementation: July 2017 to December 2019

5.

Tug Boat Collection for Mongla port. Probable expense: BDT 4929.00 lakh. Implementation: January 2018 to December, 2018

6.

Surface water Treatment Plant set up for Mongla port. Probable expense: BDT 2472.50 lakh. Implementation: 2018 - 19 to 2019 - 20

7.

Dredging in the food silo area of the Harbor channel in Mongla port Probable expense: BDT 3638.85 lakh Implementation: 2018 - 19 to 2019-20

8.

Strategic master plan for Mongla Port. Estimated expenditure: BDT. 530.00 lakh Implementation: SEPA: 2016 to June 2019

9.

Essential Equipment collection for Mongla port. Probable expense: BDT 43352.00 lakh Implementation: July 2018 to June 2021

10.

Under PPP: Construction of 2 incomplete jetty of Mongla port Estimated expenditure: BDT. 41200.00 lakh. Implementation: 2016-17 to 2020 - 21

 

Projects in Approval Process

1.

Expansion and Modernization of the facility of Mongla Port:

1. Container terminal construction of Mongla port.

2. Container delivery yard construction at Mongla Port

3. Bobbing yard construction.

4. Multistoried Car Yard construction

5. of cattle on the channel of the Sinking rake removal

6. The main road of Mongla Port (Six Lane and bypass road)

7. River protection works at the Jetty area.

Probable expense: BDT 447744.97 lakh. Implementation period: 2022 - 23

2.

Collection of Trailing Suction Hopper Dredger. Probable expense: BDT 32000.00 lakh. Implementation: 2017 – 18 to 2019 - 20

3.

Upgradation of Mongla Port Probable expense: BDT 60146.90 lakh. Implementation: from 2018 – 19 to 2022 – 23

4.

Modern waste management at Mongla Port. Probable expense: BDT 32221.00 lakh Implementation: July 2018 to June, 2021

5.

Collection of 2 Oil recovery vessels, Oil boom and accessories. Probable expense: BDT 1000.00 lakh Implementation: July 2019 to June 2021

 

Future development Plan

  1. Gaining depth of 10 meters
  2. A total of 6 dredger collections including 2 Trailing Suction dredgers.
  3. Installation of the terminal at Akram Point & Harbaria and Container terminal at Joymonir gol.
  4. Construction of chopper hanger and collection of helicopters.
  5. Construction of International Truck Terminal.
  6. Construction of flyovers from Digraj to Mongla.
  7. Installation of fire safety system
  8. Construction of Port Bypass road (East Park).
  9. Collection of salvage Basel and medical ambulances etc.

 

Role of Mongla Port in blue Economy

Blue economy is a sea resource dependent economics. Blue economy, as well as an effective alternative to the 21st century challenge in protecting environmental degradation, has already built a strong position across the globe. In the world economy, ocean economy continues to contribute greatly. For large population of Bangladesh, employment can be done by the sea-based blue economy. The recent sea victory has opened the floodgates of the Blue Revolution.

 

Strategic plan by Mongla Port to implement the Blue Economy Initiative

Short-term (ongoing activities)

Mid-term plan

Long-term

1. Dredging till Rampal of Pusur channel. Project expense: 16650.00 lakh

1. Expansion and modernization of the facility of Mongla Port Probable expenditure of the project: 447744.97 lakh

1. Collection of modern Container and cargo handling equipment. Probable expenditure of the project: 30000.00 lakh

2. Development of Roosevelt Jetty infrastructure. Project expense: 2360.00 lakh

2. One Trailing Suction Hopper Dredger Collection. Probable expenditure of the project: 32000.00 lakh

2. Construction of Car Yard at Joymonir gol. Probable expenditure of the project: 10000.00 lakh

3. Introduction of the Vessel Traffic Management and Information System (VTMIS). Project expense: 4890.78 lakh

3. Upgrading of Mongla Port. Probable expenditure of the project: 658596.00 lakh

3. Construction of multi-purpose jetty at Joymonir gol. Probable expenditure of the project: 140000.00 lakh

4. Dredging at Outer Bar Project expense: 71250.00 lakh

4. Modern Waste Management System. Probable expenditure of the project: 19800.00 lakh

4. Construction of floating jetty at Akram Point. Probable expenditure of the project: 50000.00 lakh

5. Tug Boat Collection Project expense: 4929.00 lakh

5. Various of equipment collecting Probable expenditure of the project: 44252.00 lakh

5. The development and of the deer Point Pilot tower and construction of the building for the Light house attendant at the Jack ford point. Probable expenditure of the project: 10000.00 lakh

6. Setting up of surface water treatment plant. Project expense: 2472.50 lakh

6. Strengthening of fire safety system. Probable expenditure of the project: 2455.60 lakh

6. River Governance Program adopted. Probable expenditure of the project: 150000.00 lakh

7. Collection of mobile Harbor crane. Project expense: 4681.50 lakh

7. Setting up of existing jetty of Mongla port. Probable expenditure of the project: 2809.92 lakh

7. Building advanced and modern light towers. Probable expenditure of the project: 5000.00 lakh

8. Strategic Master Plan. Project expense: 530.00 lakh.


8. Helicopters and all facilities for the helipad. Probable expenditure of the project: 30000.00 lakh

9. Dredging in the food silo area of the Harbor channel. Probable expenditure of the project: 3638.85 lakh

9. Construction of yard and renovation of road including construction of Dolphin jetty at Roosevelt Jetty. Probable Exp: 15420.40 lakh

9. Collection of auxiliary vessels (in 3 different stages).


Probable expenditure of the project: 80000.00 lakh

10. Construction of 2 incomplete jetty of Mongla port (Via PPP) Project expense: 41200.00 lakh

10. Dredging to achieve 8 mtr CD on the Poshur channel. Probable expenditure of the project: 98500.00 lakh

10. Collection of high-powered rescue vessels.

Probable expenditure of the project: 3000.00 lakh


11. Collection of 5 vessels for Mongla port. Probable expenditure of the project: 25000.00 lakh

11. Car Career Collection.

Probable expenditure of the project: 500.00 lakh


12. Construction of Container terminal (1st stage) at Joymonir gol. Probable expenditure :100000.00 lakh

13. Oil Spill Vessel Collection. Probable expenditure: 8000.00 lakh

14. Construction of water refineries (2nd phase).

Probable expenditure: 10000.00 lakh

15. Construction of Container terminal (2nd stage) at Joymonir gol. Probable expenditure: 200000.00 lakh

16. Collection of Navigational aids. Probable expenditure: 5000.00 lakh

17. Construction of Port Centric city with Mega shopping complex. Probable expenditure: 200000.00 lakh

18. Dredging project to achieve 10 Mtr CD at Pusur river.

Probable expenditure: 150000.00 lakh

19. VTMIS Expansion project. Probable expenditure: 10000.00 lakh

 

 

Port Security Arrangement 

MPA has adopted ISPS Code well ahead of 1st July 2004. Strict physical security is being maintained as per Port Facility Security Plan approved by Designated Authority. MPA was issued with Statement of Compliance of Port Facility Security certificate on 26th September 2004. Security information with vessels is exchanged by Port Control station before entering port limit. Reasonable full proof security is being maintained with the deployment and cooperation of security personnel from different agencies in addition to her own security personnel. So far, the port authority and all the users are satisfied with the port security arrangement. The port authority is trying to have their own security personnel for the total coverage of the area. Port has updated and modern digital security equipment also in place. To ensure proper security at the port premises and Jetty area they have following personnel and equipment:


Human Resource

Sl

Description

Number

1

Security Personnel

29

2

Navy Contingent

37

3

Ansar Member

145

4

Private Security

100

Useful Equipment

Sl.

Description

Number

Comments

1

Baggage Scanner

2

-

2

Archway

6

Main Gate has 4, Gate No. 2 has 1 & Port Building has 1.

3

Car Barrier

2

-

4

CCTv Monitor

4

Main Gate has 2.

5

UVSS

2

-

6

UVIM

2

-

7

Container Scanner

1

Customs

8

Walkie Talkie

20

-

9

Hand Metal Detector

10

-

10

Access Control

2

Situated at the entrance and outside Gate

11

Access Control Monitor

3

-

12

C C Camera

81

32 are setup on progress

13

Mobile X-ray

1

-

14

Hand Mike

3

-

15

Motorcycle

3

One is on Main Gate

16

Speed Boat

1

-

17

Mike

1

-


For information on Bangladesh Port of Mongla additional information, please see the following documents: 

Bangladesh Port of Mongla Additional Information

Bangladesh Port of Mongla Berth Info

Bangladesh Port of Mongla container facilities

Bangladesh Port of Mongla Pussur Channel

Note: The information provided in the attached documents, which has been taken from the old DLCA, does not match the structure of the new LCA and is therefore provided separately.

For information on Bangladesh Port of Mongla contacts information, please see the following link:

4.4 Bangladesh Port and Waterways Company Contact List

2.1.3 Bangladesh Port of Payra

Port Overview

Payra Sea Port is the 3rd seaport of Bangladesh located in general area in between latitude 21.9890 North and longitude 90.2792 East on the bank of Rabnabad Channel under Kalapara, a sub district of Patuakali.  In order to increase the economic activities in the central zone and meet the future demand, Payra Sea Port Act 2013 was passed in National Parliament on 10 November 2013. Honourable Prime Minister Sheikh Hasina inaugurated country’s 3rd seaport named as “Payra Sea Port” at Rabnabad Channel at Patuakhali district on 19 November 2013.

Government has taken Short, Mid & Long-Term Plan to develop a state of art modern seaport. As Short-Term Plan, Payra Port Authority is set operate the port activities by offloading cargos from motherships at outer/inner anchorage and transported to the hinterlands through river routes. All the necessary preparations like Custom Clearance Facilities, VHF communication, Banking, enlistment of Ship handling operators, C&F, Shipping agent, Channel Marking with Laying of Buoys at River and approach channel,   Marking of Payra inner and outer Anchorage area,   Implementation of ISPS code, UN Locator Code, and port security including a Bangladesh Coastguard station with high speed vessel and manpower etc have been completed.

Under Long Term Plan, by 2023 the port would be fully operational with a 16 m channel where minimum 10 km container & other terminals with all other associated facilities like establishing EEZ, Airport, Port city, Dockyard/Shipyard, Echo Tourism etc centring to the port. The Port authority has taken a mega budget estimate under the Long-term plan by phases to complete the envisioned infrastructural facilities and make the port fully operational by 2015.

Presently the port users are using River Route connecting to Dhaka and other districts of the country. In the river route, vessels more than 4-meter draught with bulk cargo are plying day and night irrespective of tide. Various commodities including food grain, cement, fertilizer and other bulk are transported from Payra to Dhaka and other destinations through internal waterways.

PPA’S objective focuses mainly on providing necessary services and facilities to the port users efficiently and effectively at competitive price. Though PPA started its Ltd scale port operations by offloading bulk cargoes at inner/outer anchorage, with the passage of time PPA is going to handle maximum volume of container and bulk cargoes of Bangladesh using the geographical advantages, good hinterland connectivity

Port website: http://ppa.gov.bd/


Port Location and Contact

Country

Bangladesh

Province or District

Patuakhali

Nearest Town or City

with Distance from Port

Kalapara

5 km

Port's Complete Name

Port of Payra

Latitude

21.9890 N

Longitude

90.2792 E

Managing Company or Port Authority

Payra Port Authority


Port Picture

List of Officers- PPA

Sl

Name

Designation

Contact Details

1

Commodore M Jahangir Alam, (E), NUP, ndc, psc, BN

Chairman

chairman@ppa.gov.bd

+88029348421

Fax:+88029349175

2

Commodore Md. Ashraful Haque Chowdhury, psc, BN

Member (Harbour & Marine)

saidur611@yahoo.com

3

Captain M. Muniruzzaman, (E), BN

Member (Engineering and Development)

member_ed@ppa.gov.bd

02-9350125

4

Commander M Rafiul Hassain (TAS) psc, BN, (Rtd.)

Member (Admin & Finance)

member_admin@ppa.gov.bd

02-9349175

5

Mohiuddin Ahmed Khan (Joint Secretary)

Director (Administration)

director.admin@ppa.gov.bd

6

Md. Elias Reja

Chief financial and accounting officer

cfao@ppa.gov.bd

7

Quazi Wasif Ahmad

Chief Engineer

chief.engineer@ppa.gov.bd

8

Commander Haider Jahan Khon Emon (H-1), psc, BN

Chief Hydrographer

chief.hydrographer@ppa.gov.bd

9

Md. Nasir Uddin

Deputy Ch. Engineer (Jetty & Harbour)

dce_jh@ppa.gov.bd

10

Captain SM Sharifur Rahaman

Dock Master

dockmaster@ppa.gov.bd

12

Md. Saifur Rahman

Joint Chief Planning

jc_plan@ppa.gov.bd

13

Tayebur Rahman

Deputy Director (Admin)

sktayebcpa@gmail.com

14

Azizur Rahman

Deputy Director (Traffic)

dd.breakbulk@ppa.gov.bd

15

Captain Asif Ahmed

Pilot

pilot.marine@ppa.gov.bd

16

Mohammad Soadrul Amin

Deputy Director, MIS

dd.mis@ppa.gov.bd

17

Mostafa Ashique Ali

Executive Engineer (Jetty)

exen_jetty@ppa.gov.bd

18

Md. Abul Kalam Azad Molla

Executive Engineer (Harbour)

xen.harbour@ppa.gov.bd

19

Azizur Rahman

Assistant Director (Admin)

aziz.admin@ppa.gov.bd

20

Md. Rajibul Hasan

Assistant Director (Accounts)

ad.accounts@ppa.gov.bd

21

Md. Sohel Mir

Assistant Director (Security)

ad.security@ppa.gov.bd

22

Md. Sajidul Islam Sobuj

Assistant Secretary (Coordination)

asstt.secretary@ppa.gov.bd

23

Md. Asadulla Ashik

Assistant Engineer (Electrical)

ae.electrical@ppa.gov.bd

24

S M Imties Islam

Superintendent (Light and Mooring)

superintendent.lm@ppa.gov.bd

25

Md. Aminul Haque

Assistant Chief (Prog)

aminul.ac@ppa.gov.bd

01515201401

26

Anup Kumar Sarker

Medical Officer

medical.officer@ppa.gov.bd

27

Delwar Hosen

Personal Secretary

ps.chairman@ppa.gov.bd

28

Md. Rokibul Islam

Security Officer

rokib@ppa.gov.bd

 

Port Facilities and Infrastructure

Present Facilities of Port

As the port is under construction and lot of development works are going on to enrich the capacity and facilities of the port. However, some of the existing facilities are shown below:

Jetty

ONE jetty (80M) to be used as service Jetty for own use and Cargo handling usage in small scale.

Draught

Maximum allowable draught of ships at Jetty is 6 M only

Storage

One Transit shed of 1,00,000 Sq. Ft

Infrastructure

Office/Admin building, Officer’s BOQ, Staff Accommodation, Multi-purpose Complex, Generator, Sub-station and some other small buildings and Shades have been constructed.

Handling Equipment

  1. Mobile Harbour Crane with capacity 46 MT and 11 MT at 25 mtr. and 40 mtr. radius respectively.
  2. Mobile Hydraulic Crane- Capacity 30 MT
  3. Forklifts-2 (One 25 MT and One 5 MT Capacity)
  4. Terminal Tractor with flat type Trailer- Capacity 50 MT.


Port General Information

  • Established on the bank of Ratnabad Channel under Kalapara, Patuakhali.
  • Depth of the Seaport is 16 m (so far, the deepest)
  • The seaport is 2m above the Mean Sea Level
  • Capacity of the Container handling will be 5 times that of Chattogram Port
  • Located at the Central coastal zone of Bangladesh which is a Regional and International shipping friendly position
  • 57% of the total market share will be captured by Payra port against 42% of Chattogram Port.
  • Payra Port is well connected to the maximum districts by river route
  • Once the master plan is completed, it will be connected by Road, Rail and Air also.
  • Construction and development works are in progress.


Port various Data

Hydrographic Data

  • The least depth at the outer bar is 5.2 meters (approx.) from the chart datum (CD) i.e. Lowest Astronomical Tide (LAT).
  • The Least depth at the inner bar 5.0 meters from Lowest Astronomical Tide (LAT).)
  • Depth at Rabnabad Channel ranges from 11.0 meters to 25.00 meters and depth at Kajal-Tetulia river route from 4.2 meters to 17.5 meters. Max.
  • There is one bar at the mouth of the Rabnabad Channel called the Outer bar and the second the Inner bar at 2.5 km from the entrance of Tiakhali River.
  • The 72 nautical miles long Kajal-Tetulia river route is connected with high seas through Rabnabad Channel
  • This river route is presently suitable for plying with 4.0m meter draught from PPA Inner Anchorage to Dhaka and other destination. 

Salinity

Salinity at Rabnabad Channel varies from 0.1 gms/1000c.c at low water to 0.2gms/ 1000c.c at high water during monsoons and from 2.5gms/1000c.c at low water to 16.5gms/1000c.c at high water during dry season. Salinity at Kajal river varies from 0.15gms/1000c.c at low water to 3.3gms/1000c.c at high water during monsoon and from 10gms/1000cc at low water to 27 gms/1000cc at high water during dry season.

Width of Channel

The width of the navigational channel (5.0m. contour) varies from place to place. From fairway to the mouth of Rabnabad Channel there is no restriction of Navigational width. A minimum of 250 m Channel width is maintained in Kajal- Tetulia route.

Wind Velocity

The weather in Bangladesh is largely governed by the monsoon. The prevailing wind directions are from South to South East during the months of April through September. After taking easterly direction for a while the wind turns to the northerly and north-easterly directions, the later prevail from November to January. During the months of February and March, winds turn via westerly direction back to the Southerly to South Easterly. In excess of 20 Knots/ Beaufort wind scale 5 prevails for 6 percent to time while those in excess of 30 Knots/Beaufort wind scale 7 persists for about 0.1 percent of the time during cyclones i.e. During the transition between monsoon and dry seasons in May, October, and November. The area of Payra port experienced four severe Cyclonic water surges during the last 44 years. In 1960 & 1963 speeds recorded were 125 Knots Max. In 1970 and 1991 speeds were recorded 138 Knots max. and 180 Knots max. respectively.

Tidal Ranges

The tides are important for navigations as determining the possibility of crossing the shallow area between Payra Fairway and the Meghna entrance at Hizla point and the Bars within Port Limit. The tides are semi-diurnal with prominent diurnal effect. The approx. Tidal Ranges at Rabnabad Channel and Amirganj (Meghna juncture) from Chart Datum (ISLWL – Indian Spring Low Water Level which is 1.673m below mean sea level) are as follows: At Rabnabad Channel: 0.8m.-3.5m. (above ISLWL) At Amirganj (Meghna juncture): 0.7m-2.8m. (above ISLWL).

Night Navigation

The entire channel is demarcated by let- buoys. There is no limitation for night navigation for entering/leaving harbour.

Waves

The waves are generally low shown distinct relation with the wind. Maximum wave heights over 2m were recorded only on a few days during the small parts of days. The wave periods vary between 3-4 seconds of waves of about 0.5m and about six seconds for waves of 2m. These are from an observation made by NEI (Netherlands Economic Institute) 1972–1977.

During the months May to October freshets are expected, Freshets are caused by the normal velocity of flow of ebb tide augmented by the flow of an additional volume of water that drains into the river from the catchment area. Freshets are expected when rainfall intensity reaches 200mm in 24 hours.

The density of water varies at each turn of the tide. Masters are advised to obtain the Circular from the local agents and follow the instructions closely.

Anchorage

A wide anchorage is established at the outer and inner Anchorage of PPA:

LONGITUDE/LATITUDE

  • Inner Anchorage:  Lat 21°56΄N Long 090°17.8΄E.
  • Outer Anchorage:  Lat 21°21.9΄N Long 090°06.06΄E


Port Performance

Before being fully operational the port has started its activities. Since Nov 2013 till Mar 2019 the port has managed following 32 ships:

Sl

Name of Vessel

Flag

DWT

L x B

Draught

D.O.A

Quantity

1

Banglar Mamata

Bangladesh [BD]

15,877

154.16m × 22.26m

6.95m

15-Nov-13


2

Fortune Bird

Hong Kong [HK]

55,640

189.99m × 32.26m

6.80m

1-Aug-16

20810MT

3

FS Beach

Vietnam [VN]

8,215

136.4m × 20.2m

7.00m

14-Aug-16

12502MT

4

Battang Hari 30

Indonesia [ID]

1,630

95m × 19m

5.00m

6-Sep-16

1 unit

5

Matsumae

Panama [PA]

9,998

124.56m × 21.2m

5.00m

27-Sep-16

106Pckg

6

Kulsamut

Thailand [TH]

12,665

140.5m × 20.8m

7.50m

7-Oct-16

8000 MT

7

Teng Hang

Hong Kong [HK]

35,023

179.88m × 28.4m

7.30m

17-Oct-16

26000 MT

8

Combi Dock 1

Antigua Barbuda

10,480

169.4m × 25.73m

6.20m

30-Oct-16

1 Unit

9

Zealand Rotterdam

Netherlands [NL]

57,157

190m × 32.26m

7.30m

30-Jan-17

21195 MT

10

Desert Unity

Marshall Is [MH]

54,043

189.99m × 32.26m

7.30m

2-Feb-17

14700 MT

11

Canary

Marshall Is [MH]

57,825

189.99m × 32.3m

6.60m

14-Mar-17

17500 MT

12

Safesea Neha II

Liberia [LR]

53,389

189.99m × 32.26m

7.40m

2-Oct-17

21300 MT

13

Wish Way

Panama [PA]

21,243

156m × 36m

7.00m

25-Nov-17

1 Unit

14

Dubai Ambassador

Panama [PA]

56,060

189.99m × 32.26m

5.80m

17-Dec-17

12000 MT

15

Zhen Hua 15

Hong Kong [HK]

46,671

233.3m × 42m

8.30m

4-Jan-18

6547.16 MT

16

KSL Lake Hill

Panama [PA]

3,375

81m × 13.6m

5.50m

17-Jan-18

3000 MT

17

Icarius

Marshall Is [MH]

55,921

189.99m × 32.26m

7.05m

10-Feb-18

20000 MT

18

Kyriakos

Panama [PA]

29,926

171.45m × 27.02m

6.95m

26-Feb-18

14800 MT

19

NK Khaleda

Togo [TG]

2,594

83.78m × 12.7m

5.40m

1-Mar-18

2400 MT

20

Yin Fu

China [CN]

48,909

190m × 32.26m

6.60m

13-Apr-18

20000 MT

21

Tan Binh 136

Vietnam [VN]

29,887

170.7m × 27m

7.20m

19-Apr-18

17000 MT

22

Knossos

Malta [MT]

56,763

189.99m × 32.26m

7.30m

12-Aug-18

22000 MT

23

Development Way

Panama [PA]

31,287

215.00mx34.04m

12.30m

16-Oct-18


24

Sabada

Moldova [MD]

6,507

102.79mx17.03m

7.15m

12-Nov-18

6000 MT

25

Equinox Agnandoussa

Cayman Island [KY]

58,680

197.00mx32.26m

12.90m

20-Nov-18

56810 MT

26

Maria

Marshall Is [MH]

57,070

189.99mx32.26m

12.10m

30-Nov-18

50000 MT

27

Tiger Hebei

Hong Kong [HK]

63,483

199.9m × 32.32m

13.50m

19-Dec-18

62,290 MT

28

Mimi Selmer

Marshall Is [MH]

55,711

189.99m × 32.3m

12.30m

23-Jan-19

51,922 MT

29

Xin Chen Hai Yang

China [CN]

24,242

153.46m × 38.6m

6.00m

31-Jan-19

4 Unit

30

Sabada

Moldova [MD]

6,507

102.79mx17.03m

6.93m

19-Feb-19

6000 MT

31

Sabada

Moldova [MD]

6,507

102.79mx17.03m

6.95m

17-Mar-19

6000 MT

32

Ocean Bao

Hong Kong [HK]

63,577

199.9m × 32.26m

12.80m

27-Mar-19

58,306 MT


Important News of the PPA


List of Future development Projects

Sl

Project Name

1

Developing Infrastructure Support Facilities (DISF)

2

PPA Master Plan

3

Payra Port First Terminal (PPFT)

4

Rabnabad Channel Capital and Maintenance Dredging of Payra Port

5

Coal/Bulk Terminal (CBT)

6

Multipurpose Terminal (MPT)

2.1.4 Bangladesh Port of Matarbari

Port Overview

Matarbari Port is a proposed deep seaport in Matarbari, Cox's Bazar District, Chattogram Division, Bangladesh. The port will be full commercial opening by expanding Coal jetty for berthing of vessels for the Maheshkhali power plant in Cox's Bazar district. At least 16.3-meter-deep ships can be easily accessible Matarbari Port. With the depth of the proposed Matarbari port being 16.3 meters, every ship will be able to bring more than 8000 containers. Currently, vessels with less than a 9-meter draft can call at the country’s two seaports at Chattogram and Mongla.

JICA will build a 15-kilometer long channel for construction of Matarbari port. Main navigational channel will be 350 meters wide. The 100-meter-long jetty will be constructed under the port's financing. The deep seaport’s multi-purpose terminal will be ready for container shipping vessels by November 2022, and a coal terminal will be constructed by August 2022

In the first phase of construction, the container terminal will be built on 18 hectares, have a 460-meter berth, be able to accommodate 8,000 TEU vessels, and have an annual capacity of 600,000 to 1.1 million TEU. Later, the container terminal will be expanded, comprise 70 hectares, have an 1,850-meter berth, and have a 2.8-million-MT capacity. The multi-purpose terminal will be built on 17 hectares, have a 300-meter berth, and be able to accommodate vessels with up to 70,000 dwt. Its annual capacity will be 2.25 million tonnes

Key port information may also be found at: http://www.maritime-database.com.

Port Picture


Matarbari Deep Sea port at a glance

Port Location and Contact

Country

Bangladesh

Province or District

Maheshkhali Upazila, Cox’s Bazar

Port's Complete Name

Port of Matarbari

Latitude

21.6914°N

Longitude

91.8590°E

Managing Company or Port Authority

Matarbari Port Authority

To be opened

2023

Type of harbor

Deep sea port

Length of Nav channel

15-kilometer

wide of Nav channel

350 meters

Draught

16.3 meters


Envision of the port

In the first phase of stage one, according to JICA's presentation, the port will have annual handling capacity of 0.8 million TEUs of containers and 2.5 million tonnes of bulk cargos. The port will be connected to the national highway and also have access to Chattogram and Cox's Bazar.

In the second phase of stage one, the port will have three jetties ready for container handling and four to six jetties for multipurpose use by 2028. Meanwhile, its container handling capacity will grow to 2.8 million TEUs and cargo handling capacity will reach 2.5 million tonnes per year.

After the completion of the final stage by 2035, the port will have the capacity to handle 4.8 million TEUs of containers and 16 to 38 million tonnes of bulk cargos. By 2024, the port will have rail connectivity through Dohazari-Cox's Bazaar line. An inland container depot will also be built by then.

By 2035, the container terminal's berth will reach 1,850-metre on 70 hectares area. Japan has agreed to invest US$20 billion for Moheshkhali-Matarbari initiative, of which half will come from its low-cost ODA (official development assistance). The rest will come as private sector investment.

 

2.2 Bangladesh Aviation

Bangladesh Airport Map


Introduction to Civil Aviation Authority of Bangladesh (CAAB)

As a member of the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO), the CAAB is putting in place necessary infrastructural facilities for movement of domestic and international aircraft. To ensure quick and secured movement of foreign and domestic aircraft in the Bangladeshi sky territory, the CAAB builds and maintains airports, air traffic, and air navigation facilities; installs telecommunication services and provides other facilities for the passengers.

In the year 1985, the Government of the People's Republic of Bangladesh formed Civil Aviation Authority, Bangladesh (CAAB) vide Ordinance No. XXXVIII of 1985, titled The Civil Aviation Authority Ordinance, 1985. CAAB functions as the regulatory body for all aviation-related activities in Bangladesh. Aside from being the aeronautical service provider, it is also responsible for safe, expeditious, and efficient flow of air traffic within the Flight Information Region (FIR) bounded by the international geographic boundary of Bangladesh. This organization is the custodian of all airfields and allied facilities including air navigation facilities. With about 3,000 employees, CAAB operates and maintains the major airports in Bangladesh and all the air traffic control. For further details following link is pertinent: https://caab.portal.gov.bd/


Important Contact details of CAAB

Sl

Name

Designation and email

Telephone and fax

1

Air Vice Marshal M Mafidur Rahman BSP, BUP, ndu, afwc, psc

Designation: Chairman

Email: chairman@caab.gov.bd

Phone: +880 2 8901400

Fax: +880 2 8901411

2

Air Cdre Md. Khalid Hossain BUP, ndc, fawc, psc

Designation: Member (Ops & Plang)

Email: mops@caab.gov.bd

Phone: +880 2 8901405

Fax: +880 2 8901428

3

Md. Hafizur Rahman

(Additional Secretary)

Designation: Member (Admin),

Email: madmin@caab.gov.bd

Phone: +880 2 8901068

4

Md. Mizanur Rahman

(Joint Secretary)

Designation: Member (Finance),

Email: mfin@caab.gov.bd

Phone: +880 2 8901402

5

Shah Md. Imdadul Haque

(Additional Secretary)

Designation: Member (Security),

Email: mavsec@caab.gov.bd

Phone: +880 2 8901231

6

Group Captain Chy M Zia Ul Kabir GD(P)

Designation: Director (Flight Safety & Regulations)

Email: dfsr@caab.gov.bd

Phone: +880 2 8901406

7

Md. Abul Kalam Azad

Address: AFTN: VGHQYAYS

Designation: Director (ATS and Aerodromes)

Email: datsaero@caab.gov.bd

Phone: +880 2 8901404

8

Group Captain, Abu Sayeed Mehboob Khan, psc


Designation: Director, Hazrat Shahjalal International Airport

Email: dhsia@caab.gov.bd

Phone: +880 2 8901449

Fax (office): +880 2 8901450


Disaster Response by CAAB

Dhaka and Chattogram Airports Ready for Post-Disaster Needs

Airports of Dhaka and Chattogram are prepared to effectively coordinate and handle the massive influx of emergency supplies that floods in after any natural disaster. As part of a global joint initiative between DHL and UNDP, over 20 airport staff and government officials of both airports were trained in 2011 to manage emergency operations, assess local requirements and create detailed contingency plans. A refresher of the same training is currently (2019) being considered.

The UNDP-supported Comprehensive Disaster Management Programme 2010-2014 (CDMP II) will continue to work with the Civil Aviation Authority agencies to ensure that the training outcomes are integrated into the broader disaster risk reduction and preparedness activities.


Procedures for Foreign Registered Aircraft 

The provisions detailed here under are related to non-emergency periods. There are, apparently, no specific and detailed provisions for emergency relief operations. Nevertheless, as soon as an emergency state is declared by the authorities, specific procedures for international relief cargo will be edited and implemented.


 Entry

All flights into, from or over the territory of Bangladesh and landings in Bangladesh territory shall be carried out in accordance with the permission received from Chairman, Civil Aviation Authority and in accordance with the national regulations. Aircraft landing in or departing from the territory of Bangladesh must first land at or finally depart from an International Airport. The aircraft, after landing at airport shall not proceed further unless the pilot in command has obtained necessary customs and other clearances in writing from officer of such organization as duly authorized by the Government. No aircraft, including aircraft engaged in a scheduled air transport service, shall make flights into or in transit across the territory of Bangladesh except in accordance with the above conditions.

 

Scheduled Flights

For operation of regular international scheduled flights operated by foreign airlines into or in transit across Bangladesh, the following requirements must be met:

  1. The state of the airline must be a party either to the International Air Services Transit Agreement, 1944 or a party to bilateral air transport agreement with the Bangladesh Government or must obtain special permission under a bilateral agreement or arrangement.
  2. The airline must be eligible to make the flights under the provisions of a bilateral or multilateral agreement to which the state of the airline and Bangladesh are contracting parties and must have a permit to operate into or in transit across Bangladesh airspace. Applications for such permits shall be submitted to the Chairman, Civil Aviation Authority, Kurmitola, Dhaka-1229 well in advance.
  3. Aircraft belonging to or operated for or on behalf of the Government of South Africa, Israel and Taiwan are debarred from flying into or in transit across the territory of Bangladesh.

 

Non-scheduled Flights

If an operator intends to perform a (series of) non-scheduled flight(s) into Bangladesh for the purpose of taking on or discharging passenger, cargo or mail, he shall apply in writing to the Chairman, Civil Aviation Authority, Government of the People's Republic of Bangladesh, Kurmitola, Dhaka-1229 and obtain prior approval to carry out such operations not less that 15 (fifteen) working days in advance of the intended landing.

The application must include the following information in the order shown hereunder:

  1. Name, address and nationality of operator of aircraft;
  2. Type of aircraft, Nationality and Registration Marks of the aircraft;
  3. Call sign of aircraft;
  4. Date and time of arrival at, and departure from Bangladesh;
  5. Place or places of embarkation or disembarkation abroad as the case may be of passengers and/or freight;
  6. Purpose of flight and details of passengers and/or nature and amount of freight;
  7. Name, address and business of charterer, if any;
  8. Route to be flown;
  9. Such other information as may be required by the Chairman, Civil Aviation Authority.

 

Charter Flights

If an operator intends to perform a (series of) non-scheduled flight(s) for the purpose of taking on or discharging passengers, cargo or mail in Bangladesh to/from a place outside Bangladesh, he shall apply to and obtain prior approval from the Chairman, Civil Aviation Authority for the exercise of such traffic rights. The application must contain the particulars specified for non-scheduled flights.

No passenger or freight flights originating in Bangladesh for a place outside Bangladesh may be picked up unless the charter/or hire of the whole or part of the space on such aircraft, if considered to have been arranged through the agency of National Operator, and with the prior consent of the Chairman, Civil Aviation Authority of Bangladesh.

Charter flight(s) by Foreign Operators may be permitted provided the Charterer along with the application produces a declaration from the National Carrier stating that they (National Carrier) are not in a position to meet the requirement of the Charterer.

No advertisement in respect of such flights soliciting booking of traffic or purporting to notify availability of space in aircraft shall be made in any manner whatsoever, either by the person or the operator.

 

Charter Flights by foreign operators not exercising traffic rights when transiting through Bangladesh

Subject to the observance of the terms of the Convention on International Civil Aviation 1944, application must be made at least 3 working days before the intended flight, and obtain prior permission from the Chairman, Civil Aviation Authority of Bangladesh for fall aircraft of the Contracting states of the above-mentioned convention desiring to carry out non-scheduled flight into, or in transit non-stop across Bangladesh and to make stops for non-traffic purposes in Bangladesh. The application must contain the following particulars in the order shown hereunder:

  1. Name, address and nationality of aircraft operator.
  2. Type, Nationality and Registration marks of the aircraft
  3. Date and time of arrival at, and departure from Bangladesh.
  4. Purpose of flight and details of passengers and/or nature and amount of freight.
  5. Name, address and business of charterer, if any.
  6. Route to be flown.

 

Flights of State Aircraft

If a State intends to perform a (Series of) non-schedule flight(s) into Bangladesh to operate military aircraft, it shall apply to the Government of Bangladesh, Ministry of Affairs, Dhaka, Bangladesh (Telegraphic Address- (PARARASTRA DHAKA) for permission to carry out such operation not less than 15 (fifteen) working days in advance of the intended landing. The application must include the following information in the order shown hereunder:

  1. Name of operator, Type of aircraft and registration marks.
  2. Date and time of arrival and departure from Bangladesh.
  3. Place or places of embarkation or disembarkation of passengers and/or freight, etc.
  4. purpose of flight and number of passengers and/or nature and amount of freight.
  5. Route of flight.
  6. A certificate to the effect that " No war-like materials, such as arms, ammunition, explosives (except escape/aid explosives), pyrotechnics (except very pistol signal cartridges) nuclear fissionable materials, ABC gases, photographic equipment and materials (whether installed or
  7. not electronic devices other than required for normal operation of the aircraft, are being carried by the aircraft.


Documentary requirements for clearance of aircraft

It is necessary that the under mentioned aircraft documents be submitted by airline operators for clearance on entry and departure of their aircraft to and from Bangladesh. All documents listed below must follow the ICAO standard format as set forth in the relevant appendices to Annex 9 and are acceptable when furnished in English and completed in legible handwriting.


Aircraft documents required for arrival and departure:

Required by

General Declaration

Passenger Manifest

Cargo Manifest

Customs Officer

1

2

2

Immigration Officer

1

1

...

Airport Health Officer

2

1

...

Plant Quarantine Officer

1*

1*

1*

* For arriving aircraft only

 

Notes:

  1. One copy of the General Declaration is endorsed and returned by Customs, Signifying clearances.
  2. If no passengers are embarking (disembarking) and no articles are laded (unladed), no aircraft documents except copies of the General declaration need be submitted to the above authorities.

 

Public health measures applied to aircraft

All international travelers coming to Bangladesh from yellow fever zone or in transit through yellow fever zone must possess a valid International Certificate of yellow fever vaccination. There will not be any exception for age, sex and status.

Yellow Fever: The vaccine used must be approved by the WHO and the vaccination centre must be notified by the WHO. Yellow fever epidemic zones of Africa and South America are given below: 

Africa: Angola, Benin Botswana, Burundi, Central African Republic, Chad, Congo, Equatorial Guinea, Ethiopia, Gabon, Gambia, Ghana, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Ivory Coast, Kenya, Liberia, Malawi, Mali, Mauritania, Niger, Nigeria, Rwanda, Sao Tome and Principe, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Somalia, Sudan (South of 15 N), Togo, Uganda, United Republic of Cameroon, United Republic of Tanzania, Upper Volta, Zaire, Zambia. 

South America: Belize, Bolivia, Brazil, Colombia, Costa Rica, Ecuador, French Guiana, Guatemala, Guyana, Honduras, Nicaragua, Panama, Peru, Suriname, Trinidad, Tobago and Venezuela,

Note: When a case of yellow fever is reported from any Country, that country is regarded by the Government of Bangladesh as infected with yellow fever and is added to the above list.

In case any traveler fails to produce such valid certificate he will either not be permitted to enter Bangladesh or will be isolated till he is considered free from infection by local Health Administration. A simplified E/D-cum Health Card is to be filled in by an arriving passenger of all categories. Desensitization of aircraft in flight is not acceptable. However, spraying on the ground is not required provided a "Desensitization Certificate" from the place of origin is carried on the aircraft. Aircraft and aircrew engaged on non-scheduled flights to Bangladesh shall comply with the requirements of the Convention on International Civil Aviation (Chicago, 1944) and the national regulations in force in Bangladesh. 

Cabotage Carriage

No passenger or freight originating at a point in Bangladesh and destined for another point in Bangladesh may be picked up by a foreign operator. If an operator intends to perform a (series of) non-scheduled flight(s) originating at a point in Bangladesh and destined for another point in Bangladesh for the purpose fo taking or discharging passengers, cargo or mail, he shall have to provide satisfactory evidence that no Bangladesh registered operator is in a position to carry the passengers or freight available between the two points in Bangladesh. Thereafter, he shall apply to the Chairman, Civil Aviation Authority for permission to carry out such charter flights. 

Other Commercial Flights

If an operator intends to perform a (series of) non-scheduled commercial flight(s) e.g. Business flights, survey flights or spraying flights in Bangladesh he shall apply giving details of the flights(s) to the Chairman, Civil Aviation Authority, Kurmitola, Dhaka-1229 for permission to carry out such operations. Grant of permission will be governed by the merits of the individual cases of consultation with any other department of Government of Bangladesh that may be concerned. 

Employment of foreign aircraft for public transportation or aerial works

An aircraft not registered in Bangladesh is precluded from employment as a public transport aircraft or an aerial work aircraft in Bangladesh territory without special permission from the government of Bangladesh, an aircraft owned by a person other than a national of Bangladesh who is resident in resident in or carrying on business in Bangladesh may be registered as Bangladesh aircraft, but is precluded from employment as public transport aircraft or an aerial work aircraft without special authorization from the chairman, CAAB.

Cargo
Regulations concerning importation, transshipment and exportation of cargo

Customs requirements: Carriage of arms and explosives

  1. The Carriage in aircraft of any arms, ammunition, explosives, military stores or articles of highly inflammable nature is prohibited under the Bangladesh Aircraft Rules, except explosives or other articles required exclusively for the working of the aircraft and such arms and ammunition as may reasonably be required for private use.
  2. No civil registered aircraft, whether national or foreign shall carry ammunition of war or implements of war in or across the territories of Bangladesh.
  3. Sporting arms and ammunition, explosives (other than those which are used for handling and operating an aircraft), poisons, corrosive liquids or irritant gases, as aesthetic gases, liquids and compounds, flammable solids, liquids or gases, oxidizing materials shall not be carried in bulk on any passenger carrying aircraft, whether national or foreign in or across the territory of Bangladesh except in such quantities as may be notified from time to time.
  4. When any of the articles mentioned in above is carried, the carrier shall ensure that:
    1. The quantity is within the prescribed limits;
    2. It is properly and securely packed and correctly labeled showing the content of the package with appropriate instructions for handling;
    3. It is stored in such a place that if the container is damaged, the crew, passenger and the main structure of the aircraft is not likely to endangered by its effects.
    4. Articles mentioned in paragraph 3 may be transited in bulk through Bangladesh on a foreign registered aircraft provided the owner of the aircraft has obtained prior permission of its Government for conveyance of the cargo on board and 24 hours advance notice of the arrival of aircraft is given to the Airport of intended landing in Bangladesh.

A list of articles which are classified a "Prohibited Cargo" or "Dangerous Cargo" is available at all civil aerodromes.

 Plant Quarantine Requirements: Importation of Plants and seeds

The importation of plants and seeds into Bangladesh is governed by special rules. In every case where it is intended to carry plants or seeds on aircraft entering Bangladesh, enquiries should first be made from the Department of Plant Protection, Ministry of Agriculture, Agricultural Complex, Farmgate, Dhaka.

 Customs Duty on Airport

No customs duty is levied on an aircraft which is in transit or is to make a temporary stay in Bangladesh for a period of less than six months, However, declaration must be supplied to the Customs Officer at the Airport of entry that the aircraft is in transit or that it is intended to re-export the aircraft within this period.

 Wireless Apparatus

In Conformity with the provisions of the International Telecommunications Convention (Atlantic City, 1947) aircraft entering Bangladesh carrying radio transmitting apparatus are required to have a license3 for the apparatus and the operator must hold a certificate of competency. If an aircraft equipped with wireless apparatus arrives in Bangladesh and does not carry the required license and certificate issued by the State in which it is registered, a license for the apparatus and a certificate for the operator must be obtained from the General Manager, Telephones (Wireless Branch), Dhaka, before proceeding. 

Airports in Bangladesh

CAAB regulates and maintains total 3 International airports and 7 Domestic airports (of which 2 airports are left unused) and 4 STOL (Short Take-Off and Landing) ports for the convenience of airlines as and when necessary specially in time of crisis. Of the 14 Airports and STOL ports of CAAB, 13 are being operated on subsidy. Hazrat Shahjalal International Airport is the only airport of the Authority, which has surplus earning over its expenditure.


 International Airports

  1. Hazrat Shahjalal International Airport, Dhaka
  2. Shah Amanat International Airport, Chattogram
  3. Osmani International Airport, Sylhet

Domestic Airport

  1. Cox's Bazar Airport
  2. Saidpur Airport
  3. Shah Makhdoom Airport, Rajshahi
  4. Jashore Airport
  5. Barisal Airport
Short Take-off and Landing
  1. Tejgaon
  2. Lalmonirhat
  3. Thakurgaon
  4. Ishurdi
  5. Shamshernagar
  6. Cumilla
  7. Bogura

Note:

Place for another airport named Khan Jahan Ali airport is air marked near Mongla Port, Bagerhat and at present its boundary wall is under construction.


Key airport information may also be found at: World Aero Data information on Bangladesh

For information on Bangladesh airports contact details, please see the following link:

4.5 Bangladesh Airport Contact List




2.2.2 Bangladesh Shah Amanat International Airport

Location Details
Country Bangladesh Latitude 22.24972
Province / District Chittagong Longitude 91.81333
Town or City (Closest)

Chittagong

10 NM N South of Chittagong City

Elevation (ft and m) 12 ft / 4 m
Airfield Name Shah Amanat International Airport IATA and ICAO Codes CGP / VGEG
Open From (hours) 00.00 Open To (hours) 00.00


Introduction and Overview

Shah Amanat International Airport (SAIA) is the second-largest international airport in Bangladesh after Shahjalal International Airport in Dhaka. The airport is operated and maintained by the Civil Aviation Authority of Bangladesh. It is used by the Bangladesh Air Force as a part of 'BAF Zahurul Haq Base'. It was renamed on 2 April 2005 after an Islamic saint, Shah Amanat. It is capable of annually handling approx. 2 million passengers and 10,000 MTs of cargo. SAIA also serves as a base to Arirang Flying School. The airport is in the Patenga area of the city, 20 kilometres west from the city's main commercial hub, GEC Circle and 18.5 km south of the city's railway station on the north bank of the Karnaphuli River.

The airfield was built in the early 1940s under the British rule. Known as Chattogram Airfield during World War II, it was used as a combat airfield, as well as a supply point and photographic reconnaissance base by the United States Army Air Forces' Tenth Air Force during the Burma Campaign 1944-1945. After liberation initially it was mainly used for connecting Dhaka and Chattogram. But in the mid-1990s Bangladesh Biman started it’s international flights to Bangkok, Dubai and all other major Gulf cities and it officially became an international airport.

In March 1998, a major renovation and expansion began, which ended in December 2000. CAAB received financial assistance from the Japan International Cooperation Agency for the US$51.57 million upgrade. The upgrade modernised the terminal with new and better seats, more check-in counters, better security equipment and other facilities. The Air Traffic Control tower received new hi-tech equipment such as 3D radar. The runway, taxiways and the tarmac were expanded and improved. After the upgrade, aircraft such as the Boeing 747-400 or the Airbus A 340 can land easily. The Airport is ICAO certified in 2005.

Contact details of the Airport:

Name & Address

Contact Names & Email

Telephone & Fax

Shah Amanat International Airport, Chattogram

Name: Wg Cdr Sarwar-e- Zaman

Title: Airport Manager

Email: apmctg@caab.gov.bd

Tel: 880 31 2500900 (off)
Tel: 880 31 2500953 (res)
Cell   : 01708167272
AFS         : VGEGYDYX

 

General Information of SAIA

Briefly Runway and Apron

Runway & Lighting

 

Single Backtrack Runway 05/23 2940m X 45m

PCN 66 F/C/X/T

Runway end turning pads 120m X 80m

Precision approach CAT1 lights on RWY 23

Simple approach lights RWY 05

CAT-1 ILS System for RWY23

Apron

Single Apron 750’ X 430’ with head of stand roadway surrounded by soft grassy areas

Four main parking stands are nose in – push out configuration.

Standard parking: 2x747-400 + 1x DC10+1 xA380

Dense parking: Standard Parking + 4AN12’s

Two taxiway entrances / exits

Lighting masts at the head of each stand.

Two fixed air bridges which are capable of handling Boeing 747-400 sized A/C.


Terminal building

The airport's sole 20,000 m2 passenger terminal is divided into two parts: International and Domestic with a boarding bridge in each. The International part of the terminal is larger than the Domestic one due to higher number of passengers. The building is divided into two floors: The lower floor is used for checking in, boarding or getting off small planes and receiving luggage. The upper floor is used for boarding or getting off large planes only. The 2nd Terminal Building is in the active consideration of authority.

Following are some dotted points of the existing Terminal:

  • Modern concrete arrival / departure terminal capable of handling approx 2 million passenger per annum.
  • 4 departure lounges with suitable seating areas capable of holding 1500 people in total.
  • 16 check-in desks.
  • 1 domestic arrivals hall and 1 large international arrivals hall.
  • Overall size of the terminal building is 18,600m².
  • Total number of Bays- 10 (6-Old and 4-New).

 

Control Tower

The Air Traffic Control Tower is 50 meters west of the airport terminal. This single ATC tower controlling both commercial and military operations. It has a clear view of the tarmac and taxiways but is far from the runway. Heavy rain or fog can make it difficult for controllers to see planes taking off or landing. At present total 16 civilian ATC staff supplemented by BAF controllers work here. They provide 24-hour ATC coverage; however, normal operations are 18-20-hour days. No traffic flow restrictions.

Contact : Senior Air Traffic Control Officer, Phone : +88 0312 500 954 and +88 0312 500 982

 

Taxiway and Tarmac

The airport has 2 taxiways, Alpha and Bravo, that directly leads to the tarmac (or aircraft parking zone) from the runway. The tarmac can accommodate a maximum of four aircraft; two wide-body Boeing 747-400s, a wide-body McDonnell Douglas DC-10 and a narrow-body Airbus A320 can be parked there at once. The airport has two boarding bridges and two passenger steps. The parking points are usually empty as most of the planes that arrive there take off soon after. A small civil plane hangar belonging to Biman is available but is rarely used.

The Bangladesh Military has a parking zone and two plane hangars east of the runway. The Bangladesh Air Force store a few planes here, which have direct access to the runway.

 

Runway Details

Airport ID

Dimensions

Surface

PCN

ILS

05/23

9646 x 150 feet

2940 x 46 meters

PART CONCRETE, PART ASPHALT, OR PART BITUMEN-BOUND MACADAM.

66 FCXT

YES

Description

Runway 05

Runway 23

Surface

Part Concrete, Part Asphalt, or Part Bitumen-Bound Macadam.

Part Concrete, Part Asphalt, or Part Bitumen-Bound Macadam.

True Heading

004.80

228.0

Latitude

22.240814 (22° 14' 26.93" N)

22.258406 (22° 15' 30.26" N)

Longitude

91.802653 (091° 48' 09.55" E)

91.823919 (091° 49' 26.11" E)

Elevation

12.0 feet (4 meters)

12.0 feet (4 meters)

Slope

0.0°

0.0°

Landing Distance

9646 feet (2940 meters)

9646 feet (2940 meters)

Takeoff Distance

10840 feet (3304 meters)

9846 feet (3001 meters)

Overrun Length

1194 feet (364 meters)

200 feet (61 meters)

Overrun Surface

Asphalt

Asphalt

Lighting System

A4 -PAPI-Portable Lights

A1-PAPI-Portable Lights


Airport Data

Geographical and Administration Data

1.

ARP* coordinates and site at AD*

221525.28N, 0914919.95E; in the runway

2.

Distance and direction from city

10 NM (18.5 km) south of City railway station

3.

AD elevation/reference temperature

Elev: 12ft / T: 32degree C (April)

4.

Magnetic variation

55' West in 1985 (Annual change negligible)

5.

Type of traffic permitted

IFR/VFR

Rescue and Fire Fighting Services

1.

AD category for fire fighting:

Required category 7, available category 7.

2.

Rescue equipment available:

Available to meet the ICAO requirement for category 7.

3.

Disable Aircraft Removal

Nil (But in crisis assistance will be provided from Dhaka)

4.

Seasonal Availability Clearing

The airport is available for all seasons. Side strips become unusable during monsoon. There is no requirement for clearing.

Surface Movement Guidance, Control System and Markings

1.

Use of aircraft stand ID signs, TWY guidelines and visual docking/ parking guidance system of aircraft stands

Taxiing guidance signs at all intersections with TWY and RWY at all holding positions, Guidelines at apron, Nose-in guidance at airport stands.

2.

RWY and TWY markings and LGT

RWY: 05/23. white, omni-directional.
THR LGT: green.
TWY: blue edge lights for all taxiways.
RWY marking aids: THR, TDZ, Centre Line, RWY designator - all runways
TWY marking aids: TWY holding position, TWY centre line - all TWYs.

Aerodrome Obstacles

In approach/Take-off areas

In circling area

RWY affected

Obstacle type;
Elevation

Position

Marking/ Light

Remarks

Obstacles in the circling area at aerodrome are shown on the instrument approach charts and page VGEG AD 2-9 of AIP. All obstruction are provided with day marking and obstruction lighting where necessary and feasible.

23

Hill
132 ft

064 deg M FM THR RWY 23

No

River Karnaphully flows around RWY23. Masts of ships and boats may constitute mibile obstructions on approach.

Meteorological Information Provided

1.

Associated Met office

Shah Amanat Intl. (VGEG)

2.

Hours of service

H24

3.

Office responsible for TAF preparation and Periods of validity

Shah Amanat Intl. (VGEG); 12

4.

Type of landing forecast Interval of issuance

TREND; 1/2 hourly

5.

Briefing/consultation provide

P, D, T

6.

Flight documentation and Languages used

C, PL; English

7.

Charts and other information available for briefing or consultation

S,U

8.

ATS units provided with information

TWR

9.

Additional information

Tel: 880-31-740788,
880-31-741532 Ext: 2006, 2201

Declared Distances

RWY

TORA (m)

TODA (m)

ASDA (m)

LDA (m)

Remarks

05

2940

2940

3000

2940

nil

23

2940

2940

3000

2940

nil

RWY: Runway; TORA: Take-off Run Available; TODA: Take-off Distance Available; ASDA: Accelerate-Stop Distance Available; LDA: Landing Distance Available.

Approach and runway lighting

RWY designator

APCH LGT type
LEN INTST

THR LGT color WBAR

VASIS (MEHT) PAPI

TDZ LGT LEN

RWY centre line LGT

RWY edge LGT LEN, spacing, color INTST

RWY end LGT color WBAR

SWY LGT

Remark

05

Simple approach lighting system

Green

3 deg
PAPI

nil

nil

Last 2000 ft amber rest white omnidirectional with intensity 20%, 40%, 60%, 80%,  100%

Red unidirectional

Green omnidirectional

nil

nil

23

Simple approach lighting system

Green

3 deg
PAPI

nil

nil

Last 2000 ft amber rest white omnidirectional with intensity 20%, 40%, 60%, 80%,  100%

Red unidirectional

Green omnidirectional

nil

nil

Other Lighting, Secondary Power Supply

1.

ABN/IBN location, characteristics and hours of operation

ABN: Over new water tank Altn FLG W G EV 5 Sec (Hours: HN and IMC)

2.

LDI location and LGT

Anemometer location and LGT

Nil
Anemometer end of RWY 05/23, windsocks end of RWY 05/23. LGT.

3.

TWY edge and centre line lighting

Edge: Blue edge lgts for all TWYs
Centre Line: Nil

4.

Secondary Power Supply/ Switchover time

During main power supply failure, Automatic standby generator power supply available within 11 seconds. Kerosene flares availabl.

5.

Remarks

APRON LIGTHS: available

ATS Airspace

Designation

Chattogram Control Zone

1.

Lateral limits

A circle of 25 NM radius central on Chattogram VOR (221527.85N 0914938.93E).

2.

Vertical limits

FL 145 AGL

3.

Airspace

C

4.

ATS unit call sign/ Language

Chattogram Tower/ English

5.

Transition altitude

4000 ft

Designation

Air Traffic Zone (ATZ)

1.

Lateral limits

ATZ is oval shaped area joining outer tangents of 5 NM (9 km) radius circles centered at the runway centre and both ends of runway

2.

Vertical limits

4000 ft ALT

3.

Airspace

C

4.

ATS unit call sign/ Language

Chattogram Tower/ English

5.

Transition altitude

4000 ft

ATS Communication Facilities

Service designator

Call sign

Frequency

Hours of operation

Remarks

Aerodrome and Approach Control (Non-Radar)

Chattogram Tower

118.7 MHz

HO*

Emergency frequency 121.5 MHz; EM: A3

Surface Control Movement (SMC)

Chattogram Tower

112.8 MHz

HO

EM: A3

DATIS

Chattogram Information

127.6 MHz

HO


*HO: Service available to meet operational requirements

Radio Navigation and Landing Aids

Type

Ident

Freq

OpHr

Coordinates

Remarks

DVOR

CTG

113.4 MHz

H24

221527.85N
0914938.93E

373m from THR RWY23.  EM:A2

DME
(En-Route)


1168 MHz

H24

221527.85N
0914938.93E

Collocated with DVOR, Elev of Antenna 45ft AMSL, EM:P9

NDB

EG

287 kHz

H24

221504.61N
0914904.53E

2205m fm THR RWY23, EM:A0/A2

ILS/LLZ

ICG

110.5 MHz

HO


144 deg MAG, 550m FM THR RWY 32, EM:A2

ILS/GP


332.6 MHz

HO


Slope: 3 deg, 130 m off-set East, 300 m inward fm RWY 14, RDH 51.57 ft, EM:A3

TDME


1003 MHz

HO


Collocated with GP

MM


75 MHz

HO


049 deg MAG, 905m FM THR RWY 23

HO: Service available to meet operational requirements


Airfield Details

Customs

Yes

JET A-1 fuel

Yes

Immigration

Yes

AVGAS 100

Yes

Terminal Building

Yes

Single Point Refueling

Yes

Passenger Terminal

Yes

Air Starter Units

Yes

Cargo terminal

No

Ground Power (mobile)

Yes

Pax transport to airfield

No

Crash Crew

Yes

Control Tower

Yes

Aircraft Support Services

Yes

Weather Facilities

Yes

Latrine Servicing

Yes

Catering Services

No

Fire Fighting

Yes

Base Operating Room

No

Fire Fighting Category (ICAO)

Category: VII

Airport Radar

No

Fire Fighting Equipment

Yes

NDB

Yes 

De-icing Equipment

No

VOR

Yes

IFR Procedures

Yes

ILS

Yes

Runway Lights

Yes

Approach Lights

Yes 

Parking Ramp Lighting

Yes

 

Other information for passengers

First Aid

For sick or injured passengers first aid crews from CAAB provide free of cost treatment during watch hours.

Banking System

Banking facility for foreign currency exchange booth is available in the international terminal building.

Duty Free Shop

Private and Bangladesh Parjatan Corporation are operating duty free shop for the passenger(s).

Hotel Booking

Hotel booking booth is available for the passenger(s) for hotel booking.

Pure Drinking Water

Pure drinking water is available for the passenger(s).

Prayer Room

Prayer room is available for the passenger(s)

CCTV Camera

Close circuit camera for the security of the passenger (s).

Wi-Fi

Free Wi-Fi is available for the passenger(s).

FIDS

Flight Information Display System is available for the passenger/visitor to know the arrival and departure time of the flights

Luggage Wrapping

Luggage wrapping facility is available for the passengers to pack their luggage.

 

Helicopter Pad

The Airport is also used by military aircraft for their normal operations and training purpose. They use Also helicopters beside other aircraft. In time of emergency this airport can very well be used for any types of helicopters. There is enough facilities for operating number of helicopters in any emergency situation.

 

Airport Performance (last 5 years)

Year

Cargo Handled (MT)

Aircraft Movements (000)

Passenger Handled (in Lac)

Export

Import

Domestic

International

2018

2281.72

5636.35

14238

7754

16.93

2017

2991.35

3270.22

13523

8034

15.27

2016

3741.13

2439.71

14599

6736

12.51

2015

2652.07

10,680.24

12557

6677

11.71

2014

1553.29

13,760.75

10999

6087

10.66

 

Disaster Scenarios at the Airport

Cyclones

  • Occur annually but with various strength.
  • In 1991 a cat 5 cyclone struck Chattogram resulting in 138,000 deaths and $1.7BN of damage.
  • Airport infrastructure is modern and built from heavy set concrete. Risk of damage to glass fittings, parked aircraft, NAV AIDS failure, warehouse flooding and extensive debris on runway.

Earthquakes

  • Occur frequently but very rarely about 5.0 on the Richter scale.
  • Large earthquake struck Chattogram in 1997 with 6.1 magnitude with 23 deaths.
  • Potential damage to runway / apron surfaces may occur due to severe earthquakes. No tall buildings in the area except ATC tower (approx 90ft).

Flooding

  • Rare event in Chattogram however the area is prone to occasional flooding due to low elevation and proximity to the sea / rivers.
  • In 1991 and 2007 a serious flood hit the northern part of Bangladesh but the Chattogram area was badly affected.
  • Flooding could potentially submerge the runway due to low elevation (12 ft)

 

Airport Customs

  • There is a good setup of Customs authority to take care of the Export/Import formalities through this airport.
  • They are fully automated with their universal ASYCUDA World.
  • Waivers can / will be issued by the central government via NDMA.
  • Large customs area exists within the terminal building.
  • Customs officers available 24 hours.
  • Sufficient customs staff available for 24 hour operations, however, additional customs staff can be drafted in from the nearby port authority.
  • The customs process and policies are under the jurisdiction of the Board of Revenue, not the Civil Aviation Authority.

Contact: Assistant Commissioner of Customs, Tel: +88 31 800 423

 

Immigration

  • Immigration officers available 24 hours a day.
  • An emergency immigration procedure exists in the national disaster plan which allows for speedy processing of foreign aid workers. This plan will be enforced at the request of the NDMA.
  • Sufficient immigration officials are present to perform 24 hour operations, however, if required, additional immigration staff can be drafted from the nearby port authority.

Contacts: Assistant Police Commissioner (Immigration), Phone: +88 171 337 3272

 

Cargo Handling Procedure and Storage Facilities

Cargo Handling

Biman Bangladesh Airlines is the authorised and responsible agent for handling all Cargo in regard to SAIA. As the airport is not hanlding huge cargo at the moment their arrangements for such operation is also at medium scale. Some times some private operators are also authorised and issued licence by CAAB to operate the cargo and other GSE matters in specific cases. How ever for conducting the present operations smoothly BB has following GSE equipment is place.


GSE Equipment

Equipment Type Qty
Towing Tractor 08
Push Cart 02
Start Cart 02
Ground Power Unit 03
Container Pallet Loader (Can’t load at height of Double Decker) 03
Flash Cart 02
Water Cart 02
AC Van (unserviceable) 01
Passenger Step 04
Forklift 02
Belt Loader 05
Ramp Coach 02
Catering High Loader 01
Tow Bar 05
Forklift 01

 

Storage Facilities

Warehouse: Though there is no Cargo Village as such like Hazrat Shahjalal International Airport, but this airport has workable facilities. They have 2 warehouses connected to the aircraft apron by tarmac road. One concrete floor space of 2700 m² capable of accommodating 100 MT of freight which is divided into 9 caged areas of various sizes. All scanned cargo is stored in this warehouse from where cargo is delivered on completion of all necessary formalities. The newly built cargo shed is of approx. 3000 m2 capable of accommodating 150 MT freight. This shed is still underutilized. Cargo received from Aircraft are stored here primarily and later shifted to the delivery warehouse for necessary checking and completion of formalities. Landside loading / offloading area providing capacity to park 36 trucks simultaneously.

Cargo operations are owned and controlled by Bangladesh Biman. May be mentioned that Catering facility is available within the landside truck parking area.

Cold Chain: Two large cold storage rooms (12’x10’ and 12’x11’) are in operation which can be accessed from the inside of the warehouse. They maintain temperature between -40 to 100 C to be used as Cold chain for preserving medicine and special items.

Airside loading area, partially covered, providing capability to load / offload 12 trucks simultaneously.


Temporary Warehousing Arrangements

  • Though 2 Permanent Cargo warehouse are available, but in time of crisis there is ample opportunity to make temporary arrangements for storing cargo at the airport premise and nearby places.
  • The GSE storage and maintenance facility could be made available within 1-2hours for storage and breakdown of air cargo. Approximate size is 800m² hard covered area plus an additional 1600m² of open concrete hard standing. GSE area is accessible by one airside / landside gate and tarmac road to apron.
  • A large Red Cross warehouse is available within 1km of the airport facility and can be utilized during disaster relief operations.
  • A large factory warehouse is available within 1km of the airport facility and can be utilized during disaster relief operations.
  • Warehousing options exists at both the BAF and Naval military installations within 2km of the airport (BAF located on airport site).
  • Lot of open space available on the eitherside of warehouses which can be used for cargo storage errecting temporary sheds (open concrete space, usually used for truck operations).
  • Office space is available within the GSE building to facilitate distribution administration activity.
Despite Ltd warehouse capacity on the airport site, a number of larger warehousing options exist close to the airport facility. This gives Chattogram airport greater flexibility in terms of cargo accommodation and relief aid distribution.

 

Development Projects

Future Development Works:

  • Construction of parallel taxiway
  • Extension of existing runway.
  • Construction of two Boarding Bridge
  • Construction of Cargo Warehouse.

 

Fuelling Arrangements

Padma Oil Company under the supervision of Bangladesh Petroleum Corporation (BPC) is solely responsible for providing fuel to all kinds of Aircraft at Shah Aamanat International Airport. Arrangements are there to support a full fledget International Airport. The depot is co-located within Half a Km of the airport. Few salient features of this Aviation fuel provider are below:

Sl

Description

Arrangement

1

Type of Fuel

Jet A1 and Avgas

2

Tanks with Capacity

3 Tanks (each 4,22,500 Ltr capacity)

3

Requisition for Fuel

Written requisition with Payment be placed in advance, if prior contaract is not signed.

4

Hydrant lines

The whole airport area is covered under the fuel Hydrant network. At present points are being used and 10 new Hydrant points are being installed.

5

Fueling arrangement

Normally Fueling is done by following refuellers:

  • 3X Dispenser
  • 1X Refueller-19,000 ltrs
  • 1X Refueller- 18,500 ltrs
  • 1X Refueller- 18,000 Ltrs
  • 6x Tank lorry (each 20,000 Ltrs capacity)

6

Filters

Total-6 (2 for receiving, 2 for Loading and 2 for Hydrants)

7

Consumption/Capacity

Daily approx 210-215 MT/ Capacity 5 Lac Ltrs daily

8

Price of Jet A1

BDT 75/00 and $ 0.72 per ltr

9

AVGAS

Normally 30-35 Barrels are kept in reserve against monthly consumption of 15-20 Barrels Monthly

10

Manpower

Manager-1, Asst Manager-2, Officers-5, Other staff-19, Casual-12, Ansar-6

Contact Details

Depot Manager Cell: 01777703403 & Duty Officer Cell: 01777703309

 

Security Arrangements

  • A large security presence exists on the airport with a significant number of airport security personnel.
  • Security personnel are under the control of the airport manager.
  • A dedicated police station exists within 1km of the airport.
  • All access points are guarded by security personnel.
  • Due to proximity of BAF military instillation, a large military presence can be drafted in to support policing if required.
  • Temporary passes can be issued to airside workers within 30 minutes upon the directive of the NDMA.
  • X-Ray screening for both passengers and cargo is in use.

Contact: Airport Security Officer, Phone: +88 312 500 941 ext. 212 / 270


For information on Bangladesh Shah Amanat International Airport contact details, please see the following link: 

4.5 Bangladesh Airport Contact List

Information on some aviation service providers can be found at: AZ Freight information on Bangladesh

Bangladesh - 2.2.1 Bangladesh Hazrat Shahjalal Dhaka InternationalAirport (HSIA)

Introduction of HSIA

Hazrat Shahjalal International Airport is located in Dhaka City and offers good facilities to passengers as well as cargo traffic. The arrival section of the terminal is situated on the ground floor and the departure section on the first floor.

The airport has a separate domestic terminal, which is located adjacent to the international terminal. The airport has a separate cargo terminal named as the “Cargo Village”, managed by Bangladesh Biman. The airport has good access from the city with wide and well-maintained roads. The surrounding area of the airport was marshy till a few years back. The area has since being filled with sand and level has been made even with the runaway of the airport. At present various development and extension works are going on to improve the capacity and facilities of the largest airport of the country. It is being managed by the Director of the Airport alongwith his expert and experienced team members. For furthur details please go through the link:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shahjalal_International_Airport


Airport Contact:

Name: Group Captain, Abu Sayeed Mehboob Khan, psc

Address: Civil Aviation Authority of Bangladesh, Kurmitola, Dhaka-1229.

Desig: Director, Hazrat Shahjalal International Airport

Email: dhsia@caab.gov.bd

Phone: +880 2 8901449

Fax (office): +880 2 8901450
AFTN : VGHSYDYX


General Information of HSIA

Airport Location Details 

Location Details

Country

Bangladesh

Latitude

235034N, Centre of the runway

Province / District

Dhaka

Longitude

0902402E, Centre of the runway

Town or City (closest)

Dhaka (Northern part)

Elevation

Elevation: 27ft (8m)

Airfield Name

Hazrat Shahjalal International Airport

International airport

Yes

IATA & ICAO codes

DAC / VGZR

Open from/to (hours)

Administration 0900 LT to 1700 LT

Operational Services H24

 

Geographical and Administration Data 

1.

ARP* coordinates and site at AD*

235034N, 0902402E; Centre of the runway

2.

Distance and direction from city

11 NM (20 km) north of Dhaka City (GPO)

3.

AD elevation/reference temperature

Elev: 27ft (8m) / T: 35decreeC (April)

4.

Magnetic variation

55' West in 1967 (Annual change negligible)

6.

Type of traffic permitted

IFR/VFR

* ARP: Aerodrome Reference Point; AD: Aerodrome; APM: Airport Manager


Airfield Infrastructure Details

Customs

Yes

JET A-1 fuel

Yes

Airport Radar

Yes

Immigration

Yes

AVGAS 100

Yes

NDB

Yes

Terminal Building

Yes 

Single Point Refueling

Yes

VOR

Yes

Passenger Terminal

Yes 

Air Starter Units

Yes

ILS

Yes

Cargo terminal

Yes

Ground Power (mobile)

Yes

Approach Lights

Yes

Pax transport to airfield

Yes

Crash Crew

Yes

Fire Fighting Equipment

Yes

Control Tower

Yes

Aircraft Support Services

Yes

De-icing Equipment

No

Weather Facilities

Yes

Latrine Servicing

Yes

IFR Procedures

Yes

Catering Services

Yes 

Fire Fighting

Yes

Runway Lights

Yes

Base Operating Room

Yes

Fire Fighting Category (ICAO)

Category: VIII

Parking Ramp Lighting

Yes 

 

Runway Details

At present there is only one Runway in this Airport. Due to constant increase in air traffic the authority is planning to have a 2nd runway for HSIA. Meanwhile feasibility studies are also being carried out. Following are the details of the existing runway.

ID

Dimensions

Surface

Strength (PCN)

ILS

14/32

(CAT-1ILS)

10500 x 150 feet

3200 x 46 meters

ASPHALT CONCRETE

116/F/C/W/T

YES

 

Helicopter Pad(s)

For emergency operations, Bangladeshi Defense Forces use a lot of helicopters from HSIA also. The operational base for these movements is generally Tejgaon Military Airport, +/- 10 KM from DAC. Few of the Private Helicopters operate from the adjacent part of this Airport. They have their own hangers for these helicopters. In time of crisis Military Helicopters also use this portion of airport. List of the Helicopter Operating Companies along with their fleet size is shown at Art No 4.9 Page 491


Airport Performance

Performance

Annual Figures

Monthly

Daily

Total aircraft movements

87,000 (Total landing and Taking off)

7250

242

Total passengers

8.4 M

7,00.000

23333

Total Cargo handled (Year 2017-2018)

3,66,019 MT (Export and Import)

30502 MT

1017

Total capacity of the airport (MT) daily

150 MT

n/a

n/a

Current activity of the airport (MT) daily

100 MT

n/a

n/a

Current use by Humanitarian flights (UNHAS)

As and when required depending on the situation

 

Airport Operating Details

Max size aircraft that can be offloaded on bulk cargo

Boeing 747 (100MT Cargo)/ AN-124/ Boeing 777

Max size cargo aircraft that can be offloaded on pallet

Boeing 747 (100MT Cargo)/ AN-124/ Boeing 777

Total Parking Area

99,000 m²

Storage Area

27,800 m²

Cargo Handling Equipment

Yes

Elevators / Hi-loaders

Yes

Can Hi-loader/Elevators reach the upper deck of B747/777?

Yes

Loading Ramps

Yes

 

Terminal Facilities

The terminal facilities of HSIA contain 1 floor domestic passenger terminal building, 3 floors international passenger terminal building, 1 floor domestic/international cargo terminal building, VVIP terminal building, infrastructure supply facility, management/office building. Related facilities are independent in the terminal area. There are 2 terminals i.e. terminal 1 and terminal 2 for the international passengers which are connected. These 2 terminals share same departure lobby and departure gates. The existing international passenger terminal 1 and terminal 2 which are in the same building with floor area of 73,400 m2 and Domestic Passenger Terminal 2,200 m2. Soon construction of the 3rd terminal will start under the consultancy of JAICA at the cost of BDT 136.10 billion, which is expected to be completed by 2022. Apart from a 226,000-square meter terminal building, a new cargo village, VVIP complex, and rapid exit, connecting taxiways and an oil depot will be constructed under the project. After construction of the third terminal, passenger handling capacity will increase to 20 million and cargo handling capacity to 500,000, according to the CAAB.


Other Operational Details

Rescue and Fire Fighting Services

1.

AD category for firefighting:

Required category VIII, available category VIII. Facilities available for foaming runway.

2.

Rescue equipment available:

To meet ICAO requirement for category VIII.

3.

Disable aircraft removal:


Description

Number / Set

i) Platform

4 nos. Capacity 50 ton each.

ii) Matbro truck

2 nos. Capacity 3 tons each.

iii) Engine air compressor (150 PSI)

4 tons.

iv)Air distribution

8 set each containing 12 units.
8 set each containing 11 bags.

v) Pneumatic elevator

Capacity 50 tons each set.

vi) Valise (body stamp)

4 nos.

vii) Centrifugal fan

1 no.

viii) Tethering

Required nos.

Note:

1)

Serviceability of the items to be checked up before use.

2)

Charges for use of salvage equipment will be fixed on the extant of use of the various equipment.

4.

Remarks

N/A

Seasonal Availability Clearing

The airport is available for all seasons. Side strips become unusable during monsoon. There is no requirement for clearing.

Aprons, Taxiways and Check Location Data

1.

Apron surface and strength

Surface : Concrete.
Strength : PCN50/R/B/W/T.

2.

Taxiway width, surface and strength

Width : 23 m.
Surface: Concrete.
Strength : PCN50/R/B/W/T.

3.

ACL Location

Not designated

4.

INS checkpoints

Nil

5.

Remarks

Nil

Surface Movement Guidance, Control System and Markings

Use of aircraft stand ID signs, TWY guidelines and visual docking/ parking guidance system of aircraft stands

Taxiing guidance signs at all intersections with TWY and RWY at all holding positions,
Guidelines at apron,
Nose-in guidance at airport stands.

RWY and TWY markings and LGT

RWY: 14/32.
EDGE LGT: white, omni-directional with intensity 3%, 10%, 30%, 80% and 100%.
THR LGT: green, supplemented by green wing-bar.
END LGT: red
TWY: blue edge lights for all taxiways.
RWY marking aids: THR, TDZ, Centre Line, Fixed Distance, Side Stripe, RWY designator - all runways

Stop Bars

N/A

Aerodrome Obstacles

In approach/Take-off areas

In circling area and at aerodrome

Consult AOC type-A,  HSIA, Page VGHS AS 2-16

Obstruction in the circling area are shown on the instrument approach chart and page VGHS AD 2-11

Meteorological Information Provided

1.

Associated Met office

HSIA (VGHS)

2.

Hours of service

H24

3.

Office responsible for TAF preparation and Periods of validity

HSIA (VGHS); 6,12

4.

Type of landing forecast Interval of issuance

TREND

5.

Briefing/consultation provide

P, D, T

6.

Flight documentation and Languages used

C, PL; English

7.

Charts and other information available for briefing or consultation

S,U

8.

Supplementary equipment available for providing information

WXR

9.

ATS units provided with information

Dhaka ACC/FIC; APP; TWR

10.

Additional information

Tel: 880-2-8914543 (Met office)

Runway Physical Characteristics

Designator RWY NR

True & MAG BRG

Dimensions of RWY (m)

Strength (PCN) and surface of RWY & SWY

THR coordinates

THR ELEV and highest ELEV of TDZ of PAR

Slope of RWY-SWY

14

144 deg True

3200x46

59/F/B/W/T
Asphalt concrete

235118.11N
902318.62E

27

nil

32

324 deg True

3200x46

59/F/B/W/T
Asphalt concrete

234954.00N
902425.40E

27

nil

Designator RWY NR

SWY dimensions (m)

CWY dimensions (m)

Strip dimensions (m)

OFZ

Remarks

14

275x46

275x153

3750x153

Within the CWY.

25 ft (8 m) brick soling with bitumen carpeting shoulder at both side of RWY.

32

275x46

275x153

3750x153

Declared Distances

RWY

TORA (m)

TODA (m)

ASDA (m)

LDA (m)

Remarks

14

3200

3475

3475

3200

N/A

32

3200

3475

3475

3200

N/A

RWY:Runway; TORA:Take-off run available; TODA:Take-off distance available;
ASDA:Accelerate-stop distance available; LDA: Landing distance available

Approach and runway lighting

RWY designator

APCH LGT type
LEN INTST

THR LGT color WBAR

VASIS (MEHT) PAPI

TDZ LGT LEN

RWY centre line LGT

RWY edge LGT LEN, spacing, color INTST

RWY end LGT color WBAR

SWY LGT

Rem

14

Precision approach CAT-I lighting system

Simple approach lighting system and sequenced flashing lights

Supplementary approach

Green supple-mented by green Wingbar

PAPI 3 deg
MEHT
on slope
67 ft

available

available

60 m apart white omni-directional with intensity 3%, 10%, 30%, 80%, 100%

Red unidirectional

Green omnidirectional

available

nil

32

Simple approach lighting system

Green supple-mented by green Wingbar

PAPI 3 deg
MEHT
on slope
67 ft

available

available

60 m apart white omni-directional with intensity 3%, 10%, 30%, 80%, 100%

Red unidirectional

Green omnidirectional

available

nil

Other Lighting, Secondary Power Supply

1.

ABN/IBN location, characteristics and hours of operation

ABN: 235057.20N 0902413.24E Over Control TWR)
Altn FLG W G EV 5 Sec (Hours: HN and VIS<3NM) W500 G75

2.

LDI location and LGT
Anemometer location and LGT

Nil
Cup anemometer over Control TWR, windsocks end of RWY 14/32 and int he middle of RWY

3.

TWY edge and centre line lighting

Edge: Blue edge lgts for all TWYs
Centre Line: Nil

4.

Secondary Power Supply/ Switchover time

During main power supply failure, Automatic standby generator power supply available for Apch, RWY, TWY and Apron lighting within 15 seconds

5.

Remarks

APRON LIGTHS: High Intensity Flood Lights

ATS Airspace

Designation

Dhaka Control Zone

1.

Lateral limits

A circle of 25 NM radius central on Dhaka VOR (234928.86N 0902445.36E) except that portion which falls north of the strait line joining points 241147N 0903550E and 241147N 0901350E

2.

Vertical limits

GND to FL055

3.

Airspace

C

4.

ATS unit call sign/ Language

Dhaka Tower/ English

5.

Transition altitude

4000 ft MSL

6.

Remarks

Nil

Designation

Aerodrome Traffic Zone (ATZ)

1.

Lateral limits

ATZ is oval shaped area joining outer tangents of 5 NM (9 km) radius circles centered at the runway centre and both ends of runway

2.

Vertical limits

4000 ft

3.

Airspace

C

4.

ATS unit call sign/ Language

Dhaka Tower/ English

5.

Transition altitude

4000 ft MSL

6.

Remarks

Nil

ATS Communication Facilities

Service designator

Call sign

Frequency

Hours of operation

Remarks

Area Control (ACC)

Dhaka Tower

125.7 MHz

H24

Emergency frequency 121.5 MHz

TWR (Aerodrome and Approach Control, Non-Radar)

Dhaka Tower

118.3 MHz

H24

EM: A3

APP (Radar/Non-Radar)

Dhaka Approach

121.3 MHz

0130-1400 daily except Saturday; 0800-1400 on Saturday

Emergency frequency 121.5 MHz.

Radar

Dhaka Radar

126.7 MHz

HO

Only monitoring service is provided on request.

SMC

Dhaka Ground

121.8 MHz

H24

N/A

Air-Ground

Dhaka Radio

3491, 6556, 10066, 2947 kHz

H24

MWARA (3491, 6556, 10066 kHz)
RDARA (2947 kHz)
EM: A3; Coordinate:
235057.20N 0902413.24E

ATIS

Dhaka Information

127.4 MHz

H24

N/A

Note: During OJT (on the job training) in TWR, APP (Non-Radar), ACC or Radar Approach Control Service at HSIA will be Ltd. However, Radar Approach Control Service may be available during OJT on request.

Radio Navigation and Landing Aids

Type

Ident

Freq

OpHr

Coordinates

Remarks

DVOR

DAC

112.7 MHz

H24

234928.86N
0902445.36E

144 deg MAG, 958m FM THR RWY 32, EM:A2

DME


1161 MHz

H24

234928.86N
0902445.36E

Collocated with DVOR, Elev of Antenna 49ft AMSL, EM:P9

NDB

DCN

298 kHz

H24

235034.32N
0902503.67E

046 deg MAG, 1795m fm THR RWY32, EM:A2

ILS/LLZ

IDA

109.5 MHz

H24

234940.04N
0902436.49E

144 deg MAG, 550m FM THR RWY 32, EM:A2

ILS/GP


332.6 MHz

H24

235112.67N
0902328.62E

Slope: 3 deg, 130 m off-set East, 300 m inward fm RWY 14, RDH 51.57 ft, EM:A3

MM


75 MHz

H24

235145.75N
0902256.66E

324 deg MAG, 1050m FM THR RWY 14, EM:A2

OM

DA

75 MHz

H24

235557.71N
0901937.12E

324 deg MAG, 5.8NM FM THR RWY 14, EM:A2

OL


375 kHz

H24

235558.39N
0901936.52E

324 deg MAG, 5.8NM FM THR RWY 14, EM:A2

 

Bird Concentration

Bird concentrations may exist on or in the vicinity of HSIA due to low laying area around the airfield, during the period from December to May of the year. Bird shooters are posted in the maneuvering area to reduce the bird hazard. Moreover, necessary information about the location of birds, if visible, is transmitted to the pilots by Aerodrome Control Tower. However, pilots are requested to exercise caution while approaching to land and take-off.


Cargo Handling Procedure and Storage Facilities

Both inbound and outbound cargo are carefully and systematically handled by the cargo division of Bangladesh Biman. Import Terminal is used for handling inbound cargo and a separate terminal known as Cargo Village is used for exporting cargo through HISA. Sufficient Cargo handling equipment facility is being managed by GSE division of Bangladesh Biman.

Import Cargo Terminal

  1. There is a 2 storied Import Terminal and a concrete structured warehouse area with direct access to apron.
  2. Cargo operations are owned and controlled by Bangladesh Biman (National Carrier).
  3. Concrete floor space of 15,000m² area.
  4. Landside loading / offloading area provided.
  5. 2 nominal aircraft parking spots in front of building.
  6. Total warehousing area is insufficient and therefore, mostly the imported cargo remains in the open air on the concrete ground.

Export Cargo Terminal

  • The Cargo Export terminal is called Cargo Village situated on the northern side of the Airport.
  • The complex is separated from Import Cargo terminal and has direct access to apron.
  • Cargo operations are owned and controlled by Bangladesh Biman.
  • Concrete floor space of 12,800m².
  • Landside loading / offloading area provided.
  • nominal aircraft parking spots are there in front of building.

 

Handling Services and Facilities

Biman Bangladesh Airlines (BB) is given the responsibility of handling the total Cargo services including proving General Service Equipment as required. At present they have following handling equipment which seems to be in sufficient for managing cargo in time of crisis or special operation:

Sl

Description

Qty

1

Water Cart

03

2

Air Start Unit

05

3

Air Conditioning Unit

02

4

Ambulift

02

5

Belt Loader

11

6

Mobile Cranes

01

7

Container Pallet Loaders

13

8

Catering Hi-Lift

06

9

Container Pallet Transporters

08

10

Delivery Van

01

11

Flush Cart

02

12

Fork Lift

07

13

Fuel Brouser

01

14

Ground Power Unit

18

15

Narrow Asle Stacker

11

16

Push Back Tow Tractor

07

17

Passenger Steps

08

18

Ramp Coach

07

19

Tow Tractor Baggage

37

Total

150


Ground Handling Agency

Biman provides ground handling facilities to all airports in Bangladesh and is approved by the Civil Aviation of Bangladesh, as the sole ground handler to all foreign carriers’ flights operating on commercial basis. It has sufficient ground handling equipment and experienced manpower to handle all type of aircraft.

All schedule/non-schedule operators may contact with the following address to get the latest information related to ground handling at any Bangladeshi airport:


List of Officers - Biman Bangladesh Airlines

Name Designation Phone Mobile Email
Capt. Farhat Hassan Jamil

Managing Director & CEO

+88-02-8901700

01777715501

mdbiman@bdbiman.com

Ziauddin Ahmed

Director, Administration

+88-02-8901701

01777715506

dabiman@bdbiman.com

Kazi Atiqur Rahman

Company Secretary

02-8901383

01777715510

csbiman@bdbiman.com

Nurul Islam Howlader

GM, Airport Services

+88-02-8901550

01777715531

gmaps@bdbiman.com

Md. Atique Sobhan

General Manager, Customer Services

+88-02-8901770

01777715532

gmcs@bdbiman.com

Shahnoor Ahmad

DGM, Ground Service

+88-02-8901303


dgmgs@bdbiman.com

Md. Rashedul Karim

General Manager, Ground Support Equipment

+ 88-02-8901২93

01777715552

gmgse@bdbiman.com

Md Shamsul Karim

DGM, Transport Department

+88-02-8901532

01777715550

dgmmt@bdbiman.com


Cargo Import Export Procedure

Import Procedure 

  1. Cargo received from Aircraft (along with Air Waybill and Cargo manifest).
  2. Then they are segregated, sorted and stored at the warehouse by Ground Cargo Handler (BB)
  3. As per AWB the Consignee is informed/ Consignee goes to Cargo office.
  4. Consignee/ their authorized C&F agent collects AWB and goes to Customs authority
  5. Customs puts a Rotation Number, Examine the goods for Tax/Waiver/unauthorized goods etc.
  6. Upon examination Customs authority provides clearance to release Goods.
  7. At the cargo yard (Import) after payment of the Handling charges or Storage charges (if any) the goods are delivered to the agent.
  8. The C& F agent will make transportation arrangements beyond airport.

Export Procedure

  1. Exportable Cargo to be delivered to the Cargo Village of BB along with following:
    1. Cargo well packed and marked with Labels
    2. Invoice
    3. Packing List
    4. Customs Clearance Certificate for export (Ex BOE)
    5. Gate Pass mentioning the AWB number.
  2. Cargo received at the Acceptance area by BB where items will be measured and AWB will be prepared.
  3. FF agent will then send all documents to Customs for final clearance and payments etc.
  4. On receiving final clearance from Customs cargo will be Scanned by Duel view scanning machine (total having 6) and for EU countries by EDS machine (total having 2).

Once cargo is checked, it is sent to Loading area for Export.

 

Airport Charges and Fees (As of 2019)

The charges set out are common to all Civil Aviation Authority administered aerodromes except where the contrary is stated.

Unless an alternative arrangement has been made, all charges for use of aerodromes are payable by the pilot of the aircraft on demand or before the aircraft departs from the aerodrome.

Fees shall be paid to the Chairman, Civil Aviation Authority and if not so paid shall be a debt due to Government of Bangladesh from the owner and the Commander of the aircraft in respect of which the fees are payable.

For the purpose of enforcing payment of fees, the Chairman, Civil Aviation Authority may refuse to permit and aircraft to take off from an aerodrome until all fees have been paid.

No abatement of any fees shall be allowed in the event of any aerodrome service, assistance or other facility being not available and except as provided in these Regulations no exemption or remission shall be granted.


Exemption

Landing Charges, Parking and Housing Charges, Boarding Bridge Fees, Security Charges, Charges for flights beyond hours of operation and Route Navigation Charges shall not be applicable in the following cases, namely:

  • An aircraft belonging to the United Nations Organization or any of its agencies or International Red Cross engaged in medical relief for humanitarian mission
  • An aircraft engaged on non-remunerative basis in search and rescue operations or medical relief or humanitarian mission
  • Any aircraft engaged in air calibration work;
  • An aircraft belonging to Flying Clubs approved by CAAB engaged in training purpose;
  • State aircraft of Bangladesh;
  • Such aircraft as the Government may deem fit to exempt.


Navigation Charges (US$)

MTOW (Maximum Take-Off Weight) in the Certificate of Airworthiness

International flight

Domestic flight

Not exceeding 2,000 kg

BDT equivalent of USD 12

BDT 75

Over 2,000 kg but not exceeding 5,000 kg

BDT equivalent of USD 24

BDT 150

Over 5,000 kg but not exceeding 10,000 kg

BDT equivalent of USD 30

BDT 225

Over 10,000 kg but not exceeding 20,000 kg

BDT equivalent of USD 75

BDT 450

Over 20,000 kg but not exceeding 50,000 kg

BDT equivalent of USD 150

BDT 900

Over 50,000 kg but not exceeding 100,000 kg

BDT equivalent of USD 300

BDT 1800

Over 100,000 kg but not exceeding 200,000 kg

BDT equivalent of USD 420

BDT 3000

Over 200,000 kg

BDT equivalent of USD 450

BDT 3750

 

Landing Charge

Basis: MTOW (Maximum Take-Off Weight) in the CoA (Certificate of Airworthiness).

The charges for landing an aircraft at Government Airports / Aerodromes are as follow:

Total weight of the Aircraft as provided in the certificate of airworthiness

Single Landing charges

(Calculated nearest 1000 kg.)

International flights

Domestic flights

Not exceeding 10,000 kg

Such amount of BDT as is equivalent to US$ 5.25 per 1000 kg.

BDT 53 per 1000 kg.

Over 10,000 kg. but not exceeding  20,000 kg

Such amount of BDT as is equivalent to US$ 6.75 per 1000 kg.

BDT 68 per 1000 kg

Over 20,000 kg. but not exceeding 50,000 kg.

Such amount of BDT as is equivalent to US$ 7.5 per 1000 kg.

BDT 83 per 1000 kg

Over 50,000 kg. but not exceeding  1,00,000 kg

Such amount of BDT as is equivalent to US $9.75 per 1000 kg.

BDT 150 per 1000 kg.

Over 1,00,000 kg. but not exceeding  3,00,000 kg

Such amount of BDT as is equivalent to US $12 per 1000 kg

BDT 188 per 1000 kg.

Over 3,00,000 kg

Such amount of BDT as is equivalent to US $ 12.75 per 1000 kg

BDT 315 per 1000 kg.

  • The charges may also be paid in US Dollars.
  • 10% extra charge for each landing or take-off after sunset and before sunrise.
  • Only 50% of the landing charges, in case the aircraft is engaged in training purpose.
  • In case an aircraft is engaged in test flight only, with the approval of the Airport Manager, only 25% of the landing fees will be charged.


Parking and Housing Charges

  • Parking charges for each 24 hours period or part thereof: 25% of the landing charges when the parking period exceeds 6 hours;
  • Hangar charges for each 24 hours period or part thereof: 50% of the parking charges;
  • Monthly charges for both parking and hangar: 20 times the 24 hours parking / hangar charge
  • Quarterly charges for both parking and hangar: 50 times the 24 hours parking / hangar charge
  • Without written approval the Chairman CAAB, no aircraft shall be allowed to stay on the apron for more than 3 months.


Boarding Bridges Fees

  • Hourly rates for using the Boarding Bridge:

Rate for the first two hours (on hourly basis)

All up weight of aircraft (kg)

Charge (US$)

Below 100,000

100

From 100,000 to below 200,000

150

From 200,000 to below 300,000

200

300,000 and above

250


  • Basic Boarding Bridge charges as mentioned above are applicable for the first two hours only.
  • If an aircraft uses Boarding Bridges for more than two hours, the rate for each additional half-an-hour, or part thereof, shall be as follows:

All up weight of aircraft (kg)

Charge (US$)

Below 100,000

60

From 100,000 to below 200,000

75

From 200,000 to below 300,000

90

300,000 and above

125

 

Discount in additional charges at Hazrat Shahjalal International Airport

  • If the period of the additional use of the Boarding Bridge the Airport is not in conceding with the busy hours of operation, the applicable rates shall be only 50% of the rates mentioned above.
  • The right definition of the hours of operation at the airport as busy or non-busy lies with the Civil Aviation Authority. The timing will be circulated to the operators at the time of approving the schedule and may be amended from time to time.
  • The period of use of Boarding Bridge shall be reckoned from the time an aircraft docks in, to the time the aircraft starts pushing back.
  • Discount for frequent users
  • Discount Charge for the frequent users of Boarding Bridges shall be as follows:

Hours used weekly

Rate

61 to 90 hours

5%

91 to 120 hours

7.5%

121 hours and above

10%

Note: The hours mentioned above are cumulative.


Charges for flight Beyond Hours of Operation

The charges for utilizing airport or aerodrome facilities and air route navigation facilities for flights operating beyond hours of operation:

For use of airport or aerodrome facilities

 

International Flights

The amount of BDT equivalent to US $ 225 per hour or part thereof.

Domestic Flights

BDT 4500 per hour or part thereof.

For use of air route navigation facilities


The amount of BDT equivalent to US $ 90 per hour or part thereof.


Cargo Terminal Charges

Import

Rate US$/kg

Import storage charge

03 days free

Cargo and Mail Handling Charge for skd

0.07 US$ per Kg

Cargo and Mail Handling Charge for non skd

0.10 US$ per Kg

Dangerous goods handling fee for import

US$ 100

Live animal handling fee for import

10 US$ per AWB

Forklifts charge for import

3 BDT per Kg

Cool room storage charges

1-7 days: BDT 50 per unit of 50 Kg

8-14 days: BDT 100 per unit of 50 Kg

14 + days: BDT 600 per unit of 50 Kg

Strong room storage charges (3 days free)

03-13 days 50 BDT/ Unit (Per Unit 50 kg)

13-21 days 200 BDT/ Unit (Per Unit 50 kg)

21+ days 600 BDT/ Unit (Per Unit 50 kg)

Import handling fee

5 BDT/ kg

Export

Charges

Security escorting charges for VAL cargo (on request)

US $ 100

Export Storage Charge

30 hours free

Terminal handling charges

0.08 US$/Kg

Cargo and Mail Handling charge for skd

0.08 US$/Kg

Cargo and mail handling charge for non skd

0.10 US$/Kg

Security Scanning Charge (CAAB)

0.06 US$/Kg

Reweighing charge for export (On request)

US$ 10 per AWB

Dangerous goods handling fee for export

US$ 100

Live animal handling fee for export

10 US$ per AWB

Forklift charge for export

BD BDT 3/ Kg

Full airways bill data transmission (FWB)

5 US$ per AWB

House airway bill data transmission (FHL)

5 US$ per AWB

RA3 handling charge for export

0.02 US$ Kg

 

Charges for Passenger Boarding Bridge (PBB)/ Air-bridge / Sky Bridge/ Jet Bridge

  • Hourly rates for using Boarding Bridge at all airports or aerodromes of Bangladesh shall be as follows:

All up weight of the aircraft (kg.)

Charges (US$)

Below 100,000

100

From 100,000 to below 200,000

150

From 200,000 to below 300,000

200

300,000 and over

250


  • Basic boarding bridge charges as mentioned in clause A shall apply for the first 2 (two) hours only.
  • If an aircraft uses Boarding Bridge for more than 2 (two) hours, the rates for each additional half-an-hour, or part of thereof, shall be as follows:


All up weight of the aircraft (kg.)

Charges (US$)

Below 100,000

60

From 100,000 to below 200,000

75

From 200,000 to below 300,000

90

300,000 and over

125


  • If the period of additional use of the Boarding Bridge at Hazrat SHahjalal International Airport is not in Busy hours of operation, the applicable rates shall be 50% of the rates mentioned in clause C.
  • The right for edclaration of the hours operation at Hazrat Shahjalal International Airport as busy or non-busy lies with the Civil Aviation Authority. The timing will be circulated to the operators at the time of approving the schedule and may be amended from time to time.
  • the period for the use of Boarding Bridge shall be reckoned from the time an aircraft docks in, to the time the aircraft starts to push back.
  • Discount Charges for the frequent users of Boarding Bridges shall be as follows:

 

Hours Used Weekly

Rates of Discount

61 - 90 Hours

5%

91 - 120 Hours

7.5%

121 Hours and above

10%

The hours mentioned above shall be cumulative.

 

Humanitarian Staging Area (HSA)

In fact, the present cargo storage facilities of the airport are insufficient, and the authority is facing tremendous problems to support the exporters and importers in their regular operations. So, it will be very difficult to handle huge influx of imported cargo in time of crisis. Considering the fact, the government of Bangladesh has decided to allocate a piece of land at Purbachal area (approx. 15 KM south-east of Airport). This will be known as “Humanitarian Staging Area” to be developed by WFP Bangladesh in collaboration with the Ministry of Disaster Management and Relief (MoDMR) which will be used by the UN and other humanitarian organizations and NGOs for managing their humanitarian cargo. The area is well connected by road and new extension of the town is going to be established there in near future. Suitable numbers of sheds and warehouses will be built in the area and cargo will be directly transported from airport to this area for sorting, storing and transporting for subsequent distributions.

 

Development Projects

Recently Completed Development Works:

  • Extension of passenger apron from foxtrot taxiway towards west and export cargo apron from northern side of the existing export cargo apron at Hazrat Shahjalal international airport, Dhaka.
  • Asphalt concrete overlay over the existing runway at Shahjalal international airport, Dhaka.
  • Upgrade of Hazrat Shahjalal international Airport, Dhaka.
  • Consultancy Services for the Up gradation of Hazrat Shahjalal International Airport, Dhaka.
  • Consultancy services for Construction of 3rd Terminal, 2nd Runways and other infrastructure Development Works at Hazrat Shahjalal International Airport, Kurmitola, Dhaka.

On Going Development Works:

  • Consultancy and delivery of services for improvement of security system at Hazrat Shahjalal international Airport, Dhaka.
  • Construction of CAAB Headquarters Complex at Hazrat Shahjalal International Airport, Kurmitola, Dhaka.
  • Extension of apron towards north of the existing export cargo apron at Hazrat Shahjalal international Airport, Dhaka (Phase-11).
  • Construction of General Aviation Hangar, Hangar Apron & Apron North side of fire station at Hazrat Shahjalal international Airport, Dhaka.
  • Construction of 3rd Terminal, at Hazrat Shahjalal International Airport, Kurmitola, Dhaka.

Future Development Works:

  • Hazrat Shahjalal International Airport, Dhaka Expansion Project.


Fuelling Arrangement at HSIA

Padma Oil Company under the supervision of Bangladesh Petroleum Corporation (BPC) is solely responsible for providing fuel to all kinds of Aircraft at HSIA. It is located at Kurmitola adjacent to the HSIA airport. Few salient features of this Aviation fuel provider are below:

Description

Arrangement

Type of Fuel

Jet A1 and AV Gas (F gas 100LL)

Tanks with Capacity

Jet A1 - 12 Tanks with total 8500 MT storage capacity.

AV Gas- approx. 600 drums (as per requirement)

Requisition for Fuel

Written requisition with Payment be placed in advance

Hydrant lines

Approx 4 KM Hydrant pipe lines are laid from depot to airport area with 21 fueling points against 29 bay.

Fueling arrangement

Fueling is done by 11 Dispenser and 7 refuelers having tank capacity of 18,000 ltrs each.

Consumption

Yearly approx. 40,000 MT (Daily avg 1,000 MT)

Price of Jet A1

BDT 75/00 and $ 0.72 per ltr

Safety

Ensured by IATA and JIG

Tech assistance

Provided by SHELL

 

Contact Details

Md Mahbubul Alam

DGM (Aviation)

Depot In-Charge

Shahjalal Service Station

Hazarat Shahjalal Int Airport, Kurmitola, Dhaka, Bangladesh

Cell No: 01777703324 
Email : padma27735@yahoo.com Web: http://www.pocl.gov.bd


Security Arrangement

A Security Director, with Chief Security Officers assisting him at various airports, heads the security function in CAAB. The Chief Security Officers at the respective airports are directly responsible for the security there. Apart from this security is also provided by the Government of Bangladesh since airports fall under sensitive installations of the country. Armed security personnel drawn from various agencies of the government are deployed at the entrances to the airports as well as on the runways and parking bays. No serious lapses in security have been reported which is an indicator that security measures at all airports in Bangladesh are quite adequate. In short the Airport is well secured with the presence of significant number of Security personnel. Few salient points are narrated:

  • A total of 2,000+ Police, Armed Police, and other Security personnel are maintaining Access Control, Immigration, Security Checks and Intelligence of the Airport.
  • Security personnel are under the control of the airport director.
  • A dedicated police station exists at the airport.
  • All access points are guarded by security personnel.
  • Due to proximity of Bangladesh Military installations, RAB and Armed Police Bn, a large number of Security Personnel’s presence can be drafted in to support policing if required.
  • X-Ray screening for both passengers and cargo is in use.
  • Contingency plans are in place.
  • No additional forces should be required following a disaster.

Security charge

The charges for security checking of embarking passengers and their hand-carried bags, wherever provided, are as follows.

International flights:

10% of the day time landing charges, minimum the amount of BDT equivalent to US $ 100 per departing aircraft.

Domestic flights:

10% of the day time landing charges, minimum 250 BDT per departing aircraft.


For information on Bangladesh Zia Dhaka International Airport contact details, please see the following link: 

4.5 Bangladesh Airport Contact List

For additional information, please see the following documents: 

Bangladesh Costs 2013 Airfield Charges

Dhaka airport additional info

Note: The information provided in the attached documents, which has been taken from the old DLCA, does not match the structure of the new LCA and is therefore provided separately.

Information on some aviation service providers can be found at: AZ Freight information on Bangladesh  

2.2.3 Bangladesh Osmani International Airport

Airport Overview

Location Details
Country Bangladesh Latitude 24.96333
Province / District Sylhet Longitude 91.86694
Town or City (Closest)

Sylhet

5 NM N of Sylhet Town

Elevation (ft and m) 50 ft / 15.24 m
Airfield Name Osmani International Airport IATA and ICAO Codes VGSY / ZYL
Open From (hours) 6:00 Open To (hours) 21:00


Sylhet is a major city in north-eastern Bangladesh. It is the main city of Sylhet Division and District and was granted metropolitan city status in March 2009. Sylhet is located on the banks of the Surma River and is surrounded by the Jaintia, Khasi and Tripura hills. The city is approaching a population of 500,000 people while also having a high population density. It is one of the largest cities in Bangladesh. The Sylhet region is well known for its tea gardens and tropical forests, the city however is currently known for its business boom – being one of the richest cities in Bangladesh, with new investments of hotels, shopping malls and luxury housing estates, brought mainly by expatriates living in the United Kingdom. The city of Sylhet is served by Osmani International Airport, located at the north of the city.

Osmani International Airport, Sylhet was built in 1944-1945, during the 2nd World War to check Japanese aggression from Burma. The airport was formerly known as Sylhet Civil Airport. The airport was initially served by domestic flights from Shahjalal International Airport by the country's national airline Biman Bangladesh Airlines Ltd. After that Sylhet Civil Airport was renamed as Osmani International Airport (OIA) in the honour of General M A G Osmani, the Chief of Liberation Forces of Bangladesh and a proud son of the soil of Sylhet division.

In 1986, the airport became a full-fledged domestic airport after the construction of terminal building, installation of navigational aids, re-construction of runway pavement, development of taxiways and aprons under the project of Sylhet Civil Airport. After many years in 1998 Ltd expansion of the airport was carried out to enable medium-sized aircraft, such as the Airbus A310. In 2002 the airport was designated an International airport by the government, and it received the first international arrival flight of Biman Bangladesh Airlines Ltd. However, the airport was not up to international standards due to shortage of equipment.After the South Asia Transport and Trade Facilitation Conference in 2006, upgradation work of terminal facilities to enable handling of international flights work was started. The improvements included construction of a new terminal building, two Jetways and a taxiway and after the completion of work Biman would operate Hajj flights directly from the airport during the Hajj season in 2007.In 2010 the decision was made to construct a refuelling station and the work began in 2012. In 2015, Fly Dubai the 1st foreign airlines operated their flight to Sylhet from Dubai. Osmani International Airport is located at 15 km north-east from Sylhet city. At present domestic and international passenger and cargo flights are operating by the national and international airlines operators to and from Osmani International Airport, Sylhet. It is one of the most clean and hygienic Airport which is well maintained regularly.


Airport Operations Manager

Custom

Handling Operations / Logistics

Airport Manager
Telephone : 880 821 714243 (off)

Cell: 01708167287
e-mail: apmsylhet@caab.gov.bd

PABX: 880821- 725391 to 94

Assistant Commissioner of Customs

Airport custom House

Tel: 0821- 717356

Biman Bangladesh Airlines:
Phone: +880 821 717026-28, +880 821 717411.
Fax: +88-0821-720491
e-mail: zyluu@bdbiman.com, zylab@bdbiman.com


General Information of OIA

Runway Details

Description

Runway 11

Runway 29

Surface

ASPHALT

ASPHALT

True Heading

113.00

293.00

Latitude

24.968336 and 24° 58' 06.01" N

24.958147 and 24° 57' 29.33" N

Longitude

91.853617 and 091° 51' 13.02" E

91.879953 and 091° 52' 47.83" E

Elevation/Slope

50.0 feet (15 meters)/0

50.0 feet (15 meters)/ 0.0°

Landing Distance

8458 feet (2578 meters)

9478 feet (2889 meters)

Take off Distance

9678 feet (2950 meters)

9478 feet (2889 meters)

Displaced Threshold Length

1020 feet (311 meters)

-

Overrun Length

200 feet (61 meters)

-

Overrun Surface

ASPHALT

ASPHALT

Lighting System

PAPI LIGHTS

PAPI LIGHTS

SWY dimensions

61x46 m

300x46 m

CWY dimensions

153 m

300 m

Strip dimensions

2952x153 m

2952x153 m

SWY surface and strength: First 80FT same as RWY, Remaining 120FT is nominal concrete.

 

Airfield details

Customs (HO)

Yes

JET A-1 fuel

Yes

Immigration (HO)

Yes

AVGAS 100

No

Terminal building

Yes

Single point refuelling

No

Passenger terminal

Yes

Starter units (press air)

Yes

Cargo terminal

No

Ground power (mobile)

Yes

Pax transport to airfield

Yes

Crash crew

Yes

Control tower

Yes 

Aircraft support services

Yes

Weather facilities

Yes 

Latrine servicing

Yes

Catering services

No

Fire fighting

Yes

Base Operating room

No

Fire fighting category (ICAO)

Category: V

Airport radar

No

Fire fighting equipment

Yes

NDB

Yes

De-icing equipment

No

VOR

Yes

IFR procedures

Yes

ILS

Yes

Runway lights

Yes

Approach lights

Yes 

Parking ramp lighting

Yes

 

Airport Data

Geographical and Administration Data

1.

ARP* coordinates and site at AD*

245740.83N, 0915217.89E; in the runway

2.

Distance and direction from city

5 NM N/NE of Town

3.

AD elevation/reference temperature

Elev: 50ft / T: 35.4 degree C

4.

Magnetic variation

50' West

5.

Type of traffic permitted

IFR/VFR

*ARP: Aerodrome Reference Point; AD: Aerodrome; APM: Airport Manager

Passenger Facilities

1.

Hotels

Available within 2 km from airport

2.

Restaurant accommodation

Ltd at the airport

3.

Transportation available

Taxis, Microbus, Car, Autorickshaws

4.

Medical Facilities

Only First Aids available

5.

Banks and Post Office

Available

6.

Tourist office

Available within 2 km from airport

Rescue and Fire Fighting Services

1.

AD category for fire fighting:

CAT 5, available 5.

2.

Rescue equipment available:

Ltd

3.

Disable Aircraft Removal

Nil

Seasonal Availability Clearing

The airport is available for all seasons. Side strips become unusable during monsoon. There is no requirement for clearing.

Aprons, Taxiways and Check Location Data

1.

Apron surface and strength

Surface : Bituminous Concrete.

Strength : PCN20/F/C/Y/T.

2.

Taxiway width, surface and strength

Width : 35 m.

Surface: Bituminous Concrete.

Strength : PCN20/F/C/Y/T.

3.

ACL Location

Not designated

 

Other Airport Data

Surface Movement Guidance, Control System and Markings

1.

Stand identification/ TWY guidelines/ visual docking/ parking guidance

Taxiing guidance signs at intersections with TWY and RWY,
Guidelines at apron,
Nose-in guidance at airport stands.

2.

RWY and TWY markings and LGT

RWY marking aids: THR, Centre Line, RWY designator - all runways.
TWY marking aids: TWY centre line.

3.

Stop Bars

N/A

Aerodrome Obstacles

In approach/Take-off areas

In circling area

Obstacles in approach/ take-off area are shown in Instrument Approach Charts

RWY affected

Obstacle type

Position

LGT

29

Jalalabad Gas Transmission Building. 150 FT (AGL)

245302.22N 0915249.08E,
4.2NM South of THR RWY29

LGT

29

Flare stack Kailastila Gas Field, 186FT(AGL)

245208.28N 0920128.02E
8.88NM from THR RWY 29

LGT

Meteorological Information Provided

1.

Associated Met office

Osmani Intl. Airport (VGSY)

2.

Hours of service

HO

3.

Office responsible for TAF preparation and Periods of validity

HSIA (VGZR); 6

4.

Briefing/consultation provided

Provided at VGZR

5.

Flight documentation and Languages used

C, PL; English

6.

ATS units provided with information

TWR

Declared Distances

RWY

TORA (m)

TODA (m)

ASDA (m)

LDA (m)

Remarks

11

2591

2744

2652

2591

N/A

29

2591

2891

2891

2591

N/A

Abbreviations:

RWY: Runway; TORA: Take-off run available; TODA: Take-off distance available;
ASDA: Accelerate-stop distance available; LDA: Landing distance available

Approach and runway lighting

RWY designator

APCH

THR

VASIS
PAPI

TDZ

RWY CL

RWY edge

END and WBAR

STWL

Rem

11

Simple approach lighting system

Six Green LGT

PAPI

N/A

N/A

60m apart, 79+4=84 lights, intensity 100%, 80%, 60%

Abvl

N/A

N/A

29

N/A

Six Green LGT

PAPI

N/A

N/A

Abvl

N/A

N/A

Other Lighting, Secondary Power Supply

1.

ABN/IBN location, characteristics and hours of operation

N/A

2.

LDI location and LGT
Anemometer location and LGT

N/A
Atop control TWR, LGT.

3.

TWY edge and centre line lighting

Edge: Available
Centre Line: Nil

4.

Secondary Power Supply/ Switchover time

During main power supply failure, Automatic standby generator power supply available within 15 seconds.

5.

Remarks

APRON LIGTHS: available

ATS Airspace

Designation

Air Traffic Zone (ATZ)

1.

Lateral limits

ATZ is oval shaped area joining outer tangents of 5 NM (9 km) radius circles centered at the runway centre and both ends of runway

2.

Vertical limits

4000 ft (AMSL)

3.

Airspace

D

4.

Unit Language

English

5.

Transition altitude

4000 ft

ATS Communication Facilities

Service designator

Call sign

Frequency

Hours of operation

Remarks

Aerodrome Control Centre

Sylhet Tower

122.9 MHz

HO*

N/A

*HO: Service available to meet operational requirements

Radio Navigation and Landing Aids

Type

Ident

Freq

OpHr

Coordinates

Remarks

DVOR

SYT

116.4 MHz

HO

245738.97N
0915201.00E

EM:A2

NDB

SY

372 kHz

HO

245719.60N
0915220.74E

EM:A0/A2

ILS/LLZ

SYL

110.5 MHz

HO

245726.53N
0915254.91E

144 deg MAG, 550m FM THR RWY 32, EM:A2

ILS/GP


332.6 MHz

HO

245800.21N
0915132.40E

Slope: 3 deg, 130 m off-set East, 300 m inward fm RWY 14, RDH 51.57 ft, EM:A3

DME


1003 MHz

HO

245800.21N
0915132.40E

Collocated with GP,
DME antenna elev: 23.24m

 

Yearly Performance

Total aircraft movements

8500-9000 movements yearly

Total passengers

Approx. 6,00,000

Current monthly use by Humanitarian flights (UNHAS)

No regular flight

 

Cargo Handling procedure and Storage Facility

At present there is no warehouse or Cargo village as such at this International Airport. Mostly all the cargo are handled manually. No Cargo Handling Equipment is available here as such except few trolley for carrying passenger luggeses. Temporary arrangement can me made for 1000 MT at the transit cargo shed. But there is no proper Cargo storage facility/warehouse as such. Mostly the flights are passenger based and their Luggages are handled by Biman Bangladesh Airlines. Biman has a shed where the Passengers left luggage are laid apart for a max period of 1/2 days. No imported Cargo or exports cargo is handled here. But in case of emergency this Bangladesh Biman shed will be used. In addition, the concrete area infront of VIP lounge is earmarked to be used as temporary cargo storage raising tripol sheds over the area of 15,000 sq ft.


Development Projects

Though it’s an international airport, lot of facilities are required to be arranged/established. Therefore following development programs have been taken in hand:

Recently Completed Development Works

  • Installation of Fire Alarm System.
  • Modernization of security equipment (Dual view scanning machine, ETD, under vehicle scanning system).

On Going Development Works

  • Construction of Security Wall.
  • Construction of Security Petrol Road
  • Installation of new ILS
  • Installation of high capacity sub-station.

Future Development Works

  • Improvement of the Runway- The Runway will be further strengthened to raise its PCN from 70 to 90.
  • 2nd Terminal - The 2nd Terminal building will be built to be used as proper international terminal.
  • Installation of 06 (six) Boarding Bridge.
  • Storage and cargo handling capacity will be increased to meet the standard requirement.
  • Land requisition for the construction of runway strip as per ICAO standard.


Fueling Arrangement at OIA

Padma Oil Company under the supervision of Bangladesh Petroleum Corporation (BPC) is solely responsible for providing fuel to all kinds of Aircraft at Osmani International Airport. Arrangements are there to support a full fledget International Airport but the present establishment and setup is not being used at the moment. The depot is located within 1 Km of the airport. Few salient features of this Aviation fuel provider are below:

Sl

Description

Arrangement

1

Type of Fuel

Jet A1

2

Tanks with Capacity

03 Tanks with total approx 12,00,000 storage capacity but non in use.

3

Requisition for Fuel

Written requisition with Payment be placed in advance.

4

Hydrant lines

Approx 1.5 KM Hydrant pipe lines are laid from depot to airport area with 6 fueling points against 4 bay (2 each for 2 bays with Boarding Bridge and One each for 2 other non-BB bays). But these are not yet in use.

5

Fueling arrangement

Normally Fueling is done by following refuellers:

a. 2X Trailers- 40,000 liters

b. 1X Refueller-20,000 liters

c.  2X Refueller- 18,500 liters

d.  1X Trailers- 30,000 liters

Total 1,08,500 liters Jet A-1 is kept as reserve for fueling and its regularly requisitioned from Dhaka.

6

Consumption

Yearly approx. 48,00,000 liters

7

Price of Jet A1

BDT 75/00 and $ 0.72 per liter

8

Manpower

Total 17 including drivers, security, mechanics, and office staff)

9

Safety

Ensured by IATA and JIG

10

Tech assistance

Provided by SHELL

Contact Details


Md Hemayet Hossain

Assistant Manger (Aviation), Depot In-Charge

Cell No: 01777703314 
Web: http://www.pocl.gov.bd

 

Security Arrangement

  • A large security presence exists on the airport with a significant number of airport security personnel.
  • Security personnel are under the control of the Airport Manager.
  • A dedicated police Camp exists within the airport premise.
  • All access points are guarded by security personnel.
  • Temporary passes can be issued to airside workers within 30 minutes upon the directive of the NDMA.
  • X-Ray screening for both passengers and cargo is in use.


For information on Bangladesh Osmani International Airport additional information, please see the following documents: 

Bangladesh Airports additional info

Bangladesh Costs 2013 Airfield Charges

Bangladesh Common Information Airport Charges

Bangladesh Osmani airport additional info

Note: The information provided in the attached documents, which has been taken from the old DLCA, does not match the structure of the new LCA and is therefore provided separately.

For information on Bangladesh Osmani International Airport contact details, please see the following link: 

4.5 Bangladesh Airport Contact List

Information on some aviation service providers can be found at: AZ Freight information on Bangladesh  

2.2.4 Bangladesh Saidpur Airport

Saidpur Airport started its journey as a domestic airport in 1979. This airport is situated on a total of 136.59 acres of land. Saidpur Airport is managed by the Civil Aviation Authority of Bangladesh. This Airport is located at 2 km from Saidpur town and 350 km from Dhaka. The only destination is Dhaka for the Passengers. 4 domestic airlines (Bangladesh Biman, Novo Air, US Bangla and Regent Airways) are presently operating their passenger flights from and to Saidpur Airport.

Facilities Available

Car Parking, Passenger Lounge, Pure Drinking Water, Wheelchair, First Aid, Pure Drinking Water, Prayer Room, Wi-Fi and Help Line

NO Warehouse, Refuelling, Repairing and Handling Equipment.

Airport Manager, Saidpur, Bangladesh

Telephone: +880552672384, Cell: 01708167307
Email: apmsaidpur@caab.gov.bd


General Information

ICAO ID

VGSD

Time

UTC+6

Latitude

25.759228 (25° 45' 33.22" N)

Longitude

88.908869 (088° 54' 31.93" E)

Elevation

125 feet (38 meters)

Type

Commercial (Domestic)

Magnetic Variation

000° W (05/06)

Operating Agency

CAAB

Runways

ID

Dimensions

Surface

PCN

ILS

16/34

6000 x 100 feet (1829 x 30 meters)

ASPHALT

017FCYT

NO

Description

Runway 17

Runway 34

Surface

ASPHALT

ASPHALT

True Heading

1.600

3.400

Latitude

25.766958 (25° 46' 01.05" N)

25.751497 (25° 45' 05.39" N)

Longitude

88.905689 (088° 54' 20.48" E)

88.912053 (088° 54' 43.39" E)

Elevation

125.0 feet (38 meters)

125.0 feet (38 meters)

Slope

0.0°

0.0°

Landing Distance

6000 feet (1829 meters)

6000 feet (1829 meters)

Takeoff Distance

6394 feet (1949 meters)

6394 feet (1949 meters)

Overrun Length

394 feet (120 meters)

394 feet (120 meters)

Lighting System

V LIGHTS

V LIGHTS


For information on Bangladesh Airport additional information, please see the following documents: 

Bangladesh Common Information Airport Charges

Bangladesh Airports additional info

Bangladesh Costs 2013 Airfield Charges

Note: The information provided in the attached documents, which has been taken from the old DLCA, does not match the structure of the new LCA and is therefore provided separately.

For information on Bangladesh Airport contact details, please see the following link: 

4.5 Bangladesh Airport Contact List


2.2.5 Bangladesh Shah Makhdum Airport

Shah Makhdum airport is a domestic airport situated at the northwestern side of the country. It is about 10 km North of the Rajshahi city and beside Rajshahi-Nowgon highway. Now three Passenger flights (Biman Bangladesh Airlines, Novo Air and US-Bangla Airlines and Two Aviation Academy) are operating in this Airport. Two Aviation Academy (Pilot training school) are running here. They have six/ seven training Aircraft those are operating from this Airport. Besides this domestic cargo flights are also operating to and from different destination at Shah Makhdum Airport. Facilities available are:

  • Airconditioned waiting lounge
  • Free Wi-Fi facilities
  • Canteen Facilities
  • Given flight information by PA system
  • Separate smoking zone and prayer room
  • Supply of cold and hot water as required

Airport Manager

Shah Makhdum Airport, Rajshahi

Phone: +880 2 47800053 (Off), Cell: +880 1708167303, +880 1556300056

e-mail: apmrajshahi@caab.gov.bd

General Information

ICAO ID

VGRJ

Time

UTC+6

Latitude

24.437219 (24° 26' 13.99" N)

Longitude

88.616511 (088° 36' 59.44" E)

Elevation

64 feet (20 meters)

Magnetic Variation

000° W (05/06)

Operating Agency

CAAB (LANDING FEES AND DIPLOMATIC CLEARANCE MAY BE REQUIRED)

Runways

ID

Dimensions

Surface

PCN

ILS

17/35

6000 x 100 feet (1829 x 30 meters)

ASPHALT

017RCYT

NO

Description

Runway 17

Runway 35

Surface

ASPHALT

ASPHALT

True Heading

1.700

3.500

Latitude

24.445333 (24° 26' 43.20" N)

24.429103 (24° 25' 44.77" N)

Longitude

88.614961 (088° 36' 53.86" E)

88.618064 (088° 37' 05.03" E)

Elevation

55.0 feet (17 meters)

55.0 feet (17 meters)

Landing Distance

6000 feet (1829 meters)

6000 feet (1829 meters)

Takeoff Distance

6200 feet (1890 meters)

6400 feet (1951 meters)

Overrun Length

200 feet (61 meters)

400 feet (122 meters)

Overrun Surface

ASPHALT

ASPHALT

Lighting System

V LIGHTS

V LIGHTS


Bangladesh Common Information Airport Charges

Bangladesh Airports additional info

Bangladesh Costs 2013 Airfield Charges

Note: The information provided in the attached documents, which has been taken from the old DLCA, does not match the structure of the new LCA and is therefore provided separately.

For information on Bangladesh Airport contact details, please see the following link: 

4.5 Bangladesh Airport Contact List

2.2.6 Bangladesh Jessore Airport

During the 2nd World War the British Government constructed an air base in Jashore for British Air Force. In 1945 the air base was in operation. In 1950, the Pakistan Army and Air Force base was established. In 1956, initiatives were taken to start a full airport in Jashore and completed in 1960. The airport is operated by the Civil Aviation Authority of Bangladesh, but it is also used by the Bangladesh Air Force as a part of BAF Matiur Rahman Base and training airfield for Bangladesh Air Force Academy.

This airport is located at 7 km north of Jashore city and 140 km south-west from Dhaka, the capital city of Bangladesh.

The only destination is Dhaka for the passengers. Four airlines (Biman Bangladesh Airlines, Novo Air, United Airways and US-Bangla Airlines) are presently operating their passenger flights in Jashore-Dhaka-Jashore route. Besides this domestic cargo flights are also operating to and from different destination at Jashore airport. Following are the available facilities:

  • Car parking facility
  • Drinking water
  • Baggage scanning
  • VIP/ CIP lounges
  • Passenger lounge
  • Ramp and wheelchair facilities
  • Sanitation facilities
  • Free Wi-Fi
  • TV

Airport Manager, Jashore

Tel: +880 421 64033, Cell: +880 1708167298, Tower: +880 421 65032,

e-mail : apmJashore@caab.gov.bd

General Information

ICAO ID

VGJR

Time

UTC+6

Latitude

23.183800 (23° 11' 01.68" N)

Longitude

89.160833 (089° 09' 39.00" E)

Elevation

20 feet (6 meters)

Magnetic Variation

000° W (05/06)

Operating Agency

MILITARY - CIVIL JOINT USE AIRPORT

Runways

ID

Dimensions

Surface

PCN

ILS

16/34

8000 x 150 feet (2438 x 46 meters)

ASPHALT

018FCYT

NO

Description

Runway 16

Runway 34

Surface

ASPHALT

ASPHALT

True Heading

1.580

3.380

Latitude

23.193833 (23° 11' 37.80" N)

23.173767 (23° 10' 25.56" N)

Longitude

89.156333 (089° 09' 22.80" E)

89.165333 (089° 09' 55.20" E)

Elevation

20.0 feet (6 meters)

20.0 feet (6 meters)

Slope

0.0°

0.0°

Landing Distance

8000 feet (2438 meters)

8000 feet (2438 meters)

Takeoff Distance

8485 feet (2586 meters)

8318 feet (2535 meters)

Overrun Length

485 feet (148 meters)

318 feet (97 meters)

Overrun Surface

ASPHALT

ASPHALT

Lighting System

PAPI LIGHTS

PAPI LIGHTS


Bangladesh Common Information Airport Charges

Bangladesh Airports additional info

Bangladesh Costs 2013 Airfield Charges

Note: The information provided in the attached documents, which has been taken from the old DLCA, does not match the structure of the new LCA and is therefore provided separately.

For information on Bangladesh Airport contact details, please see the following link: 

4.5 Bangladesh Airport Contact List

2.2.7 Bangladesh Barisal Airport

In 1963-64 the Plant Protection Department acquired 13.09 acres land to spray pesticides by aircraft and made an airstrip sized 1800'-0" x 60'-0". Later 1970-71 by the order from the government The Department of Civil Aviation acquired more 85.46 acres land for the purpose of launching an airport in the south but after the acquisition it was closed.

In 1990-91 the construction work of the airport was started. After completing the work of runway (2300'-0" x 100'-0") in July 1995, Civil Aviation Authority of Bangladesh was able to open a stall-port (current "Barisal Airport") for executing commercial aircraft. At present runway 6000'-0" x 100'-0" is available. A number of airlines started its passenger flights but again closed after few months because this route is not viable for airlines business but this airport is capable of handling any type of domestic aircraft like other domestic airports. Barisal airport may be used in time of any disaster, as it was the case during Cyclone Sidr emergency operations in 2007 when it become a logistics hub as well as an operational coordination center. Facilities available are:

  • Car parking
  • Drinking water
  • VIP/CIP Lounges
  • Wheel chair facilities
  • Free Wi-Fi

Airport Manager, Barisal

Phone: +880 4327 73362 (Off), Cell: +880 01708167315,

Fax : +880 4327 73362, email : apmbarisal @caab.gov.bd

 General Information

ICAO ID

VGBR

Time

UTC+6

Latitude

22.801031 (22° 48' 03.71" N)

Longitude

90.301164 (090° 18' 04.19" E)

Elevation

23 feet (7 meters)

Magnetic Variation

000° W (05/06)

Operating Agency

CAAB, (Landing Fees and Diplomatic Clearance May be Required)

Runways

ID

Dimensions

Surface

PCN

ILS

17/35

5995 x 100 feet (1827 x 30 meters)

Asphalt

017RCYT

NO

Description

Runway 17

Runway 35

Surface

Asphalt

Asphalt

True Heading

1.740

3.540

Latitude

22.809236 (22° 48' 33.25" N)

22.792828 (22° 47' 34.18" N)

Longitude

90.300219 (090° 18' 00.79" E)

90.302108 (090° 18' 07.59" E)

Elevation

10.0 feet (3 meters)

10.0 feet (3 meters)

Landing Distance

5995 feet (1827 meters)

5995 feet (1827 meters)

Takeoff Distance

6195 feet (1888 meters)

6160 feet (1878 meters)

Overrun Length

200 feet (61 meters)

165 feet (50 meters)

Overrun Surface

Asphalt

Asphalt

Lighting System

PAPI

PAPI


Bangladesh Common Information Airport Charges

Bangladesh Airports additional info

Bangladesh Costs 2013 Airfield Charges

Note: The information provided in the attached documents, which has been taken from the old DLCA, does not match the structure of the new LCA and is therefore provided separately.

For contact details, please see the following link: 

4.5 Bangladesh Airport Contact List

2.2.8 Bangladesh Cox's Bazar Airport

General Information

ICAO ID

VGCB

Time

UTC+6

Latitude

21.452194 (21° 27' 07.90" N)

Longitude

91.963889 (091° 57' 50.00" E)

Elevation

12 feet (4 meters)

Magnetic Variation

000° W (05/06)

Operating Agency

CAAB (Landing Fees and Diplomatic Clearance May be Required)

Ground handling

No equipment is available now. Only few hand trolleys and Ladder are available which are again arranged by the individual operators.

Immigration

-

Fuelling

Standard Asiatic Oil Ltd has been entrusted with the responsivity of proving Fuel to all the visiting aircrafts. At present they have 3 Fuel tanks with capacity of total 1,00,000 Ltr. They are located at the Airport vicinity and have 2 Refuellers to provide fuel to the aircrafts. They have 15 personnel at Cox’s Bazar (Contact Mr Nazmul, Manager-01715313454).

Storage Capacity

Nil, but the concrete parking area can be used for emergency purpose by raising temporary sheds over an area of approx. 45,000 sq ft.

Operation Hours

08:00 AM to 17:00 PM

Man power

Total 150 (CAAB-70+Attached-30+Project-50)

Security arrangement

Construction works are going on, so no fool-proof boundary wall is there. Own security personnel and Ansar is looking after the security of Airport.


Cox's Bazar Airport started as a domestic airport in 1956. Due to the damage of the airport during liberation war in 1971, Cox's Bazar Airport was re-opened as a domestic airport at the end of 1971. This airport is situated on 941 acres of land. Cox's Bazar Airport is managed by the Civil Aviation Authority of Bangladesh. The airport is located 1.5 kilometres from Cox's Bazar City and 396km from Dhaka. This Airport operates only Cox’s Bazar- Dhaka passenger flights, but recently there is a flight between Cox’s Bazar and Chattogram twice a week. Ffour airlines are operating their passenger flights from and to Cox's Bazar Airport.

  • Biman Bangladesh Airlines Ltd
  • Novo Air Ltd
  • Us Bangla Airlines Ltd
  • Regent Airways Ltd

And following five cargo flights are operating their flights from Cox's Bazar Airport to Jashore for carrying fish fries.

  • Sky Capital Airlines Ltd (3 FSO B737's)
  • Bismillah Airlines Ltd (operating 2 aircraft; one AN28 and one HS-740)
  • True Aviation Ltd (one AN26)
  • Easy air Ltd (one SAAB 340).

Following facilities are available at the airport:

  • Car parking
  • Drinking water
  • VIP/CIP Lounges
  • Ramp and wheel chair facilities.
  • Free Wi-Fi service

Md Abdullah Faruk

Airport Manager, Cox's Bazar, Bangladesh.

Cell: 01708167294, Telephone: +880341-52353, +880341-64479, Email: apmcox@caab.gov.bd

TWR: +880341-62010

Runways

ID

Dimensions

Surface

PCN

ILS

17/35

9000 x 125 feet (2743 x 38 meters)

Bituminous Concrete

63/R/C/W/T

NO

Description

Runway 17

Runway 35

Surface

Bituminous concrete

Bituminous concrete

True Heading

1.690

3.490

Latitude

21.461336 (21° 27' 40.81" N)

21.443056 (21° 26' 35.00" N)

Longitude

91.962044 (091° 57' 43.36" E)

91.965731 (091° 57' 56.63" E)

Elevation

12.0 feet (4 meters)

12.0 feet (4 meters)

Landing Distance

8860 feet (2700 meters)

8860 feet (2700 meters)

Takeoff Distance

9500 feet (2895 meters)

9500 feet (2895 meters)

Overrun Length

460 feet (140 meters)

490 feet (149 meters)


Future Development

Considering the importance and traffic at the present scenario the government has decided to expand and upgrade the Cox’s Bazar Airport to an international airport, its 2nd largest. Development works are going on and the new terminal building is expected to be completed by 2020. To promote Cox's Bazar Airport as International Airport, a project called Cox's Bazar Airport Development Project is in progress. Following works are being carried out under the project:

  • Increase the runway length from 9,000 feet to 10,000 feet.
  • Establishment of Airfield Ground Lighting System
  • Purchase  of firefighting vehicle
  • ILS, DVOR, DME, FIDS, PA system etc.
  • Construction of new terminal building on-going

Cox’s Bazar international airport is a huge proposed project by the government handled by the civil aviation authority of Bangladesh to provide the international standard facilities to the incoming passengers. Due to the geographical location and tourism characteristic of the area there is a continued air traffic growth that encourages Cox’s Bazar International Airport to be design more appropriately and equipped with better facilities. Beside the above ongoing development works, a master plan has been taken in hand to make this airport a modern international airport by 2030. As per this master plan total land over the area west of the existing runway till seashore is being acquisitioned. Necessary earth filling works is in progress to expand the runway up to 10,000 feet. The settlers of that area will be rehabilitated in a suitable area by the government.


For additional information, please see the following documents: 

Bangladesh Common Information Airport Charges

Bangladesh Airports additional info

Bangladesh Costs 2013 Airfield Charges

Note: The information provided in the attached documents, which has been taken from the old DLCA, does not match the structure of the new LCA and is therefore provided separately.

For contact details, please see the following link: 

4.5 Bangladesh Airport Contact List

2.2.9 Bangladesh Thakuragaon Airport

Airport Details

Country

Bangladesh

Latitude

26° 2’ 0” N

Province / District

N/A

Longitude

88° 28’ 0” E

Airport Name

Thakuragaon Airport

Elevation (ft)

N/A

IATA & ICAO codes

TKR / VGSG

Surface

N/A

Town or City (closest)

Thakurgaon

Runway Condition

N/A

NGO / UN (on ground)

N/A

Passenger / Cargo Security Screening (Yes / No)

N/A

Runway Dimension

N/A

Ground Handling (Yes / No)

N/A

Refueling Capacity

N/A

Runway Lighting (Yes / No)

N/A

Runway Heading

N/A

Fire Fighting Equipment (Yes / No)

N/A

Air Traffic Control (Yes / No)

N/A

Windsock (Yes / No)

N/A

Weather Information (Yes / No)

N/A

Aircraft Parking space (Yes / No)

N/A

Navigation Aids (Yes / No)

N/A

Perimeter fencing (Yes / No)

N/A


For additional information, please see the following documents: 

Bangladesh Common Information Airport Charges

Bangladesh Airports additional info

Bangladesh Costs 2013 Airfield Charges

Note: The information provided in the attached documents, which has been taken from the old DLCA, does not match the structure of the new LCA and is therefore provided separately.

For contact details, please see the following link: 

4.5 Bangladesh Airport Contact List

2.2.10 Bangladesh Ishurdi Airport

Airport Details

Country

Bangladesh

Latitude

24.158347 / N 24° 09' 30.05"

Province / District

N/A

Longitude

24.158347 / N 24° 09' 30.05"

Airport Name

Ishurdi Airport

Elevation (ft)

N/A

IATA & ICAO codes

IRD / VGIS

Surface

Asphalt

Town or City (closest)

Ishurdi

Runway Condition

N/A

NGO / UN (on ground)

N/A

Passenger / Cargo Security Screening (Yes / No)

N/A

Runway Dimension

1432.6m x 24.4

Ground Handling (Yes / No)

N/A

Refueling Capacity

N/A

Runway Lighting (Yes / No)

N/A

Runway Heading

N/A

Fire Fighting Equipment (Yes / No)

N/A

Air Traffic Control (Yes / No)

N/A

Windsock (Yes / No)

N/A

Weather Information (Yes / No)

N/A

Aircraft Parking space (Yes / No)

N/A

Navigation Aids (Yes / No)

N/A

Perimeter fencing (Yes / No)

N/A


For additional information, please see the following documents: 

Bangladesh Common Information Airport Charges

Bangladesh Airports additional info

Bangladesh Costs 2013 Airfield Charges

Note: The information provided in the attached documents, which has been taken from the old DLCA, does not match the structure of the new LCA and is therefore provided separately.

For contact details, please see the following link: 

4.5 Bangladesh Airport Contact List

2.2.11 Bangladesh Shamshernagar Airport

Airport Details

Country

Bangladesh

Latitude

24.39861

Province / District

Shamshernagar

Longitude

91.92111

Airport Name

Shamshernagar Airport

Elevation (ft)

N/A

IATA & ICAO codes

RJH / VGSH

Surface

Asphalt

Town or City (closest)

N/A

Runway Condition

N/A

NGO / UN (on ground)

N/A

Passenger / Cargo Security Screening (Yes / No)

N/A

Runway Dimension

1,650 m

Ground Handling (Yes / No)

N/A

Refueling Capacity

N/A

Runway Lighting (Yes / No)

N/A

Runway Heading

N/A

Fire Fighting Equipment (Yes / No)

N/A

Air Traffic Control (Yes / No)

N/A

Windsock (Yes / No)

N/A

Weather Information (Yes / No)

N/A

Aircraft Parking space (Yes / No)

N/A

Navigation Aids (Yes / No)

N/A

Perimeter fencing (Yes / No)

N/A


For additional information, please see the following documents: 

Bangladesh Common Information Airport Charges

Bangladesh Airports additional info

Bangladesh Costs 2013 Airfield Charges

Note: The information provided in the attached documents, which has been taken from the old DLCA, does not match the structure of the new LCA and is therefore provided separately.

For contact details, please see the following link: 

4.5 Bangladesh Airport Contact List

2.2.12 Bangladesh Tejgaon Airport

Tejgaon Airport in Dhaka served as the country's sole international airport prior to the construction of Shahjalal International Airport. Following the transfer of civilian flights to the newly built Shahjalal International Airport in 1981, Tejgaon was taken under the control of the Bangladesh Air Force.

It is probable that Tejgaon Airport will be an important operational base for air relief operations (as it was during Cyclone Sidr emergency operations in 2007) for the Armed Forces Division and the Air Force and the other Bangladesh Defense Forces. The compound includes all necessary facilities (storage capacities, operational rooms, etc.) as well as significant areas for open storage and/or setting up Mobile Storage Units (MSU's).

General Information

ICAO ID

VGTJ

Time

UTC+6

Latitude

23.778783 (23° 46' 43.62" N)

Longitude

90.382689 (090° 22' 57.68" E)

Elevation

24 feet (7 meters)

Type

Military

Magnetic Variation

000° W (05/06)

Operating Agency

Military

Runways

ID

Dimensions

Surface

PCN

ILS

17/35

9315 x 98 feet (2839 x 30 meters)

Asphalt

012FCYT

NO

Description

Runway 17

Runway 35

Surface

Asphalt

Asphalt

True Heading

1.640

3.440

Latitude

23.791131 (23° 47' 28.07" N)

23.766436 (23° 45' 59.17" N)

Longitude

90.378953 (090° 22' 44.23" E)

90.386422 (090° 23' 11.12" E)

Landing Distance

7530 feet (2295 meters)

8310 feet (2533 meters)

Takeoff Distance

9315 feet (2839 meters)

9315 feet (2839 meters)

Displaced Threshold Length

1785 feet (544 meters)

1005 feet (306 meters)


Bangladesh Common Information Airport Charges

Bangladesh Airports additional info

Bangladesh Costs 2013 Airfield Charges

Note: The information provided in the attached documents, which has been taken from the old DLCA, does not match the structure of the new LCA and is therefore provided separately.

For contact details, please see the following link: 

4.5 Bangladesh Airport Contact List

2.2.13 Bangladesh Comilla Airport

Airport Details

Country

Bangladesh

Latitude

23.43681

Province / District

N/A

Longitude

91.18986

Airport Name

Comilla Airport

Elevation (ft)

N/A

IATA & ICAO codes

CLA / -

Surface

N/A

Town or City (closest)

Comilla

Runway Condition

N/A

NGO / UN (on ground)

N/A

Passenger / Cargo Security Screening (Yes / No)

N/A

Runway Dimension

1.650m x n/a

Ground Handling (Yes / No)

N/A

Refueling Capacity

N/A

Runway Lighting (Yes / No)

N/A

Runway Heading

N/A

Fire Fighting Equipment (Yes / No)

N/A

Air Traffic Control (Yes / No)

N/A

Windsock (Yes / No)

N/A

Weather Information (Yes / No)

N/A

Aircraft Parking space (Yes / No)

N/A

Navigation Aids (Yes / No)

N/A

Perimeter fencing (Yes / No)

N/A


For additional information, please see the following documents: 

Bangladesh Common Information Airport Charges

Bangladesh Airports additional info

Bangladesh Costs 2013 Airfield Charges

Note: The information provided in the attached documents, which has been taken from the old DLCA, does not match the structure of the new LCA and is therefore provided separately.

For contact details, please see the following link: 

4.5 Bangladesh Airport Contact List

2.3 Bangladesh Road Network


Bangladesh Roads


Overview

The main road network of the country is under the Roads and Highways Department (RHD). Maintenance of the roads including bridges is carried out by RHD. There is approximately 21,483 km of roads under this department. The road network capable to carry vehicles has increased significantly and is increasing every year. Bangladesh government realises the importance of road maintenance and the RHD has given more emphasis on this subject. Only a few years back there was no proper planning and system for road maintenance and international agencies assisted the Government of Bangladesh to address and solve the problem.

The Ministry of Road Transport and Bridges is the  body for formulation and administration of the rules, regulations and laws relating to road transport, national highways and bridges. Bangladesh has 4 ministries responsible for transportation within the country. They are:

The Ministry of Road Transport and Bridges has 2 Divisions : the Road Transport and Highways Division and the Bridge Division. RHD has again 4 components

 

Roads and Highways Department (RHD)

The Roads and Highways Department (RHD) within the Ministry of Road Transport and Bridges, is responsible for the management of approximately 21,483 km comprising 3 categories of road classes (National, Regional and Zilla road).

List of Officers- RHD

Sl

Office Name & Designation

Cell No

E-mail

1

Chief Engineer, RHD

01730782500

ce@rhd.gov.bd

2

Addl Chief Engineer (Dhaka Planning & Maintenance Wing)

01730782520

acepmz@rhd.gov.bd

3

Addl Chief Engineer, (Dhaka Zone)

01730782592

acedha@rhd.gov.bd

4

Addl Chief Engineer (Chattogram Zone)

01730782677

acechi@rhd.gov.bd

5

Addl Chief Engineer (Rajshahi Zone)

01730782703

aceraj@rhd.gov.bd

6

Addl Chief Engineer (Cumilla Zone)

01730782639

acecom@rhd.gov.bd

7

Addl Chief Engineer (Rangpur Zone)

01730782725

aceran@rhd.gov.bd

8

Addl Chief Engineer (Khulna Zone)

01730782754

acekhu@rhd.gov.bd

9

Addl Chief Engineer (Barisal Zone)

01730782782

acebar@rhd.gov.bd

10

Addl Chief Engineer (Sylhet Zone)

01730782660

acesyl@rhd.gov.bd

Road Network at a Glance

Road Data

Road length by classification

National Highway 

3,544.06 Km

Regional Highway 

4,280.02 Km

Zilla Road 

13,659.13 Km

Total Road Length 

21,483.21 Km

Road Length by Surface Type according to latest survey

Bituminous 

16,815.61 Km

Earth 

698.47 Km

HBB 

660.81 Km

Cement Concrete (CC) 

2.44 Km

Cement Blocks 

0.37 Km

Total Paved Road Length 

17,516.89 Km

Total Unpaved Road Length 

660.81 Km

Total Surveyed Road Length 

18,177.70 Km

Length of Road Not Surveyed 

3,305.51 Km

Number of Culverts

Slab Culvert 

3991

Box Culvert 

9441

Arch Masonry 

318

Pipe Culvert 

1

Total Number of Culverts 

13751

Number of Bridges

Truss with Timber Deck 

8

Truss with RCC Slab 

68

RCC Bridge 

325

RCC Girder Bridge 

4089

Steel Beam & RCC Slab 

335

PC Box 

9

Baily with Steel Deck 

1438

Baily with Timber Deck 

36

Truss with Steel Deck 

538

PC Girder Bridge 

895

Total Number of Bridges 

7741

Total Number of Structures 

21492


Categories of Roads

National Highways connect the national capital with different divisional and old district headquarters port cities and international highways. These roads have been categorised as National Highways considering the national importance and geographical positions. Each National Highway has been provided with a name and a number, such as Dhaka-Chattogram Highway has been numbered N-1 whereas N stands for National. This number can only be changed by RHD headquarters.


Highway No.

Detailed Route

Length

N1 

Dhaka (N8) - Katchpur (N2) - Madanpur (N105) - Mainamati (N102) - Cumilla (R140) - Feni (N104) - Chattogram (N106) - Manashertek (N107) - SaBDTania (N108) - Ramu (N109) - Cox's Bazar (N110) - Teknaf

455 km

N2 

Katchpur (N1) - Bhulta (N105) - Sarail (N102) - Jagadishpur (N204) - Shaistaganj (N204) - Mirpur(N207) - Sherpur (N207) - Sylhet (N205, *N208) - Jaintiapur - Jaflong

286 km

N3 

Dhaka - Progoti Sarani (N301) - Tongi (N302) - Joydebpur (N105, N4) - Mymensingh

112 km

N4 

Joydebpur (N3, R310) - Kadda (N105) - Tangail (N404) - Elenga (N405) - Madhupur (N401) - Jamalpur

146 km

N5 

Dhaka - Mirpur Bridge (N501) - Nabinagar (R505) - Manikganj (R504) -Muljan - Uthali (N503) - (ferry) - Natakhola - Baderhat (N505, N513) - Kashinathpur (N6, N504) - Shahjanpur (N515) - Banani (N514) - Bogura western bypass: Jahangirabad (N502) - Tinmatha (N510) - Matidali (N514, N515) - Mordern More (N506) - Rangpur bypass (N517) - Saidpur bypass (N518) - Beldanga (N508) - Thakurgaon - Panchagarh - Tentulia - IND (Banglabandha)

507 km

N6 

Kashinathpur (N5, N504) - Pabna bypass (N604) - Gaspara (N604) - Dasuria (N704, N705) - Banpara (N507) - Harispur (N602) - Chawk Bidaynath (N602) - Belpukur (N603) - Rajshahi (R680)

150 km

N7 

Daulatdia Ferryghat - Goalchamot (N803) - Magura (N704) - Arappur (N704) - Jhenaidah - Hamdah (N703) - Palbari (N707, N708) - Chanchra (N706) - Murail (N707) - Phultala (N709) - Khulna - (ferry) - Kudir Battala (N709) – Digraj

252 km

N8 

Dhaka - Mawa Ferryghat (R812) - (ferry) - Bhanga (N804, N805) - Barisal (N809) - Patuakhali

191 km

N102 

Sarail (N2) - Ghaturia (N103) - Brahmanbaria - Kuatali (N103) - Mainamati (N1)

82 km

N104 

Feni (N1) - Chowmohani (R140) - Noakhali - Somapur R140 connects to N809 at Lakshmipur

49 km

N105 

Kadda (N4) - Joydebpur (N3) - DeBoguram (N301) - Bhulta (N2) - Madanpur (N1) Dhaka eastern bypass, partly under construction

49 km

N106 

Chattogram (N1) - Hathazari - Rangamati

65 km

N107 

Manashertek (N1) - Boalkhali

12 km

N108 

SaBDTania (N1) - Bandarban (R161)

22 km

N204 

Jagadishpur (N2) - Chunarughat - Shaistaganj (N2)

34 km

N207 

Mirpur (N2) - Srimangal - Moulvibazar (N208) - Sherpur (N2)

68 km

N208 

Moulvibazar (N207) - Sylhet bypass (N2, N209)

59 km

N301 

Progoti Smarini (N3) - DeBoguram (N105) under construction

13 km

N302 

Tongi (N3) - Dhour (N501) - Yearpur (N511) - Baipal (R505) R505 connects to N5 at Nabinagar

18 km

N309 

Khagdahar (N401) - Mymensingh bypass (N3)

13 km

N401 

Madhupur (N4) - Khagdahar (N309) - Mymensingh (N3)

47 km

N405 

Elenga (N4) - Hatikamrul (N5, N507)

18 km

N501 

Mirpur Bridge (N5) - Berulia (N511) - Dhour (N302)

14 km

N502 

Natore (N602) - Bogura (N5)

63 km

N506 

Mordern More (N5) - Lalbag more (N517) - Barabari (N509) - Kurigram

50 km

N507 

Hatikamrul (N5, N405) - Banpara (N6)

51 km

N508 

Beldanga (N5) - Dinajpur (R585)

16 km

N509 

Baranari (N506) - Lalmonirhat - Patgram - IND (Burimari)

105 km

N511 

Berulia (N501) - Yearpur (N302)

13 km

N513 

Baderhat (N5, N505) – Khayerchar

11 km

N515 

Shahjanpur (N5) - Matidali Bogura eastern bypass, under construction

16 km

N603 

Belpukur (N6) - Paba - Kashiadanga (R680)

21 km

N702 

Magura (N7) - Jashore (N708, N706, N707)

44 km

N704 

Dasuria (N6, N705) - Ruppur (N705) - Kushtia - Arappur (N7) - Jhenaidah (N703)

81 km

N706 

Jashore (N702, N707) - Chanchra (N7) - Benapole (N711) - IND (NH35)

38 km

N709 

Khulna bypass: Phultala (N7) - Kudir Battala (N7)

27 km

N804 

Alipur (N803) - Bhanga (N8, N805)

32 km

N805 

Bhanga (N8, N804) - Bhatiapara (N806) - Gopalganj (R850) - Mollarhat (R856) Gopalganj section under construction

80 km

N809 

Barisal (N8) - (ferry) - Chatarmatha - (ferry) - Lakshmipur (R140) R140 connects to N104 at Chowmohani

50 km

Regional Highways connect different regions and new district headquarters not connected by National Highways and Zilla Roads. Regional Highways are named after National Highways of national importance. Names and numbers of these highways are decided such as Cumilla-Lalmai, R-140, whereas R stands for Regional meaning the Region. This number can only be changed by RHD headquarters.

Zilla Roads are defined as Roads connecting Upazila head quarters and other important rural centres with the existing Road network. Name and numbers of these roads are decided such as Akhaura-Agartala, Z-1203 whereas Z stands for Zilla.

Important Highway Conditions

Dhaka-Chattogram- Cox’s Bazar Highway General Information

Total distance

Approx 406 Km

Total travel time

9-10 hours

Road classification

National Highway

Security (Good, marginal, bad)

Security is good, while road safety is bad as in the entire country

Main towns/hubs

Dhaka, Narayongonj, Munshigonj, Cumilla, Feni, Chattogram and Cox’s Bazar

Seasonal variations

Floods may occur temporarilly during the Monsoon season

Bridges and Obstacles

4 (Kachpur, Meghna, Daudkandi and Karnaphuli bridge)

Traffic conditions

Congested in few choke points

Dhaka-Sylhet-Tamabil Highway General Information

Total distance

Approx 287 Km

Total travel time

5 to 6 hours

Road classification

National Highway

Security (Good, marginal, bad)

Security is good, while road safety is bad as in the entire country

Main towns/hubs

Dhaka, Tarabo, Borpa, Bhulta, Pachdona, Shahepratap, Itakhola, Bhairab, Sarail, Jagadishpur, Shaistaganj, Mirpur, Aushkandi, Syedpur, Sherpur and Tamabil

Seasonal variations

Floods may occur temporarilly during the Monsoon season

Bridges and Obstacles

2 ( Kanchan, Bhairab, Sherpur, Keane and shari bridge)

Trafic Condition

Congested in few choke points

Dhaka-Banglabandha Highway General Information

Total distance

Approx 529 Km

Total travel time

11-12 hours

Road classification

National Highway

Security (Good, marginal, bad)

Security is good, while road safety is bad as in the entire country

Main towns/hubs

Dhaka, Manikgonj, Pabna, Sirajgonj, Bogura, Gaibandha, Rangpur, Nilphamari,Dinajpur, Thakurgaon and Panchgarh. But shortcut is following N4 upto Jamuna bridge (via Gajipur and Tangail)

Seasonal variations

Floods may occur temporarily during the Monsoon season

Bridges and Obstacles

Jamuna Bangabondhu bridge)

Trafic Condition

Congested in few choke points

Dhaka-Jashore- Benapole Highway General Information

Total distance

Approx 234 Km

Total travel time

7-8 hours

Road classification

National Highway

Security (Good, marginal, bad)

Security is good, while road safety is bad as in the entire country

Main towns/hubs

Dhaka, Manikgonj, Faridpur, Magura, Jashore, Benapole (Follow N5, N7, N702 and N706)

Seasonal variations

Floods may occur temporarilly during the Monsoon season

Bridges and Obstacles

(Paturia Ferry and Modhukhali Bridge)

Trafic Condition

Congested in few choke points

Dhaka-Gopalgonj-Mongla Highway General Information

Total distance

Approx 240 Km

Total travel time

7-8 hours (excluding Ferry time)

Road classification

National Highway

Security (Good, marginal, bad)

Security is good, while road safety is bad as in the entire country

Main towns/hubs

Dhaka, Munshigonj, Mawa, Bhanga (Madaripur) (following N8), Gopalgonj (following N805), Bagerhat, then follow N7 to reach Mongla.

Seasonal variations

Floods may occur temporarilly during the Monsoon season

Bridges and Obstacles

Babubazar/Postogola, Dhaleshwari bridge, Padma bridge/Ferry, Arial Khan and Mollahat bridge)

Trafic Condition

Congested in few choke points

Development Projects

The Bangladesh Road Master Plan 2007 estimated the medium growth forecast of both freight and passenger transport which will be 6% over the master plan period of 2005-25. As such, issues related to road network have been identified by RHD, which are follows:

  • National Highways are needed to be upgraded into 4/6 lanes with medians to commensurate with higher traffic growth and to improve road safety
  • Construction of new bridges to ensure uninterrupted traffic flow including replacement and major repair of existing old narrow bridges for ensuring safety
  • Road safety to be properly addressed in road design and enforced in traffic management
  • Developing comfortable road network to enhance the tourism industry
  • Maintenance needs a higher priority, more resources, improved management reform and better quality standard
  • Institutional reform, and
  • Digitalization of RHD activities

In addition, LGED under the purview of rural road master plan has been developing the farm to market roads. It has prioritized Upazila, Union and Village roads and a target was set for development of additional 22000 Km Upazila and Union Roads in future. The low lying topography requiring a substantial raised earth embankment of

all kinds of roads, frequent flooding during monsoon due to global climate change phenomena and washing out the road embankment are emerging of challenges of the sector.

Important Ongoing Projects

Construction of Tunnel under the River Karnaphuli, Ctg

The implementation work of 3.40 kilometer long tunnel under the river Karnaphuli at a cost of BDT.8,446.46 crore is progressing and 20 percent of physical work has already been completed. This tunnel will connect west part of Chattogram city to East part, reduce traffic jam and ease direct road communication among Dhaka- Chattogram-Cox’s Bazar. Besides, it will contribute to GDP growth about 0.16 percent. The project has been approved in the ECNEC meeting in 24 November 2015. Land acquisition and preparation of detailed design work is in progress.

Construction of BRT Lane (Elevated Section)

 Steps have been taken to construct of 20 kilometer long Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) lane at the cost of BDT.2,039.85 crore from Gazipur to Hazrat Shah Jalal(R) international Airport. Bangladesh Bridge Authority (BBA) is responsible for implementation of 4.5-kilometer elevated section. The implementation work is progressing and expected to be completed in 2020

Construction of Dhaka-Ashulia Elevated Expressway

To construct about 24-kilometer-long Dhaka-Ashulia Elevated Expressway from Hazrat Shah Jalal (R) international airport to EPZ through Ashulia, the project has been approved by the ECNEC with an estimated cost of BDT. 16,901.32 crore. To construct the expressway on G-to-G basis, commercial agreement has been signed with a Chinese Government nominated company. It is expected to complete the project by 2022. It will connect Asian Highway Network and almost all National Highway. Moreover, it will reduce traffic congestion in Abdullahpur-Ashulia-Baipail-Chandra corridor.

Construction of Dhaka East-West Elevated Expressway

To construct about 39.24 kilometer long Elevated Expressway from Baliapur of Dhaka-Aricha highway to Langolbond of Dhaka-Chattogram road through Nimtoli-Keranigonj-Fatulla-Bandor, PDPP has been approved with an estimated cost of BDT.16,388.50 crore. Malaysian Government has given proposal to construct it through G-to-G basis. This expressway will connect National Highways and Asian Highway. It will reduce traffic congestion in and around Dhaka city and traffic from Chattogram, Sylhet and other eastern part and from south western region through Padma Bridge to the north-western districts will be convenient.

Conduct Feasibility Study to Construct Subway (Underground Metro) in Dhaka city

Initiative has been taken to construct subway in order to reduce traffic jam in Dhaka city. In this process 4 preliminary alignments have been selected. But present plan is to construct route-1 (Tongi- Airport- Kakoli- Mohakhali- Moghbazar- Palton- Shapla Chottor-Sayedabad- Narayangonj Signboard) and Route-2 (Aminbazar-Gabtoli-Asad gate-New market-TSC-Ittefaq-Sayedabad). To conduct Feasibility Study, the consultant has been appointed with the cost of BDT.219.44 crore and study will start very soon.

Feasibility Study of Tunnel Under the River Jamuna

Initiative has been taken to conduct feasibility study to construct tunnel under the river Jamuna which connects Gaibandha and Jamalpur district. The study will start in time after approval of proposed project by the concern authority.

Construction of Other Large Bridges

In order to maintain uninterrupted road network, initiatives have been taken to build new bridges at different location. As a part of this, feasibility study for construction of bridges at ‘Rahmatpur-Babugonj-Muladi-Hijla’ roads over Arialkha river, at ‘Lebukhali-dumki-boga-Doshamina-golacipa -Amragachi’ roads over Golacipa river, at ‘Kocua-betagi-Potuakhali-Lohalia-Kalia’ roads over Payra river has been completed. PDPP has been approved for these three proposed bridge costing of BDT.1,944.24 crore. It is expected that construction of these bridges will start very soon.

Moreover, feasibility study is going on for 5 other bridges; over Payra river in Patuakhali-Amtoli-Borguna roads, over Karkhana river in Bakergonj-Baufol road, over Meghna river in Bhulta-Araihazar-Nabinagar roads, over Bishkhali river in Borguna-Pathorghata road and over Tetulia and Kalabodor river which connect Barishal with Bhola. Construction work of these bridges will start in time.


Road Distance Matrix

Distance Matrix for all the districts of Bangladesh is shown as a chart below:

 

Bangladesh Road Transport Authority (BRTA)

Bangladesh Road Transport Authority (BRTA) was Established under section 2A of Motor Vehicle Ordinance 1983, (Amendment-1987) Vide SRO No-303/Law/87/MVRT/1E-7/84(part), Dated 20/12/87 and has been functioning since January 1988. BRTA is the regulatory body to control, manage and ensure discipline in the road transport sector and road safety related areas in Bangladesh. It is an authority under the Ministry of Roads and Bridges for carrying out the purposes mentioned in the Motor Vehicle Ordinance, 1983. The Chairman is the chief executive of the authority. He exercises such power and performs such function as prescribed by rules and assigned by the government from time to time. For further details please see http://www.brta.gov.bd

 Activities of BRTA

  • Controlling and regulating road transport by executing motor vehicle acts, issuing route permits and fixing rates and fares of buses and trucks
  • Conducting regular activities like: Issuing driving license, fitness certificates, registration certificates and Driving Instructor's license
  • Registering schools for motoring
  • Organizing and conducting workshop Seminars for delivering information regarding safe driving and traffic regulations
  • Making research and development for developing ideas and methodologies for safe road transport and traffic system.

BRTA Office Address

Tel / Email

Bangladesh Road Transport Authority (BRTA)

Head Office: “BRTA Bhaban”
Chairmanbari, New Airport Road
Banani, Dhaka-1212, Bangladesh.

Phone: +88-02-55040711
Fax: +88-02-55040712
Email: info@brta.gov.bd


 

Bangladesh Road Transport Corporation (BRTC)

The Bangladesh Road Transport Corporation (BRTC) is the state-owned transport corporation of Bangladesh. It was established under the Government Ordinance No.7 of 1961 dated 4 February 1961. Following the independence of Bangladesh in 1971, it assumed its current name. BRTC is a semi-autonomous corporation under the Ministry of Roads and Bridges. BRTC provides both passenger and cargo transport services.

BRTC operates 3 international bus services (Dhaka to Kolkata, Agartala, and Siliguri in India). Inside Bangladesh, it operates inter-district bus services through its bus depots in Chattogram, Bogura, Cumilla, Pabna, Rangpur, Barisal and Sylhet. It also operates intra-city bus services in many major cities of the country. For transportation of cargo, BRTC operates a fleet of 170 trucks. About twenty percent of the government food transport uses BRTC's trucks. The two main truck depots are located at Dhaka and Chattogram.

BRTC's main driver training institute is located in Joydevpur, Gazipur District, about forty kilometres north of Dhaka. It also has several other training institutes located in Chattogram, Bogura, Khulna, and Jhenaidah. For more details please see: http://www.brtc.gov.bd/

 Activities of BRTC

  • To operate road transport services for both passengers and cargo.
  • To provide safe, reliable and efficient transport service at an affordable fare.
  • To facilitate private sector in transport service and introduction of new routes.
  • To play strategic interventional role at the time of emergency.
  • To provide training facilities for Drivers, Mechanics and in transport management in order to develop skilled manpower in the road transport sector for both home and abroad.
  • To utilize BRTC's land and properties for additional revenue earnings for subsidizing the unprofitable bus routes and services for disabled, women's, students, government employees, poor and destitute etc.
  • To contracting out and sub-contracting the buses to the able private owners so as to promote

competition for quality services and co-existence of the public-private relationship in the road transport sector for greater private sector participation in the operation of BRTC buses.

  • To research vehicle and engine types and safety considerations for bringing harmony in operation of the bus and truck services and to combat the air pollution's factor for better environment.

List of BRTC Officials are as follows:

Name Designation Phone (Office) Email

Mr. Farid Ahmed Bhuiyan (Additional Secretary)

Chairman

02-9554350

Cell: 01817-092917

chairman@brtc.gov.bd

Md. Hamidur Rahman

Director (Admin)

02-9551944

Cell: 01712690335

hamid773@gmail.com

Dr. Nasim Ahmed (Joint Secretary)

Director (Finance)

02-9585909

Cell: 01740-452324

nasim5905@gmail.com

Colonel Md. Mahbubur Rahman

Director (Technical)

02-9557952

Cell: 01743094449

mahbub4029@yahoo.com

Md. Kamrul Islam

General Manager (Admin & Personal)

02-9555807

Cell:  01700565856


Md. Amjad Hossain

General Manager (Accounts)

02-9551985

Cell: 01711038883

amjadpfa@gmail.com

Major Alimur Rahman

General Manager (Technical)

02—9565774

Cell:01914495939

alim5369@gmail.com

Nur-E-Alom

Secretary, BRTC

02-9587355

Cell: 01711-435213

secretary@brtc.gov.bd


BRTC Bus Depots

Sl

Name of Depot

Office

Mobile

1

Motijheel Bus Depot

9333803

01714-293920

2

Joarshara Bus Depot

58951778

01711-302124

3

Kallyanpur Bus Depot

9002531

01818-485388

4

Double Decker Bus Depot

9002395

01711-391514

5

Mohammadpur Bus Depot

-

01734-053991

6

Gabtoli (Utholi) Bus Depot

-

01711-578744

7

 Gazipur Bus Depot

9261443

01711-435213

8

Narayangonj Bus Depot

7646915

01712-187790

9

Norsingdi Bus Depot 

-

01716-473972

10

Cumilla Bus Depot

081-61988

01716-684144

11

Sonapur Bus Depot 

-

01758-880011

12

Chattogram Bus Depot

031-683423

01919-465266

13

Sylhet Bus Depot

-

01717-763820

14

Bogura Bus Depot 

051-66145

01718-700478

15

Pabna Bus Depot

0731-64768

01711-302124

16

Rangpur Bus Depot

0521-64110

01817-782866

17

Khulna Bus Depot

041-786143

01714-240653

18

Barisal Bus Depot

0431-63793

01717-438644

19

Dinajpur Bus Depot

-

01712-382144

BRTC Truck Depot

1

Dhaka Truck Depot

02-9112103

01716-039588

2

Chattogram Truck Depot

031-684058

-

Dhaka Transport Co-ordination Authority (DTCA)

Dhaka Transport Coordination Authority was established on 02 September 2012 to prepare strategic Transport Plan and provide regular supervision and co-ordination for all possible planning for transportation infrastructure development works within Dhaka city and adjacent districts. DTCA jurisdiction covers 7400 Sq km that includes districts of Dhaka, Narayangonj, Munshigonj, Mankgonj, Gazipur and Narsingdi district including Dhaka North City Corporation, Dhaka South City Corporation, Gazipur City Corporation and Narayanganj City Corporation. BTCA is responsible to provide a planned modernized transportation system for greater Dhaka area and Ensure safe, reliable, faster and affordable Public Transport by introducing integrated transport planning.

Objectives and Functions of DTCA

  • To ensure interagency cooperation and coordination in transportation sector
  • To ensure an integrated and planned transportation system formulation
  • To introduce and expand Mass Rapid Transit system
  • To improve traffic management
  • To improve public transport level of service
  • To develop and construct mass transit system as part of an integrated public transport network
  • Design, planning and construction of Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) system
  • Review and modification of the Government approved Strategic Transport Plan (STP) and to provide advice and guidance for other agencies
  • Traffic impact assessment of government or private owned high rise building and any housing project and issue permit for traffic circulation plan
  • Plan, coordinate and approve recommended transport projects of other agencies
  • Route and network planning to develop an efficient public transport network
  • Manage central fare collection and establish and manage clearing house

Road Security

Vehicles without fitness, unskilled drivers, violation of traffic rules, absence of proper road marks and poor maintenance condition of roads, etc. have contributed to an alarming number of road accidents.  Road accidents have become a daily and deadly phenomenon in Bangladesh that has one of the worst crash rates in the world, at more than 60 per 10,000 registered motor vehicles. The official death toll for road traffic accidents is about 4,000 a year. Road safety activists blame shoddy roads, poorly maintained vehicles and reckless drivers for such fatal accidents causing thousands of deaths every year. Research studies show multifaceted causes of road accidents ranging from population explosion, unplanned urbanisation, and tremendous growth of motorised as well as non-motorised vehicles. Improper traffic management is also termed a major cause of road accidents. According to the Bangladesh Jatrikalyaan Samiti's database, 7,397 people were killed in 4,979 road accidents with 16,193 casualties only in 2017. Government intervention to this effect has stopped race of accidents but more pragmatic measures are urgently required.

Road Safety measures taken by the Government

A road redesign project is being implemented through identifying the accident black spots on the national highways. The intensity of road accidents has been reduced due to proper maintenance of road and straightening of road alignment. The ‘Improvement of Black Spots in National Highways’ for the treatment of 121 black spots at an estimated cost of BDT.168.05 crore has been completed during FY2016-17. On the other hand, a vast program for safety on road through overload control by means of installing weighbridge at each important traffic origination point, signing and signaling of roads is under implementation for a long time. In addition, a feasibility report was submitted by the Accident Research Institute (ARI) on accident-prone spots that were identified by the Highway Police to reduce the accidents to a minimum level. The approval process of the project ‘Establishment of necessary sign and road marking on National and Regional Highways and development of dangerous risky corridor in the identified risky areas’ is in progress in order to set up sign and marking at 128 new spots.

At present, a study project to design properly of at 752 intersection points at a cost of BDT.3.24 crore. An investment project will be taken up for the development of intersection points according to the project design.

 Bridges of Bangladesh

All the bridges & tunnels having length of 1500 m or over are looked after by the Bangladesh Bridge Authority (BBA). BBA is an autonomous organization under the Bridges Division with a total manpower 211 staff. the Bridges Division under the Ministry of Road Transport & Bridges was established in March 2008, and has played an important role in the transport sector of the country. As per the Rules of Business, implementation & maintenance of bridges, toll road, flyover, expressway, causeway, ring road etc. have come under the purview of this Division. Head office of BBA is at “Setu Bhaban”, New Airport Road, Banani, Dhaka.

Contact list of important officers of BBA are:

Name Designation Phone (Office) Mobile Email

Khandker Anwarul Islam

Executive Director

+880255040333

01755589048

ed@bba.gov.bd

Md. Rezaul Haider

Director (Administration)

+880255040310

01700716307

dir-admn@bba.gov.bd

Dr. Md.Golam Faruque

Director (Planning & Development)

+880255040312

01715126819

dir-pnd@bba.gov.bd

Quazi Muhammad Ferdous

Director (Tech)

+880255040313

01715102074

dir-tech@bba.gov.bd

MD. Rupam Anwar

Additional Director (Planning & Development)

+880255040340

01700716310

addldir-pnd@bba.gov.bd

Mahmood Ibne Kasem

PS to Executive Director

+880255040320

01700716311

ps@bba.gov.bd

 

Major Bridges in Bangladesh

In recent years, the construction of a number of bridges such as the Bangabandhu Jamuna Bridge, Meghna Bridge, Meghna-Gumti Bridge, Bangladesh-China Friendship Bridge, Shambhuganj Bridge and Mahananda Bridge as been completed. It has established a strategic link between the East and the West of Bangladesh has integrated the country, is generating multifaceted benefits to the people and promoting inter-regional trade. Apart from quick movement of goods and passenger traffic, it is facilitating transmission of electricity and natural gas and has integrated the telecommunication links. 

Major Bridges of Bangladesh are:

Name of Bridges 

Name of Roads

Length (M)

Jamuna Bridge (Under Jamuna Bridge Authority)

Dhaka – Bogura

4800

Lalon shah (Paksey) Bridge

Ishwardi - Kustia Road

1786

Meghna - Gumti (Daud Kandi) Bridge

Dhaka - Chattogram

1408

Khan Jahan Ali (Rupsa) Bridge

Khulna-Mongla/Bagerhat/Gopalgonj

1360

Bangladesh UK Friendship (Bhairab) Bridge

Dhaka – Sylhet

1194

2nd Buriganga Bridge

Dhaka-Gopalgonj

1016

Meghna Bridge

Dhaka - Chattogram

930

Gabkhan Bridge

Barisal - Patuakhali

918

Hajrath Shah Amanath Bridge

Chattogram - Cox's Bazar

914

Ist Bangladesh China Friendship (Postagola) Bridge

Dhaka-Gopalgonj

848

Kaliganga Bridge

Dhaka – Aricha

647

Gorai Bridge

Faridpur – Jashore

630

Karotoa Bridge

Boda – Debigonj

572

Bagabari Bridge

Pabna – Sirajgong

570

Dhaleswari Bridge

Dhaka – Mawa

492

Shambugonj Bridge

Mymensing - Haluaghat

464

Mohananda Bridge

Rajshahi - Nawabgonj

448

Brahmaputra Bridge

Dhaka – Sylhet

443

Bridges under Construction by RHD

Padma Multipurpose Bridge

Dapdapia Bridge

2nd Sitalakhya Bridge

3rd Karnafuly Bridge

3rd Buriganga Bridge

Tista Bridge


Other Ongoing Projects

Feasibility study project for 4 bridge project

International Corridors Leading to Bangladesh

Bangladesh has the potential to become a transport and transshipment center for the sub-region. It borders India and Myanmar and is geographically close to Bhutan, Nepal, and Kunming—the key transportation hub in southwest People’s Republic of China (PRC). With the opening of the Bhangabandhu Bridge over the Jamuna River and the ongoing Padma multipurpose Bridge, the Dhaka–Chattogram transport corridor and other strategic transport corridors can facilitate trade between Bangladesh and the North-Eastern states of India, the Indian state of West Bengal, Bhutan, and Nepal, thereby attracting more foreign and domestic traffic to the country.

South Asia is the least integrated region and the cost of trading across borders is one of the highest in the world. Co-operation with its neighboring countries offers benefits to Bangladeshi owned road, rail and water transport services and port services. Integrating the transport network of South Asia is important to Nepal, Bhutan, and regions such as northeast India as it will end their landlocked or semi-isolated status. Within such a framework, Nepal, Bhutan, and the northeastern region of India would have the benefit of improved access to the ports and important economic centers of the region, and a choice of routes and modes.

Given the large potential for reduction in transportation costs, allowing the landlocked region of North-Eastern India, Bhutan, and Nepal access to Chattogram port through Bangladesh’s eastern border or to Mongla port through its northwestern border has been a key issue among concerned authorities. Defining the corridors, strengthening the systems and facilities at the borders, upgrading the roads / bridges, and bilateral negotiations for agreements will definitely improve the conditions for trucks or containers to exchange cross-border freight wagons.

Road transport has been playing a dominant role carrying bilateral trade between Bangladesh and India. Nearly 70-80% of all overland trade between Bangladesh and India passes through Benapole/Petropole border point. However, the only road connecting Benapole/Petrapole with the Kolkata is still 5.5 meter wide, and highly congested.

In the context of Nepal-Bangladesh, although India has allowed a route (by road) between these two countries across the “Chicken Neck” for bilateral trade, yet goods are required to be transshipped at Banglabandh border point. This route is more than 1300 km long, as such not very cost-effective, consequently very little used. Since this route cannot be used for third country trade, Nepal's export and import traffic uses Kolkata port, which is often congested compared to Bangladesh seaport of Mongla, which has spare capacity and a direct broad-gauge link with Birgunj (Nepal) through Rauxal Indian border point. But for this route and Mongla port to be used for third country trade of Nepal, India has to agree to such transit arrangement.

Asian Highway

The Asian Highway (AH) projects of UN-ESCAP have already identified the major road links among the countries of South Asia. Subsequently, the SAARC Regional Multimodal Study (SRMTS) completed in 2006, also identified a number of routes which could provide efficient regional connectivity. The connectivity to all the 3-hinterland countries/territories should be conceived within the framework of regional economic integration, where all natural and environmental resources, facilities and opportunities should be exploited for the benefit of all countries in the sub-region.

Bangladeshi national highways are all 2-lanes only, but extensively used. These highways were built based on an axle-load limit of 8.2 tons compared to 10.2 tons axle load limit in India, Nepal and Bhutan. India has now adopted 12-ton axle load limits. Most of the trucks used in neighboring countries are usually over-loaded. As such it would not be desirable to allow these overloaded vehicles to move along Bangladeshi road network. Major road networks of Bangladesh, however, needs to be upgraded to expressway standards with higher axle-load limits. 

The SAARC Regional Multimodal Transport Study (SRMTS) recommended a number of routes to strengthen connectivity among the countries and territories of North-Eastern sub-region of South Asia. Out of these, the following routes could be opened immediately to facilitate movement of goods and passengers.

  • Road Route-1: Petrapole Jashore-Dhaka (via ferry) - Sylhet- Tamabil (Indian border) with a link to Agartala.

  • Road route 2: Kathmandu – Kaharvitta – Phulbari – Banglabandha – Mongla/Chattogram  

  • Road route-3: Thimphu – Phuentsholing – Jaigon – Chengrabandha – Burimari – (i) Chattogram (966 km), and/or (ii) Mongla (880 km)


For additional information, please see the following documents: 


Note: The information provided in the attached documents, which has been taken from the old DLCA, does not match the structure of the new LCA and is therefore provided separately.

For contact details, please see the following link: 

4.1 Bangladesh Government Contact List

2.4 Bangladesh Railway Assessment

Bangladesh Railway Assessment

Bangladesh Railway Map

Overview

Bangladesh Railway (BR), the state-run transportation agency of the country, who is responsible for operating and maintenance of 2877.10 Km railway line. For smooth operations the Railway network is divided into 2 regions, Eastern and  Western. Bangladesh Railway (BR) operates and maintains the entire railway network of the country. BR is headed by the Directorate General of Bangladesh Railway under the Ministry of Railways along with Bangladesh Railway Authority (BRA) which works for policy guidance of BR. To upgrade the services of BR, Railway ministry has newly been established as an independent ministry in 2011 separating it from previous Ministry of Communications.

Railway connected almost all important places of 44 civil districts and plays important role in the economy. It operates Total 348 Passenger trains and 6 Container trains & 20-25 goods trains daily. Besides, it operates the largest Inland Container Depot with capacity of 90,000 TEUs. BR network was initially North-South connection based because of riverine land script. Establishment of new East-West connections and missing links and revival of old and abandon tracks are the key areas of interventions.

Rehabilitation of existing railway lines, modernization of signaling system and acquisition of new rolling stocks to improve the performance and to cop up with the upcoming new situation linking the network with the Trans Asian Railway are the important challenges in front of BR. Apart from these, reducing operational bottlenecks by double tracking all major railway corridors and harmonization of railway tracks by phases, institutional reform, pragmatic role in easing traffic congestion by improving commuter train service in Dhaka and Chattogram cities, proper use of land and other assets, introducing more Public Private Partnership (PPP) in railway sub-sector are important challenges in front of BR.

Key features of BR are the coexistence of several gauges, Broad gauge, Meter gauge and Dual gauge, and the separation of the system by the Jamuna River (Brahmaputra) into a Western and Eastern Zone of operations with only one bridge, the 2003 Jamuna Bridge, connecting the two zones.

Bangladesh Railway operates international, inter-city and suburban rail systems on its multi-gauge network. It also owns coach production facilities. BR is divided into two zones, East & West, each under control of a general manager who is accountable to the Director General of Bangladesh Railway. The two zones have their separate departments for operations, maintenance, and finances. Each zone is divided into two divisions that contain departments of HR, Transportation, Commercial, Finance Mechanical, Way and Works Signaling & Telecommunication, Electrical, Medical, etc. Each zone also has its Workshop Divisions, located at Pahartali and Saidpur, respectively. A locomotive workshop is located at Parbatipur for Broad and Meter gauge locomotives.

BR manages its own Railway Training Academy. A separate Directorate under the Ministry of Railways is charged to inspect and ensure different works of BR in relation to safety and Security. For further details please follow https://railway.portal.gov.bd/.


Bangladesh Railway at a Glance

Total Length Railway Line (km)

2,877.10

Total stations

460

Broad Gauge (km)

659.33 

Total locomotives

286

Meter Gauge (km)

1,808.05

Total  coaches

1507

Dual Gauge (km)

409.72

Total wagons

10,226

Railway Bridges

3650

Mail, Express, Commuter &  Demu

132

Track Kilometres

4,093.15

Intercity trains

86

Number of passenger trains daily

341

Maitree Express (Dhaka-Kolkata) and Bondhon Express (Khulna-Kolkata)

05

Number of freight trains daily

37

Local mixed

126

Yearly operating revenue (million BDT)

11,000

Approved Manpower

40,264

Yearly Passengers carried (millions)

70

Yearly Passenger-Kilometres (million)

9,000


BR Network by Corridor

Bangladesh Railway has documented a Master Plan which is aimed to implement by 2045 and this is prepared in conformity to the 7th 5-year plan, vision 2021 1nd 2014. In that plan the Railway network has been organized by key corridors which are listed below:

Corridor 1

Dhaka - Chattogram - Cox's Bazar - Deep sea port

Corridor 2

Chilahati - Ishurdi- Khulna – Mongla

Corridor 3

Dhaka - Bangabandhu Bridge - Darsana/Benapole

Corridor 4A

Dhaka - Bangabandhu Bridge - Rajshahi – Rohanpur

4B

Dhaka - Bangabandhu Bridge - Ishurdi - Parbatipur-Chilahati/Birol 

Corridor 5

Dhaka - Sylhet/Shahbazpur

Corridor 6

Dhaka - Bangabandhu Bridge- Sirajganj / Roypur (Jamtoil) - Burimari

Corridor 7A

Dhaka - Mawa - Bhanga - Jashore - Khulna – Mongla

7B

Dhaka - Mawa - Bhanga - Jashore – Benapole

7C

Dhaka - Mawa - Bhanga – Barishal

7D

Dhaka - Mawa - Bhanga - Kashiani - Gopalganj - Tungipara 

Corridor 8A

Dhaka - Mymensingh - Jamalpur - Tarakandi- Bangabandhu Bridge

8B

Dhaka - Bhairab Bazar – Mymensingh

Corridor 9A

Dhaka - Mawa -Jajira-Rajbari-Moukuri (Mizanpur) - Bara Durgapur (Khas Char) - Pabna – Ishurai

9B

Dhaka - Paturia - Douladia - Moukuri (Mizanpur) - Bara Durgapur (Khas Char) - Pabna – Ishurdi.


Services of BR

Bangladesh Railway provides various types of services ranging from shuttle for university students to freight and cargo service. Following are the important services of BR: 

Passenger Service

Bangladesh Railway is the principal mode of transportation in the country. With the development of road transport facilities there has been a shift in the trend of passenger traffic with short distance passengers preferring road transport, because of their frequent and point to point services. During 2014-2015, about 67 million passengers were transported by Bangladesh Railway against about 65 million during 2013-2014. In order to render better services to the passengers, BR introduced inter-city train services in 1985. At present there are 88 inter-city trains running. Around 40.9% of the total passengers of BR are being carried by the inter-city trains which contribute approximately 83.6 % of the total earning of passenger traffic. To attract the passengers and improve the overall standard of services, BR has introduced different online services along with other developments. At present following services are available on line:

Maitree and Bondhon Express

The Maitree and Bondhon Express are international trains. Maitree Express has been in operation since 2008 linking Dhaka and Kolkata, India while Bondhon Express has linked linking Khulna and Kolkata since 2018.

Freight and Cargo services

The railway has been facing tough competition with other modes of transport for the high rated traffic, which pay more revenue. On the other hand, the railway is called upon to carry traditional low rated essentials. As a national carrier, BR has an obligation to carry essential commodities like food grains, fertilizer, jute, cement, coal, iron and steel, stone & boulders, petroleum products, salt, sugar etc. to the remote corners of the country at a cheaper rate. BR has experienced negative growth in freight traffic in last few decades due to poor services and facilities and dramatic developments in road and river transportation routes. At present the BR has following different types of wagons for carrying freight:

Bogie Cover Wagon (each 34 MT capacity)

250/500

BFCT

450/900

BKh/Hooper

100/200

BKC

120/240

  • Each train can carry 31/62 Containers.
  • Each train carries 30/60 Racks with a total capacity of 1050 MT.

Bangladesh Railway transports containers from Chattogram to Dhaka. Special type flat wagons required for container movement were initially arranged by converting some existing wagons. Subsequently 80 bogie container flats were procured from China and another 100 bogie container flats were procured from India. An Inland Container Depot has been opened at Dhaka with custom and port facilities for clearance of container traffic. Exclusive container trains were introduced on 5 August 1991. Since then, volume of container traffic gained a momentum but BR is yet to catch up with road and water transportation facilities.

At present there is only one Inland Container Depot (ICD) at Kamlapur, Dhaka which is connected by Rail, which is insufficient to carry future loads. At present approximately 75-80 thousand containers are being handled by BR between CPA and ICD Kamlapur. Another ICD is under process of establishment at Dhirasram, north of Tongi and just south of Joydevpur. It will be 264 km only from Chattogram, whereas distance of Kamlapur is 321 km from Chattogram. It is expected that Dhirasram ICD will be able handle 500,000 TEU yearly. Pangaon river port / ICD is running with minimum capacity being underutilized as it is used by few inland ships only who carry containers from Chattogram to Pangaon, but once Padma Bridge is operational, this ICD will be connected by rail and it will be a hub between Dhaka and South Bengal and India through Benapole Land Port.

Container holding capacity

4067 TEUs

Yard area

1 36 954 Sq. m

Container Freight Stations (CFS)

8000 Sq. m

Weighbridge

2 in Two gates

Equipment

Reach Stackers-2 (45 MT), Forklifts-4 (42 MT), Reach Stacker-1 (7 MT), Low Mast Forklift-6 (3 MT), Tractor Trailors-8.

Wagons for container transportation

550

Railway terminal (Length of two tracks)

1097 m

Fire brigade

1 Unit


List of Officers

Name Designation Phone No. Email

Md. Shamsuzzaman

Director General

9561200

dg@railway.gov.bd

Nasir Uddin Ahmed

General Manager (East)

843200

gme@railway.gov.bd

Khandker Shahidul Islam

General Manager (West)

761576

gmw@railway.gov.bd

Md. Anowarul Hoque

Addl. Director General (Infra)

9562051

adgi@railway.gov.bd

Syed Faruk Ahmed

Addl. Director General (RS)

9563450

adgrs@railway.gov.bd

Md. Miah Jahan

Addl. Director General (OP)

9562030

adgop@railway.gov.bd

Chandan Kanti Das

Addl. Director General (M & CP)

9563539

adgmncp@railway.gov.bd

Md. Johurul Islam

Addl. Director General (Finance)

9562047

adgf@railway.gov.bd

Dr. Luthfunnahar Begum

Chief Medical Officer (East)

843165

cmoe@railway.gov.bd

S.A.M. Imtiaz Babul

Chief Medical Officer (West)

776379

cmow@railway.gov.bd

Md. Mizanur Rahman

Chief Mechanical Engineer (East)

843154

cmee@railway.gov.bd

Mrinal Kanti Banik

Chief Mechanical Engineer (West)

761948

cmew@railway.gov.bd

S. M. Murad Hossain

Chief Commercial Manager (East)

2863191

ccme@railway.gov.bd

Farid Ahmed

Controller of Stores

843135

cose@railway.gov.bd

F.M. Mahiuddin

Divisional Superintendent (Workshop)

2566253

dswpht@railway.gov.bd

Md. Burhan Uddin

Divisional Railway Manager, Chattogram

843182

drmctg@railway.gov.bd

A Am Salah Uddin

Divisional Railway Manager, Dhaka

9330522

drmda@railway.gov.bd

A.M.M. Shahnewaj

Chief Commercial Manager (West)

761091

ccmw@railway.gov.bd

Md. Shahidul Islam

Chief Personnel Officer (West)

760594

cpow@railway.gov.bd

Md. Ahsan Ullah Bhyuain

Divisional Railway Manager, Paksey

63496

drmpxc@railway.gov.bd

Md Shofiqur Rahman

Divisional Railway Manager, Lalmonirhat

61353

drmlmh@railway.gov.bd

Md. Joidul Islam

Divisional Superintendent, Saidpur

2136

dswsdp@railway.gov.bd


Station Managers

Station

Phone No.

Station

Phone No

Station Manager - Dhaka

01711691612

Divisional Railway Manager - Dhaka

01711506137

Station Manager - Chattogram

01711691550

Divisional Railway Manager - Chattogram

01711506138

Station Manager - Sylhet

01711691656

Divisional Railway Manager - Paksey

01711506130

Station Superintendent - Rajshahi

01711622728

Divisional Railway Manager - Lalmonirhat

01711506136

Area Operating Manager - ICD / Dhaka

01711691628




Contact Information of Important Railway Stations

Station Name

Phone

Station Name

Phone

Station Name

Phone

Dhaka

02 – 9358634

02 - 8315857

Potia

03035 – 56528

Joypurhat

0571 – 62304

Tejgaon

02 - 9112007

Hathazari

03023 - 2601061

Bogura

051 – 65042

Dhaka Cantonment

02 - 9860761

Shayestaganj

0831 – 56646

Bonarpara

05750 – 64018

Dhaka Airport

02 - 8924239

Sreemangal

08626 – 71350

Gaibandha

05750 – 61338

Tongi

02 - 9801058

Kulaura

08624 – 56004

Rangpur

0521 – 63006

Ghorashal

06254 - 74206

Sylhet

0821 - 716061,

0821 – 713990

Kurigram

0 581 – 61366

Jinardi

30250 - 62046

Habiganj

0831 – 52260

Thakurgaon

0561 – 52097

Bhairab Bazar

9424 - 71477

Kishoreganj

0941 – 55245

Nilphamari

0551 – 61229

Brahmanbaria

0851 - 52006

Mymensingh

091 – 55700

 091 -  55667

Saidpur

05526 – 2104

Ashugonj

08528 - 74221

Jamalpur

0981 – 63040

Kushtia

071 – 53058

Narsingdi

0628 - 62046

Rajshahi

0721 - 774043 0721 – 776040

Kushtia Court

071 – 53065

Akhaura

08522 - 56012

Chapai Nawabganj

0781 – 55205

Rajbari

0641 – 65223

Cumilla

081 - 76358, 081 - 76353

Rohanpur

07823 – 74013

Jashore

0421 – 65019

Chandpur

0841 - 63255

Rajshahi court

0721 – 774122

Benapole

04228 – 75501

Feni

0331 - 74875

Natore

0771 – 66923

Khulna

041 – 760691

Chattogram

031 - 635162, 031 - 616366






Main stations / gauge

Eastern Zone

Western Zone

Khulna

Broad gauge

Birampur

Dhaka Komlapur

Dual gauge

Daulotpur


Phulbari

Dhaka Airport


Phultala


Parbotipur Jn

Dhaka Cantonment


Noapara


Dinajpur

Tongi Junction

Dual Gauge

Jashore Jn

Broad guage

Panchogorh

Joydevpur Junction

Dual gauge

Kotchandpur


Syedpur

Tangail

Dual gauge

Darshana

Broad gauge

Nilphamari

Bongobondhu Setu East

Dual gauge

Alamdanga


Domar

Mymenshingh


Cuadanaga


Chilahati

Jamalpur Junction


Poradoho Jn

Broad gauge

Rangpur

Jogonnatgonj Ghat


Mirpur


Kaunia Jn

Dewangonj


Bheramara


Lalmonirhat

Bahadurabad


Pakshi


Peergacha

Kishorgonj


Ishawrdi jn

Broad gauge

Bamondanga

Mohongonj


Ishawardi Bypass

Dual gauge

Gaibandha

Chattogram

Meter gauge

Abdulpur Junction

Dual Gauge

Bonarpara

Sylhet


Rajshahi


Bogura

Akhaura Junction

Meter auge

Amnura Junction


Chatmohor

B.Baria Junction


Capainababgoinj


Ullapara

Cumilla


Natore


Jamtoil

Luksam Junction


Madhnagar


Sirajgonj Bazar

Nagolkot


Ahsangonj


Sd Monsur Ali

Hassanpur


Shantahar

Dual Gauge

Bongobondhu Setu West

Feni


Akkelpur



Sitakundo


Joypurhat



Pahartali


Pacbibi



Bottali


Hili



Norosingdi


 

Development Progress of BR

Since 2009, Bangladesh Railway has newly constructed 330.15 km of rail lines, 91 station buildings, 295 bridges and converted 248.50 km railway tracks into dual gauge tracks. Furthermore, 1,335.23 km railway track, 644 bridges, 177 station buildings, 430 passenger coaches, 277 wagons have been rehabilitated. To address the shortage of rolling stocks, 20 MG locomotives, 26 BG locomotives, 270 passenger coaches and 20 sets DEMU, 165 BG and 81 MG tank wagons, 270 Flat wagons and 30 Brake vans have been procured.

BR has started to construct double line in the important corridor of Dhaka-Chattogram which is 321 km, of which 118 km is double line.

The government has taken various projects for construction of the broad-gauge double line and for conversion of the meter gauge rail line to dual gauge line under the 1st, 2nd and 3rd LoC (Indian Line of Credit). Besides, two projects for construction of dual gauge rail line parallel to the exting dual gauge line of Ishurdi-Joydebpur section and dual gauge line parallel to existing meter gauge line of Joydevpur-Mymensing-Jamalpur Section have been finalised with the financing of Chinese government.

Furthermore, as a part of long-term planning, BR has prepared a Railway Master Plan with the grant assistance of ADB. The updated Railway Master Plan has been approved by government in January 2018. A total of 230 projects at the cost of BDT.5,53,662 crore have been included in the newly approved Railway Master Plan to be implemented in six phases over the period spanning from July 2016 to June 2045. Some of the High Prioritised Projects of BR are shown below:

Sl

Project Name

Project Cost (BDT)

Phase Period

       1.      

Bangabandhu Railway Bridge Construction

9740

2018-2020

       2.      

Construction of Rail Line from Bhanga Junction (Faridpur) to Payra Port Via Barisal

28335

2018-2020

       3.      

Construction of Akhaura-Agartala Dual gauge railway link

478

2018-2020

       4.      

Conversion of existing MG track to DG track between Akhaura-Sylhet

8619

2018-2020

       5.      

Construction of DG Rail Link from Bogura to Shaheed Monsur Ali Station

6607

2018-2020

       6.      

Construction of double line between Joydebpur and Ishurdi section of BR

7698

2018-2020

      7.     

Construction of a Dual Gauge Rail Line Parallel to the Existing Meter Gauge in Joydebpur- Maymensingh-Jamalpur Section.

7698

0218-2020

       8.      

Modernization of Parbatipur Central Locomotive Workshop

770

2018-2020

       9.      

Construction of new locomotive workshop at Narayanganj

770

2018-2020

10.

Construction of Repair & Maintenance Workshop for DEMU at Narayanganj

963

2018-2020

11.

Reconstruction of Diesel Loco sheds (09 total) including Equipment upgrade and DG Conversion

3500

2018-2020

12. 

Construction of a new Inland Container Depot (ICD) near Dhirasram railway station

1640

2018-2020

13.

Rehabilitation of Jashore-Benapole rail line

1502

2018-2020

 14.   

Procurement of 40 Broad Gauge Locomotives

2070

2018-2020

15.

Procurement of 400 MG & 300 nos BG covered vans (BC) and 180 MG & 120 BG Bogie Open Wagons (BKC) for BR

1140

2018-2020

    16.      

Construction of overpass/flyover in Narayanganj - Joydebpur section of Bangladesh Railway

591

2021-2025

    17.      

Construction of Dhaka- Chattogram High Speed Railway

30995

2021-2025

    18.      

Conversion of existing Metre Gauge double line to Dual Gauge double line between Tongi – Bhairab.

6233

2021-2025

    19.      

Construction of Chattogram CGPY Inter-Modal Terminal

1200

2021-2025

    20.      

Conversion of Metre Gauge double line into Dual Gauge double line between Bhairab Bazar and Akhaura including rebuilding of existing Bhairab and Titas Bridge

3214

2021-2025


Ongoing Projects of BR

After inclusion of railway tracks over the Bangabandhu Bridge, a railway link between East and West Zone has been established. The Government, underscoring the need for railway communication, attaches topmost priority to railway amongst all the surface mode of transports in Vision-2021. A good number of new projects have been approved for the improvement of railway. The projects have already been taken in hand for expansion, upgradation, renovation, conversion and modernisation of railway network. Moreover, rail line rehabilitation, construction of a new ICD at Dhirasram, modernization of Saidpur workshop, modernization of stations, procurement of relief cranes, establishment of load monitoring device in Bangabandhu bridge and on different important places have been undertaken against approved projects. To meet the expectation of the stakeholders necessary steps have been taken for doubling Dhaka- Chattogram railway corridor and introduction of rail communication over the Padma Bridge. Bangladesh signed the “Intergovernmental Agreement on the Trans-Asian Railway (TAR) Network”. Steps have been taken to establish Trans-Asian Railway Network and Regional/sub-regional connectivity in Bangladesh. Moreover, to meet the traffic demand New Express connections have been introduced.

The Government is committed to transform BR into a feasible and market oriented organization with managerial, financial and administrative autonomy to meet its objectives. To prepare this ground, the Asian Development Bank (ADB) supported a Technical Assistance Project which consisted of three phases. Few of the ongoing projects are shown below:

  • Construction of the single line on the Dual gauge track from Duhazari to Cox's Bazar via Ramu and Ramu to Gundum of Myanmar (to be completed by 2022).
  • Construction of railway line from Khulna to Mongla Port (To be completed by 2020).
  • Renovation Work of Bangladesh Railway Kulaura-Shahbazpur sections (To be completed by 2030).
  • Collection of 70-meter gauge diesel electric locomotive for Bangladesh Railway (by 2024).
  • Construction of dual gauge double Line (1st Amendment) in the 3rd and 4th dual gauge line of Dhaka-Tongi section of Bangladesh Railway and Tongi-Jaydebpur sections. (To be completed by 2019).
  • Construction of the double railway line from Akhaura to Laksam and the conversion of existing rail lines into Dual Gauge (To be completed by 2020).
  • Construction of a Dual Gauge rail line parallel to the existing Meter gauge rail lines in Dhaka-Narayanganj section (To be completed by 2020).
  • Rehabilitation and quality improvement of the level crossing gates of the eastern part of Bangladesh Railway (1st Amendment). (To be completed by 2020).
  • Rehabilitation and quality improvement of the level crossing gates of the western region of Bangladesh Railways. (To be completed by 2020).
  • Collection of Meter gauge and Broad-gauge passenger carriage for Bangladesh Railway (To be completed by 2030).
  • Collection of locomotives, relief cranes and locomotive simulators for Bangladesh Railway (To be completed by 2020).
  • Establishment of Padma Bridge Rail Link (1st Amendment) (To be completed by 2024).
  • 200 Meter gauge passenger carriage collection for Bangladesh Railway (To be completed by 2020).
  • Construction of Akhaura-Agartala dual gauge Rail Link (Bangladesh part) (To be completed by 2020).
  • Renovation of Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujib railway Bridge (To be completed by 2020).
  • Collection of 20 Meter gauge locomotive and 150 Meter gauge passenger carriage for Bangladesh Railway (To be completed by 2021).
  • Feasibility review Programme for construction of Circular railway around Dhaka city (To be completed by 2019).
  • Conversion of Meter gauge into Dual Gauge line from Parbatipur to Kownia (To be completed by 2022).
  • Feasibility review of important Western projects (To be completed by 2030).
  • Construction of the Broad-gauge Railway from Madhukhali to Magura city via Kamerkhali (To be completed by 2022).
  • Development of rolling stock operations of Bangladesh Railways (rolling stock collection) (To be completed by 2021).
  • Construction of double line railway at Khulna junction of Bangladesh Railway (To be completed by 2022).
  • Rail line renovation and construction including signalling for Rooppur nuclear power plant.
  • Construction of Broad-gauge railway between Chilahati and Chilahati border with India is aimed at establishing rail connectivity. (To be completed by 2021).
  • Construction of new Dual gauge railway station at Bogura to memoir Shaheed M Mansur Ali (To be completed by 2023).
  • Construction of double line from Joydebpur to Ishhurdi (To be completed by 2024).
  • Feasibility review and detailed design for the railway connection at Sunamganj District headquarter (To be completed by 2020).
  • Conversion of the Meter gauge railway line of the Akhaura-Sylhet segment into dual gauge (To be completed by 2025).
  • Construction of High-speed train line between Dhaka and Chattogram.

 Development as per Master Plan

Phase

No of Projects

Project Value

(In USD millions)

Remarks

Completed Projects

2010-2015 (Existing MP)

25

513.97


Ongoing Projects

2016-2020 (Existing MP)

36

1644.23

Investment Project-29 Ta Projects-07 (24.81)

Phase-I: 2016-2020

76

18696.12

20 Nos Gauge Conversion Projects

39 Nos Rs Related Projects

Phase-Ii: 2021-2025

63

14946.62

Phase-Iii: 2026-2030

30

10744.50

Phase-Iv: 2031-2035

22

12068.85

Phase-V: 2036-2040

12

10300.75

Phase-Vi: 2041-2045

4

1365.00

 

Performance and Constraints of BR

Performance of BR

Fiscal Year

Passenger Km (Million)

Freight Ton Km (Million)

Total operating revenue (BDT. in crore)

Total operating expense (BDT. in crore)

2009-10

7305.00

710.00

673.16

1257.20

2010-11

8051.92

692.64

747.70

1491.82

2011-12

8787.23

582.11

726.42

1567.12

2012-13

8253.00

525.00

804.26

1562.38

2013-14

8135.00

677.35

800.17

1601.69

2014-15

8711.36

693.84

935.45

1808.29

2015-16

9167.18

675.09

904.02

2229.22

2016-17

10040.66

1052.67

130.37

2835.52

2017-18*

10040.66

1052.67

130.37

2835.52


Constraints of BR

Major constraints in rail connectivity are the lack of connectivity between the rail networks, including differences of the rail gauges and incompatibilities in rolling stock. A through link is not available between the main part of India and the north-east states through Bangladesh. India has a three gauge system while Bangladesh has broad gauge and meter gauge (MG) with some dual gauge in the west and MG only in the east. India adopts air-braked rolling stock whereas Bangladesh adopts vacuum based with some air-braked. The key issue is overall deteriorated conditions of rail networks, especially in eastern India and Bangladesh.

The rail network has been neglected for a long time without adequate budget to provide for much needed maintenance and/or improvement. As a result, the infrastructure is generally in poor condition with a number of inadequacies, such as short loop lengths, marshalling yard lines and terminals restricting the ability of locomotives to haul full train loads. Mechanical signaling and track structures further restrict freight train speeds. Apart from about 900 km of main line, lines and crossing loops are in bad condition leading to frequent derailments.

The funding constraints are further compounded with Bangladesh Railways (BR) required to operate extensive passenger services at low fares. This results in insufficient revenue to justify investment, despite the high passenger demand. The priority given to passenger trains also causes delays to freight trains and reduces their competitiveness. This is a particular problem where lines are single track.

The funding problems have been recognized by the Government and in the Bangladesh Railway Investment Program 2007–13 the main agreed projects are duplication of the Tongi-Bharaib Bazaar section, rehabilitation of rail lines, remodeling/rehabilitation of railway stations, signaling and procurement of locomotives and carriages/wagons. In addition, both ADB and the World Bank have assistance programs aimed at improving track and wagon maintenance.

BR rolling stock is poorly maintained and most is overdue for repair or beyond its economic life. BR policy is to move towards air-braked stock, but a considerable amount of unbraked rolling stock remains and this can only be hauled at a slow speed, dramatically reducing effective track capacity. The amount of unbraked stock also limits the number of trains that can use the Jamuna Bridge. Theft of brake blocks and other equipment thwarts attempts to upgrade stock and the generally poor condition of the rolling stock restricts possible train speeds.

While some locomotives are fitted to haul both vacuum and air-braked stock, unavailability of suitable locomotives at Darsana and Benapole has been cited as a reason for limiting the types of wagons used on the international route to vacuum-braked stock. The average turnaround time for Indian wagons bringing goods into Bangladesh is five to six days for an average movement of only 70 km. The turnaround time is considered excessive for this relatively short movement and a source of friction with Indian Railways.

A new dual gauge link between Ishurdi Junction and Dhaka Cantonment station provides a broad gauge (BG) link with India from the outskirts of Dhaka, but restrictions imposed by the Jamuna Multipurpose Bridge Authority (JMBA) to prevent the movement of Indian BG wagons over this bridge. Re-rating the bridge, possibly involving bridge strengthening, is being investigated by ADB but the cost of such strengthening is expected to be quite high. Other options including weighbridges to ensure wagons are within allowable limits have so far been rejected by JMBA.

The route between India through to Myanmar and its northeastern states could be shortened if movement through Bangladesh was negotiated satisfactorily. The main route would be from Darsana to Akhaura or Shahbazpur via Ishurdi and Tongi junction. However, there would need to be the transshipment for freight between BG and MG at some point between Ishurdi and Tongi. However, it is recognized that both countries do not consider such a through route as a priority. 

Security Arrangements of BR

To ensure the property of Bangladesh Railway and to ensure safety and security of the passengers and freight different measures have been adopted. They are:

Government Railway Police (GRP)

Prevention and detection of crime committed against passengers traveling by train and their properties and also maintenance of law and order in the Railway premises are the direct responsibilities of the Railway Police working under the control of National Police Headquarters as well as Ministry of Home Affairs. The general duties of the staff and jurisdiction of Railway Police have been enumerated in the Police Regulation of Bengal 1943. Their duties are:

  • Control of passenger traffic inside the station premises more particularly on the platforms, in the booking office, waiting halls at the entrance and exit gates and wherever specially required on emergency by the station officials.
  • The control of vehicular and other traffic in the station compound.
  • The maintenance of law and order at stations and in standing passengers’ trains, prevention of over crowding
  • Watching loaded passenger trains when standing in the station.
  • The arrest of those found committing nuisances or suffering from infectious disease and keeping the station premises clear of idlers and beggars.
  • The examination of all empty carriages on arrival at terminal station for property left behind by passengers and to see that carriage fittings have not been tampered with:
  • The removal of bodies and persons dying in the train and on station premises and the conveyance to hospital of the sick people.
  • Investigation into cognizable offences committed with railway limits and prevention of the same.
  • The arrest offenders in cognizable cases and detention of them in custody as well as persons arrested by Railway Officers and made over to the police, and their production before the Magistrate.
  • The reporting of non-cognizable case or infringement of bye-laws of the line to proper authorities as also all instances of oppression or fraud on the part of Railway sub-ordinates or others.
  • The prosecution of cognizable case as well as non-cognizable cases under Railway act, 1890 on behalf of the management.

Railway Nirapatta Bahini (RNB)

 Railway Nirapatta Bahini is guided by RNB Ordinance-1976 under the railway administration. The responsibility of providing security to the Railway men, Railway properties and the properties entrusted to it for carrying falls under the duties of Railway Nirapatta Bahini (RNB) Railway Nirapatta Bahini is responsible for:

  • Prevention and detection of crime on the Railway.
  • Protection and safeguarding the Railway properties.
  • Removing any obstruction in the movement of Railway, its properties and the properties entrusted to it for carriage.
  • Escorting of cash movement and protecting pay officers of the railway.
  • Providing security to the goods trains and luggage & Parcel vans of passenger trains.
  • Assisting during Block Check and mobile Court.
  • Eviction of unauthorized occupants in the railway premises, under command of Railway Estate officer/Magistrate.

International Corridors Leading to Bangladesh

Overview

Bangladesh has the potential to become a transport and transshipment center for the sub-region. It borders India and Myanmar and is geographically close to Bhutan, Nepal, and Kunming—the key transportation hub in southwest People’s Republic of China (PRC). With the opening of the Payra Sea port and Padma Bridge, the Dhaka–Chattogram, Dhaka-Mongla and Dkaka-Payra transport corridor and other strategic transport corridors will facilitate trade of Bangladesh India, Myanmar, Bhutan and Nepal including other countries in Asia, thereby attracting more foreign and domestic traffic to the country.

South Asia is the least integrated region and the cost of trading across borders is one of the highest in the world. Co-operation with its neighboring countries offers benefits to Bangladeshi owned road, rail and water transport services and port services. Opening up Chattogram or Mongla Port will earn huge revenue for Bangladesh. Similarly, such benefits could be realized if the Government offer Bhutan, Nepal and the North-East India states, the opportunity to transit through Bangladesh to reach the heartland of India, in exchange for the right of Bangladeshi truck and river vessel operators and Bangladesh Railways to share in this traffic.

Integrating the transport network of South Asia is important to Nepal, Bhutan, and regions such as northeast India as it will end their landlocked or semi-isolated status. Within such a framework, Nepal, Bhutan, and the northeastern region of India would have the benefit of improved access to the ports and important economic centers of the region, and a choice of routes and modes.

Given the large potential for reduction in transportation costs, allowing the landlocked region of North-Eastern India, Bhutan, and Nepal access to Chattogram port through Bangladesh’s eastern border or to Mongla port through its North-Western border has been a key issue among concerned authorities, although no tangible result has been reached yet.

Recent studies proposes 7 corridors for bi-lateral trade between Bangladesh and its neighbors (Northeast India, heartland India, Bhutan and Nepal), as well as for transit allowing each neighbor to shorten circuitous travel today via the ‘chicken neck’ between Northeast India and the rest of India. Such transit can go by road, rail or water. Water and rail transport have a cost advantage for bulks (i.e. most exports), whereas high-value goods (mainly imports) are likely to prefer road. The study lists physical and nonphysical barriers to the development of each corridor and recommends actions and investments that will be needed in the short and medium terms to overcome these barriers.

Cross-border exchanges of railway freight wagons also require agreement on how to keep track of the wagons while they are in ‘foreign’ territory and the relevant charges to be levied. BR wagons do not meet Indian Railways’ standards (notably their brake systems), but IR wagons can operate in Bangladesh; BR would at least earn track use charges from such traffic. The mix of track gauges also complicates things.

Indian freight trains travel only up to the border stations inside Bangladesh and Bangladesh Railway (BR) locomotives then pull the Indian wagons up to a short distance inside the country where transshipment takes place. BR wagons also do not cross the Indian border, as the rolling stock is incompatible with the air-braked stock of Indian Railways. Present load restriction over Jamuna Bridge in Bangladesh prohibits the movement of broad gauge fully loaded wagons across the bridge, although a dual gauge railway network now exists up to Dhaka. Recent investigation, however, revealed that ISO containers on low platform BLCA/BLCB flat cars having a floor height of 1009 mm can be allowed over Jamuna Bridge, without any load restrictions.

Trans-Asian Railway (TAR) through Bangladesh

The dream of connecting Bangladesh to the much- discussed trans-Asian railway network is finally on the way to reality. Bangladesh gov is in the process of infrastructural development for implementation of the railway network to get connected with the Trans Asian Railway. Once the railway network is implemented, Bangladesh will be connected to Myanmar, India, Thailand, China, Vietnam, Singapore, Cambodia and South Korean railway network.  The railway network connecting Bangladesh with the International World is the commercial-Economic Corridor. In particular, Bangladesh is one of the most important trade-economic Partners of China and the possibility of rail communication with Singapore is a landmark in Bangladesh's foreign trade. In accordance with the government 's accepted roadmap, the project has been scheduled to be completed by 2022.  In this connection a new railway network of about 101 kilometres from Dohajari to Cox's Bazar via Ramu and Ramu to Ghundhum of Myanmar is taken for the implementation with priority. At present the Chattogram-Cox's Bazar-Ghundum rail line is now going on and it will be connected with the Trans-Asian Railway Network.

Initially the rail line will connect with neighbouring Myanmar via Ghundum and it will eventually be expanded up to China, Malaysia and Thailand as part of the Trans-Asian Railway Network. The govt has also decided that another project will be undertaken to install rail line connecting Agartala in Tripura, an Indian state, with Bangladesh via Akhaura. Besides, all the disrupted railway routes with India will be revived. Five TAR links have been nominated for Bangladesh.

Focusing on a few strategic routes (see detailed map under) 

The SAARC Regional Multimodal Transport Study (SRMTS) recommended a number of routes to strengthen connectivity among the countries and territories of North-Eastern sub-region of South Asia. Out of these, the following Rail routes could be opened immediately to facilitate movement of goods and passengers:

SAARC Railway Corridors

Following SAARC railway corridors passes through Bangladesh (as per SAARC Regional Railways Agreement):

  • Pakistan-India-Bangladesh-India

Lahore (Pakistan)-Wagah (Pakistan)-Atari (India)-Delhi Kolkata (I)-Gede/Petrapol (I)-Darshana/Benapol (Bangladesh)-Dhaka (Bangladesh)-Shahbazpur (Bangladesh)-Maishashan (India)–Imphal (India).

Lahore (Pakistan) - Wagha (Pakistan) - Atari (India)-Delhi (India)- Kolkata(India)-Gede/Petrapol (India) - Darshana /Benapol (Bangladesh)–Dhaka(Bangladesh)-Akhaura/ Gangasagar (Bangladesh) - Agartala (India)

  • India-Bangladesh

Imphal (India) - Agartala (India) – Akhaura/Gangasagar (Bangladesh) – Chattogram Port (Bangladesh)

  • Nepal-India-Bangladesh

Birgunj (Nepal) – Raxaul (India) - Singhabad (India) - Rohanpur (BD) - Mongla Port/ Chattogram Port (BD)

Biratnagar (Nepal) - Jogbani (India) - Radhikapur (India) - Birol (Bangladesh) -Khulna (BD) - Mongla Port (BD).

Bardibas(Nepal) – Inarwa (Nepal) - Jaynagar (India) - Radhikapur (India) - Birol (Bangladesh) – Khulna (Bangladesh) -Mongla Port (Bangladesh).

  • Bangladesh-Bhutan

Mongla Port/Chattogram Port (Bangladesh) - Chilahati (Bangladesh) - Haldibari (India) – Hasimara (India) - Bhutan.



For information on Bangladesh Railway Network Additional Information, please see the following documents: 

Bangladesh Railway Network Additional Information

Bangladesh Railways additional info

Bangladesh rail map

Note: The information provided in the attached documents, which has been taken from the old DLCA, does not match the structure of the new LCA and is therefore provided separately.

For information on Bangladesh Railway Network contact Information, please see the following link: 

4.9 Bangladesh Railway Company Contact List

2.5 Bangladesh Waterways Assessment



Overview

Bangladesh being a country with many rivers, Inland Water Transport (IWT) is a major mode for the transport of goods and people. IWT is the cheapest mode of transport compared to road or rail. Until recently, however, the sector had received little attention from the Government of Bangladesh with only limited resources allocated to its development. In addition, these resources were mostly used to develop the main routes (the ones most used by large mechanized vessels) while secondary rivers and transport using country boats (mainly rural and until recently non-mechanized vessels constructed in traditional design) were given second priority.

 The total length of rivers in Bangladesh is estimated to be in the range of some 24,000 kilometres, providing a very high degree of penetration. Out of this total, 6,000 kilometres are accessible for movement of modern mechanized vessels during the monsoon season, and out of this, some 3,800 kilometres are navigable around the year. Country boats, in the number of several hundred thousands, are traditional vessels which have been plying inland and coastal waters for hundreds of years and which play a key role as a rural mode of transport of goods and people. Inland ports and other facilities include 11 major inland ports, 23 coastal island ports, 133 launch stations and more than 1,000 minor landing points located in rural areas. 


Length of inland waterways

24,000 km

Length of navigable waterways

Monsoon:  5,968 km

Dry season: 3,865 km

Least available depth range

3.90 m to 1.50 m

Annual water discharge (Source: BWDB)

1400 billion cubic meter

Annual quantum of silt (Source: BWDB)

2.5 billion tons

No. of passenger carried (In year) 

87.80 million

Quantum of cargo carried (In year) 

Total manpower- 1682

58 million tons


During emergencies, there is little probability that it will be used by agencies, being too slow compared to road or helicopter deliveries. Nevertheless at local level, it is probable that many remote areas will – in the initial phases – only be reachable by IWT / coastal sea-trucks.

Navigable River Routes

Both Bangladesh Inland Water Transport Authority (BIWTA) and Corporation (BIWTC) provide pilotage facilities to about 7,000 inland water vessels. They regulate the movement of about 2000 passenger launches and maintains 22 inland ports along with about 800 launch ghats including terminals. Approximate 6000 km Navigable River route is further classified into following 4 categories by BIWTA depending on the drought and clearance:

Class

Minimum Draught

Length & %

Minimum Vertical Clearance

Minimum Horizontal Clearance

Remarks

Class- I

3.66 m

683 km (11%)

18.30 m

76.22 m

Least Available Draft (LAD) of 3.6 m required to be maintained round the year.

Class- II

2.13 m

1000 km (17%)

12.20 m

76.22 m

Links major inland ports or place of economic importance to class I routes

Class –III

1.52 m

1885 km (32%)

7.62 m

30.48 m

Being seasonal in nature, it is not feasible to maintain higher LAD throughout the year

Class –IV

Less than 1.52 m

2400 km (40%)

5.00 m

20.00 m

These are seasonal routes where maintenance of LAD of 1.5m or more in dry season not feasible

Total

5968 km



BIWTC is facilitating passenger and cargo movement in the inland waterways and also offshore islands in the public sector vis-à-vis private sectors. It is operating 35 ferries in different routes. On the other hand, ocean shipping performs 80% of the export-import trade. A WB study reveals that IWT has been the least expensive mode of transport, than that of rail and road. As such, considering the facts of land-man ratio and scarcity of land for further expansion of road networks in the country, IWT sub-sector has given the outmost importance specially dredging various river routes for making them navigable round the year. To develop a balanced and cheap transport system in Bangladesh, it is important to improve IWT both from infrastructure and technological points of view. IWT sub-sector suffers from (i) siltation problem in inland waterways, (ii) day & night navigational problem of waterways, (iii) shortage of passenger & cargo handling facilities including transit shed at river ports, (iv) Presence of manual loading/unloading of cargo at river ports, (v) underdeveloped rural launch landing stations, inadequate number of water crafts both for river and ocean going etc. Moreover, for transportation of containers by inland waterways to and from two seaports, the container handling facilities have not yet been developed. Decades of insufficient investment, and challenged governance Ltd the development of the port sector of the country.

Due to geographical position and topological condition of the country rivers are becoming more and more narrow and thin by siltation. As such, implementation of comprehensive capital dredging program is the biggest challenge for the IWT sub-sector. Specific challenges identified in the sub-sector are: (i) channeling of the existing waterways through massive dredging and procurement of dredgers, (ii) construction of deep sea port to streamline international trade; (iii) improvement of day and night navigation for water crafts by providing navigational aids; and (iv) construction of inland container river port for transportation of containers by waterways to/from sea ports etc.

 Transportation Through Waterways

BIWTA and corporation BIWTC are the 2 main players of the government which keeps the inland waterways navigable and safe for smooth transportation of cargo and passengers. IWT continues to be an important mode of transport not only in the inland movement of freight and passengers but also in the transportation of import and export items through the ports of Chattogram, Mongla, and Payra. The high degree of penetration of the IWT network provides access to about 25% of the rural household in Bangladesh.

IWT has 3 functions with distinct modes of operations and stakeholders:

  • National: This consists of trunk haulage of freight and passenger carriage along the main corridors of demand between the ports and major economic centers (including international). Trips are medium to long distance and high volume movements are recorded. Vessels are modern vessels of large capacity (100 to 1,200 passengers, 20 to 1,800 tons).
  • Local: This consists of feeder, distribution and local traffic. Trips are mostly on short distances with low volume movements to and from (and between) smaller communities. The demand is predominantly for passenger movement but with an important need to accommodate modest freight loads, usually for small enterprise, small-holder or ‘own account’ purposes. Local trips use traditional country boats offering a capacity of up to 100 passengers and 100 tons.
  • Ferries: Ferries link sections of roads separated by large channels in the absence of bridges. Functionally these are an entirely separate category since they are part of the road transport system rather than the IWT system. However, operationally it is sensible to integrate aspects of the ferry services (such as vessel maintenance and repair and river dredging) with those of IWT.

In addition, there exist a dynamic private sector which leads most of the sector activities such as cargo transport, port management and ship building that helps the sector’s contribution to share growth and poverty reduction.

Constraints in waterways system

The inland waterway system is not used to its full potential, due in part to inadequate dredging and shortage of berthing facilities. Tariffs regulated by the Government are insufficient, and as a result boats are overloaded, the cause for more than half of the accidents on waterways. The private sector is more efficient in dredging, and offers a capacity of 6.9 million cubic meters: 2.5 times the capacity of the BIWTA and at lower cost. Improved waterways have the potential to reduce transport costs for bulk cargo and provide better access to areas, such as in the North-West of Bangladesh, where road access is Ltd.

The infrastructure problems on the inland waterways system are significant. Within Bangladesh there is high rate of siltation and bank erosion, and as a result it is difficult for the vessels to navigate along these waterways. Extensive dredging is required to maintain these waterways but unfortunately funds are not available for this work. Major parts of the corridor suffer from navigational hazards, such as shallow water, narrow width of channels and inadequate navigational aids. As a result, night navigation is allowed only on certain sections.

The condition of piers, jetties and other infrastructure in both countries is generally poor. There is a lack of storage facilities; cargo handling equipment and existing support craft such as pilot, mooring and survey boats are in short supply with many of them being unserviceable. The lack of container handling facilities has been cited as a problem. However, it is considered very doubtful whether there will ever be sufficient demand to invest in such specialized facilities.

India has recognized the problem and is taking action to provide new terminals capable of handling containers. Storage facilities are also planned at proposed terminals in India and depending on the utilization of these terminals/routes provision/up-gradation of these facilities could be considered from time to time. If similar facilities are provided in the Bangladesh portion of the protocol routes, it will further enhance utilization of the routes.

The declaration of the Barak River as a National Waterway is also under consideration by the Indian Government. After declaration of this river as a National Waterway, terminal facilities at Bhanga (19 km upstream of Karimganj), and at Badarpur would be taken up by Inland Waterways Authority of India (IWAI).

Between Bangladesh and India there was a bilateral trade agreement signed in October 1980 with a subsequent Protocol on Inland Water Transit and Trade between Bangladesh and India agreed in India in October 1999. It has been updated on a regular monthly basis, but the latest agreement signed in June 2015. The movement of vessels between Bangladesh and India is taking place under the provisions of this protocol. At present Cargo vessels are plying quite in good number but Passenger cruise ships have just completed trial runs twice in this year 2019. Once the above difficulties are overcome, use of the waterways both internal and international will get a through momentum in the near future.

River Ports And Landing Facilities

Infrastructure

A large number of facilities spread all over the country offer various levels of services. About 1,400 sites are designated as facilities for river transport. BIWTA is responsible for construction and maintenance of about half of these facilities which fall into four categories:

  • Main ports built, maintained and regulated by BIWTA. Government Acts designate 19 such ports but only 11 have actually been developed. The infrastructure consists of terminal buildings, pontoons, jetties, gangways and godowns or transit sheds.
  • Landing facilities (Ghats) also built and maintained by BIWTA. 373 sites are designated to have such facilities. Infrastructure consists of pontoons or jetties.
  • Landing points for country boats at about 400 locations under BIWTA's responsibility.
  • Landing sites without more than a wooden plank for passenger and freight embarkation and disembarkation.

Warehouses in main ports are usually built by BIWTA and leased to a port operator or another private entity. A port operator or a private developer may be authorized to build its own warehouse as well as jetties and benefit from a reduced lease fee. Public jetties (101 in 8 main ports) are mostly used for passengers while private jetties (178 in 5 main ports) are used for cargo.

Absence of sufficient mooring facilities (ghats) is considered to be one of the factors negatively affecting safety on rural waterways. BIWTA allocates little resources to landing points for country boats. As a result, local authorities or local associations of boat owners develop additional sites. These sites are rudimentary and often do not represent more than a segment of shore with walking access to land.

The fleet of cargo vessels has significantly changed since 1998-99. Dumb barges of 300 tons on average have been replaced by self-propelled vessels of higher capacity of 500 to 700 tons. The total static capacity has increased by about one third from about 750,000 tons to about 1,000,000 tons. The fleet consists of 2,288 units (2,000 cargo vessels, 118 tankers and 170 bay crossing coasters).

The total capacity offered by the fleet is estimated at 76 million passengers and 35.2 million tons. Operators estimate that passenger vessels accomplish one one-way trip per day. 10 percent of the time is assumed to be spent on docking for repair. Cargo vessels make on average 12 trips per year during a period of 330 days.

Dhaka River Port

Location Details

River/Lake name

 Buriganga 

Latitude (N/S Decimal Degrees)

To the north a line is drawn to the east and west near Ashulia across the Turag river at latitude 23˚-52’-30”N 23.70134

Longitude (E/W Decimal Degrees)

To the south a line is drawn to the north and south across the river Buriganga at longitude 90˚-27’-26”E 90.40403

Capacity

Bulk (MT/month)

General Cargo (MT/month)

Total handling capacity of the port

24.902

10.675

Monthly activity of the port

23.935 

10.257

Potential monthly use by WFP

500

Nil

Monthly use if augmented

600 

400

Most of the bulk cargo discharged at this port consist of bricks, sand, stones and other building material whereas food grains are discharged in bagged form. Dhaka river port also has a fuel depot at Futola. Capacity of this fuel depot is 60.000 MT and Monthly activity is 50.793 MT.


 Vessel Specifications


Nb

Bulk

Conventional

Min (m)

Max (m)

Min (m)

Max (m)

Berths

06 

 -

-

-

-

Anchorages

10 

-

-

-

-

Draught at anchor (metres)


 3,66

3,66

3,66

3,66

Draught at Berth

metres

 3,66

3,66

3,66

3,66

Length Over All

metres

 220

240

220

240

 

Port Cargo Equipment (Operational)

Description 

Quantity

Capacity

Shore Cranes

2 Nos

3 MT

Available Storage (covered)

30 Nos

557,40 m³

Available Storage (open air)

20 acres

81076,35 m³

 

Narayanganj River Port

Location Details

River/Lake name

 Shitalakhya

Port Name

 Narayanganj River Port

Region / District

 Narayanganj

Latitude (N/S Decimal Degrees)

To the north a line is drawn to the east and west near Rupganj/ Murapara across the Shitalakhya river at latitude 23˚-27’-00”N 23,5934

Longitude (E/W Decimal Degrees)

To the south a line is drawn to the north and south near Gopchar across the Shitalakhya river at longitude 90˚-32’-16”E 

90,50996

 

Capacity

Bulk MT/month

General Cargo MT/month

Total handling capacity of the port

55.500

12.500

Monthly activity of the port

46.585

11.750

Current monthly use by WFP

 Nil

Nil

Potential monthly use by WFP

500

Nil

Monthly use if augmented

600 

500

Most of the bulk cargo discharged at this port consist of sand, stones, cement clinker and fly ash whereas food grains are discharged in bagged form. Almost 62% of bulk cargo discharged into this port constitutes fly ash. Narayanganj river port also has a fuel depot at Godnail.

Capacity of this fuel depot is 75.000 MT and Monthly activity is 68.000 MT.

Loading and discharge operations at the port are undertaken by outsourced labour which is available within the port premises. This labour is unorganized unlike at the major sea ports where there is a regulatory authority in the form of Dock Labour Management Board.

Vessel Specifications


Bulk

Conventional

Min (m)

Max (m)

Min (m)

Max (m)

Draught at anchor

 3.66

3.66

3.66

3.66

Draught at Berth

 3.66

3.66

3.66

3.66

Length Over All

 180

220

180

220

 

Port Cargo Equipment (Operational)

 

Quantity

Capacity

Shore Crane

One

2 MT

Vacuvators

Nil

Available Storage (covered)

02 Nos

1400 M³

Available Storage (open air)


 5067,28 M³


Khulna River Port

Location Details

River/Lake name

 Bhairab

Latitude (N/S Decimal Degrees)

To the north a line is drawn east and west across Bhairab river and Mazid Khali nulla at latitude 22˚-25’-45”N

To the south a line is drawn east and west across the Rupsha river at latitude 22˚-46’-40”N 22,86167

Longitude (E/W Decimal Degrees)

89,52446

Capacity

Bulk (MT per month)

General Cargo (MT per month)

Total handling capacity of the port

2500

1700

Monthly activity of the port

2350

1500

Current monthly use by WFP

 Nil

Nil

Potential monthly use by WFP

100

100

Monthly use if augmented

150 

150


Vessel Specifications


Nb

Bulk

Conventional

Min (m)

Max (m)

Min (m)

Max (m)

Berths

04 

 -

-

-

-

Anchorages

06 

-

-

-

-

Draught at anchor

metres

3.66

3.66

3.66

3.66

Draught at Berth

metres

3.66

3.66

3.66

3.66

Length Over All

metres

150

280

150

280


Port Cargo Storage

 

Quantity

Capacity

Available Storage (covered)

Nil

Available Storage (open air)


 278.70 m³

 

Chandpur River Port

Location Details 

River/Lake name

 Dakatia

Latitude

To the west – the part of the Meghna river to the westward of the outfall of Dakatia river which lies east of longitude 90˚-38’-10”E and bonded on the north by latitude 23˚-14’-00”N 23,21502

Longitude 

To the east a line is drawn to the north and south across the Dakatia river at longitude 90˚-40’-20”E 90, 65811 

 

Capacity

Capacity

Bulk (MT/month)

Container (MT/month)

General Cargo (MT/month)

Total handling capacity of the port

6.500

-

6.500

Monthly activity of the port

5.520

-

5.800

Monthly use if augmented

500

Nil

400


Vessel Specifications


Nb

Bulk

Conventional

Min (m)

Max (m)

Min (m)

Max (m)

Berths

03 

 -

-

-

-

Anchorages

05 

-

-

-

-

Draught at anchor

metres

 3,66

3,66

3,66

3,66

Draught at Berth

metres

 3,66

3,66

3,66

3,66

Length Over All

metres

 110

120

110

120


Port Cargo Handling Equipment & Storage

Port Cargo Equipment (Operational)

 

Quantity

Capacity

Mobile Cranes

Nil


Bagging Machines

Nil


Silo Facilities

Nil


Vacuvators

Nil


Available Storage (covered)

Nil


Available Storage (open air)


 92.90 m³


Barisal River Port

Location Details

River/Lake name

 Arialkhan

Port Name

 Barisal River Port

Region / District

 Barisal

Latitude (N/S Decimal Degrees)

To the north a line is drawn to the east and west across Arialkhan river at latitude 20˚-43’-00”N 

To the west a line is drawn to the east and west across the Arialkhan river at latitude 21˚-41’-00”N 22,70028

Longitude (E/W Decimal Degrees)

90,39815


Capacity

Capacity

Bulk (MT/month)

Container (MT/month)

General Cargo (MT/month)

Total handling capacity of the port

11.000

-

10.000

Monthly activity of the port

9.500

-

9.000

Potential monthly use by WFP

500

Nil

300

Monthly use if augmented

600

Nil

400


Vessel Specifications


Nb

Bulk

Conventional

Min (m)

Max (m)

Min (m)

Max (m)

Berths

05

 -

-

-

-

Anchorages

  08 

-

-

-

-

Draught at anchor

Metres

 3.66

 3.66

 3.66

 3.66

Draught at Berth

Metres

 3.66

 3.66

 3.66

 3.66

Length Over All

Metres

 190

200

190

200

Storage capacity

Warehouses in main ports are usually built by BIWTA and leased to a port operator or another private entity. A port operator or a private developer may be authorized to build its own warehouse as well as jetties and benefit from a reduced lease fee. Public jetties (101 in 8 main ports) are mostly used for passengers while private jetties (178 in 5 main ports) are used for cargo.

Agencies responsible for waterways

Total affairs of the Bangladesh waterways are dealt by the Ministry of Shipping. There are 3 authorities responsible for the management of this sector:

Department of Shipping (DOS)

Deals with Safety, Training, Inspection, Registration and implementation of rules, regulations and international conventions.

Bangladesh Inland Water Transport Authority (BIWTA)

Responsible for maintenance and development of waterways.

Bangladesh Inland Water Transport Corporation (BIWTC)

Operates govt components of the IWT i.e. Shipping, Services, etc.

Department of Shipping

Shipping Officers List (DOS, BIWTA Bhaban (8th Floor), 141-143 Motijheel C/A, Dhaka 1000, Bangladesh):

Name

Designation

Contact No.

Email

Commodore Syed Ariful Islam, (TAS), ndc, psc, BN

Director General

Phone (Off): +880 2 9513305

Mobile: 01766685647

Fax:  9587301

dg@dos.gov.bd

Capt. K. M. Jashimuddin Sarker

Chief Nautical Surveyor

Phone (Off): +880 2 9553584

Mobile: 01711333981

cns@dos.gov.bd

Md. Manjurul Kabir

Chief Engineer & Ship Surveyor

Phone (Off): 9550867


Capt. Md. Giashuddin Ahmed

Controller of Maritime Education (Current Charge)

Phone (Off): +880 2 9554206

Mobile: 01716099003

cme@dos.gov.bd

Swe Min Zaw

Director

Phone (Off): +880 2 9551158

Mobile: 01558311039

Fax: 9587301

sweminzaw@gmail.com

Cdr. Md. Shaker, (Retd.) BN

Nautical Surveyor (Maritime Security)

Phone (Off): +880 2 9554206

shaker395@yahoo.com

Md. Badrul Hasan Litom

Deputy Secretary (Executive Magistrate)

Mobile: 01717032088


Mr. Shamim Uddin Ahmed

Deputy Director (R&D)

Phone (Off): +880 2 9552699

Mobile: 01912382787

Fax: 9587301

ddrd@dos.gov.bd

Begum Rezina Begum

Deputy Director (Shipping)

Phone (Off): +880 2 9569625

Fax:  01981910416

coord2@dos.gov.bd

Mr. Md. Shamsher Ali Khan

Statistical Officer

Phone (Off): +880 2 9567468

Mobile: 01916747582

so@dos.gov.bd

Mr. Shariful Islam

Chemist

Phone (Off): +880 2 9567468

Mobile: 01712574888

chem@dos.gov.bd

Mr. Md. Shafiqur Rahman

Chief Inspector

Phone (Off): +880 2 9558560

Mobile: 01711935196

ci@dos.gov.bd

Begum Parvin Sultana

Prosecuting Officer

Phone (Off): +880 2 9569625

Mobile: 01712885629

po@dos.gov.bd

Mr. Yasinul Azam

Accounts Officer

Phone (Off): +880 2 9553577

Mobile: 01831979394

ao@dos.gov.bd

Mithun Kumar Chaki

Co Ordinator

Phone (Off): 9513305

Mobile: 01817088366

Fax: 9587301

mithucha@yahoo.com


Responsibilities of DOS  

  • Administration of the Merchant Shipping Act, 1983 and the Inland Shipping Ordinance, 1976 and rules there under, including:
    • Registration and survey of ships and issue of certificate of registry and certificate of survey
    • Training of Marine officers and Engineers
    • Inspection of ships
    • Safety of lives and ships at sea and in inland waters and implementation of Rules, Regulations and International Conventions relating to these matters
    • Implementation of Rules and Regulations relating to dangerous cargo
    • Shipping accidents/casualties
  • Development and maintenance of light houses and navigation aids
  • Monitoring of I.W.T. vessels (including coaters) connected with carriage of export and import cargoes for synchronizing with arrival and departure of ocean-going ships and for efficient utilization of vessels
  • Transport co-ordination with different agencies for removing congestion at port of entry and ensuring speedy up-country movement of cargo
  • Matters relating to chartering of vessels in respect of bulk cargo by various agencies of the Government
  • Freight rates of shipping lines and freight study for the purposes, including Economic Statistics for shipping
  • Operational matters pertaining to implementation of shipping agreements
  • All technical and operational matters relating to shipping including those of Bangladesh Shipping Corporation which are referred by the Government
  • Regulation of routes and cargo in respect of private sector ships
  • Co-ordination with Shipper's Council and Shipping Lines, Shipping Agents and Shippers

Bangladesh Inland Water Transport Authority

BIWTA was created to set up an authority for development, maintenance and control of inland water transport and of certain inland navigable waterways. An advisory committee have subsequently been constituted to advise the authority in respect of all matters related to development, maintenance and operation of inland water transport and of inland waterways in Bangladesh.

Bangladesh has about 24,000 km of rivers, streams and canals that together cover about 7% of the country's surface. Most part of the country is linked by a complex network of waterways which reaches its extensive size in the monsoon period. The IWT sector carries over 50% of all arterial freight traffic and one quarter of all passenger traffic. For further details please look into: http://www.biwta.gov.bd/

BIWTA Head Office: 141-143 Motijheel C/A, Dhaka-1000, Bangladesh.

Telephone +88-02-9564634,

Fax +88-02- 9551072, E-mail- info@biwta.gov.bd


List of BIWTA Officers

Name

Designation

Contact No

Commodore Mohammad Mahbub-ul Islam

Chairman

01968390000

Mohammad Selim Sheikh

Coordination Officer

(Chairman's Office)

01933816502

01968390001

Mr. Md. Delwar Hossain

Member (Planning & Management)

01968390004

Mr. Md. Ghulam Mostafa

Member (Engineering)

01968390002

Mr. Md. Nurul Alam

Member (Finance)

01968390003

Mr. Kazi Wakil Nawaz

Secretary BIWTA

01715001164

01968390005

Mr. Md Abdul Awal

Director (Accounting Department)

01713453211

01968390008

Mr. Md. Abdul Matin

Chief Engineer (Dredging)

01551229977

01968390007

Mr. Gopal Chandra Saha

Director, (finance)

01712256768

01968390013

Mr. Mohammad Siddiqur Rahman

Director (Audits)

01713076564

01968390009

Mr. Md. Shahjahan

Director (Department of Naval Conservation and Management)

01716026704

01968390018

Mr. Hassan Mahmood Tareq

Chief Engineer (Marine)

(MME Department)

01819239727

01968390006

Mr. Md. Mohidul Islam

Chief Engineer

01711269706

01968390015

Mr. Javed Anwar

Director (in charge) (Planning Department)

01713034638

01968390012

Dr. Yadav Chandra Devanath

Head doctor (Medical Department)

01556346840

01968390017

Mr. Md. Shafiqul Haque

Director (Department of Ports and Transport)

01733583359

01968390011

Mr. Mofizur Rahman

Director (Purchase and Conservation Department)

01711733835

01968390010

Mr. Samson Nahar

Director (ongoing duty)

Hydrography Department

01968390014

Mr. Rakibul Islam Talukdar

Director ICT (additional responsibility)

+880-2-9550870

+880-2-47110850

Mr. Muhammad Abu Jafar Howlader

Director Naval Division

01712096780

01968390019


Responsibilities of BIWTA 

  • Carry out river conservancy works including river training works for navigational purposes and for provision of aids to navigation including marks, buoys, lights and semaphore signals. Disseminate navigational and meteorological information including publication of river charts;
  • Provided pilotage and hydrographic survey services.
  • Draw up programmers of dredging requirements and priorities for efficient maintenance of existing navigable waterways and for resuscitation of dead or dying rivers, channels, or canals, including development of new channels and canals for navigation.
  • Develop, maintain and operate inland river ports, landing/ferry ghats and terminal facilities in such ports or ghats.
  • Carry out removal of wrecks and obstruction in inland navigable waterways.
  • Conduct traffic surveys to establish passenger and cargo requirements on the main rivers, feeders and creek routes.
  • Develop rural water transport by progressing of schemes for modernizing and mechanizing country craft.
  • Ensure co-ordination of Inland Water Transport with other forms of transport, with major sea ports, and with trade and agricultural interests for the optimum utilization of the available transport capacity.
  • Conduct research in matters relating to Inland Water Transport including development of
  • Craft design Technique of towage
  • Landing and terminal facilities
  • Port installations
  • Arrange programmes of technical training for Inland Water Transport personnel.
  • Maintain liaison with the shipyard and ship repair industry to meet the requirements of the Inland Water Transport fleet repairs and new constructions.
  • Maintain liaison with the Government and facilitate import of repair materials for the Inland Water
  • Transport Industry.
  • Prepare plans or schemes for carrying out any of the above mentioned functions.

Establishment / Service Centre

  • Inland River ports - 22 (Dhaka, Narayanganj, Barisal, Chandpur, Khulna, Baghabari, Potuakhali, Narsingdi, Aricha, Nagarbari, Daulatdia) and 11 newely gazatted (Tongi, Mawya, Char-Janajat, Ashuganj-Bhairab Bazar, Bhola, Bargona, Nawyapara, Munshigonj, Chatak, Meghna Ghat, Cox's Bazar).
  • Secondary riverine station (Developed) – 448.
  • Landing points (without infrastructure) – 374
  • Coastal Station - 23.
  • Ferry terminals Nos. - 08.
  • Field offices - 25.
  • Pilot Stations - 24 (Chattogram, Ramgoti, Barishal, Chandpur, Naryangonj, Natua Para, Madaripur, Kowkhali, Mongla, Khulna, Angtihara, Maowa, Aricha, Kawlia, Sirajgonj, Kazipur, Bahadurabad, Chilmari, Dai-Khawa, Patuakhali, Bhuirab Bazar, Lipsa, Paturia, Badder Bazar.)
  • Annual passengers carried - 50 million
  • of existing Dredgers - 7 nos.
  • Inland survey and inspection vessels - 81 nos.
  • Pontoon and barge - 410 nos.
  • Differential Global Positioning Systems (DGPS) Stations - 5 nos.(Name of Station & Address) 

BIWTA Emergency Hot Line Numbers

BIWTA Hot – Line: 01400 – 150150

Sadarghat Hot – Line: 01304004003, 01304004006

Sl. No

Office

Phone No.

1

Control Room (Dhaka)

02 – 9582306

2

Dhaka River port (Sadarghat)

029559898

3

Narayanganj River Port

01959999228, 027631003

4

Chandpur River Port

01718810014

5

Barisal River Port

01911051189, 043161449

6

Potuakhali River Port

01722046862, 0441-62340

7

Chattogram office

01819520347

8

Cox’s Bazar River Port

01819520347

9

Khulna River Port

01715728929, 041 - 721929

10

Aricha River Port

01717006104

11

Shimulia River Port

01688601679

12

Baghabari River Port

01711934694

13

Bhola River Port

01717800008

14

Borguna River Port

01678142254

15

Ashuganj River Port

01718105000, 01718304898


Bangladesh Inland Water Transport Corporation

Bangladesh Inland Water Transport corporation (BIWTC) is an apex body under the Ministry of Shipping. BIWTC is a commercial water transportation institution of the government which is responsible for the overall development of the water transportation system in Bangladesh. The corporation is headed by a Chairman. It started the journey in 1972 merging a gov and 9 other private organization with a fleet of 611 ships and craft of different category. At present BIWTC is operating approximately 200 Commercial and Auxiliary vessels. For details pl look into: http://www.biwtc.gov.bd/

List of BIWTC Officers

Name & Designation

Contact No.

Email

Pranay Kanti Biswas

Chairman (Addl. Secretary)

Phone (Off): 02-9673671, 9635236

chairman@biwtc.gov.bd

Syed Md. Tajul Islam
Director (Admin), (Additional Secretary)

Phone (Off): 02-9670013, 9634793/212(PA)

Mobile: 01711959397

da@biwtc.gov.bd

Md. Rashedul Islam Director (Technical) (Joint Secretary)

Phone (Off): 02-9635124, 02-9673684/214

Mobile: 01718-543366

td@biwtc.gov.bd

Md. Rashedul Islam Director (Technical) (Joint Secretary)

Phone (Off): 02-9635124, 02-9673684/214.

Mobile: 01718-543366

td@biwtc.gov.bd

Shahinur Bhuiyan Director (Finance)

Phone (Off): 02-9634958, 9673107/213

fd@biwtc.gov.bd

N. S. M. Shahadat Ali Director (Commerce) 
Current Charge

Phone (Off): 02-9634920

Fax: 88-02-9634976

cd@biwtc.gov.bd 

Bipul Chandra Biswas, Secretary

Phone (Off): 02-9634876/216

Mobile: 01712139713

secretary@biwtc.gov.bd

Capt. Showkat Sardar, General Manager (Marine)

Phone (Off): 02-9635342/220

Mobile: 01711-602622

gmm@biwtc.gov.bd

Sheik Md. Nasim GM (Commerce), (Passenger & Admin.)

Phone (Off): 02-9634272/223

Mobile: 01715016751

gmcc@biwtc.gov.bd

S M Ashikuzzaman GM (Commerce), (Cargo & Ferry)

Phone (Off): 02-9634839/231

Mobile: 01711868069

gmcpf@biwtc.gov.bd

Abdur Rahim Talukder Chief Engineer

Phone (Off): 02-9635240/239

Mobile: 01711-175922

gme@biwtc.gov.bd

Md. Abul Kalam Azad Chief Audit Officer

Phone (Off): 02-9635410/263

Mobile: 01720422008

cao@biwtc.gov.bd

Jesmin Ara Begum Chief Planning Manager (Planning Dept.)

Phone (Off): 02-9634691/221

Mobile: 01734733857

cplm@biwtc.gov.bd


Functions of BIWTC

BIWTC is the operational branch - service oriented commercial organization. Since its creation, it has been playing a vital role in the inland and coastal water ways by carrying of passengers, cargo and vehicles. The functions of BIWTC are as follows:

  • To provide services for safe transportation of passenger and cargo in inland and coastal water ways.
  • To provide services for transportation of vehicles in the waterways.
  • To operate safe transport services for transportation of passenger and cargo between mainland and off-shore islands, where thousands of people are living.
  • To provide services in the uneconomic routes as Public Service Obligation (PSO).
  • To provide any other emergency services at time of national needs.
  • To maintain dockyard and repair yard for repair and renovation of vessels engaged in the above mentioned activities.

With the aim of transforming BIWTC into a commercially viable organization, in accordance with the strategic plan of the IDA proposed IWT-III project the BIWTC has been transformed into unit basis organization and it is performing its activities with the following units:

  • Ferry Service Unit.
  • Passenger Service Unit.
  • Cargo Service Unit.
  • Ship Repair Service Unit

BIWTC Services

Ferry Service Unit

BIWTC is providing day/night ferry services in the following routes to connect Northern and Southern regions with the Eastern region of the country by bridging the road gaps.

Name of Routes/Services

1

Paturia

Kazirhat

3 km

2

Paturia

Daulatdia

19 km

3

Mawa

Charjanajat

13 km

4

Bhola

Laxmipur

28 km

5

Laharhat

Vaduria

-

6

Chandpur

Shariatpur

10 km

7

Charkaipur

Kalipur Bazar

-

The above ferry services are being operated by different categories of self-propelled and dumb ferries including Ro-Ro ferries. The particulars of vessels engaged under this unit are as follows:

Type of vessel

No. Of Commercial vessel

No. Of Auxiliary vessel

Total vessel

Small Ferry

3

-

3

Medium Ferry

4

-

4

K-Type Ferry

8

-

8

Ro-Ro Ferry

12

-

12

Dumb Ferry

8

-

8

Sub-Total

35

9

44

Tug (auxiliary vessel)

12

-

12

Total

47

9

56


BIWTC Ferry Routes & Per Vehicle Rate

Vehicles Rate

Paturia- Dawladia

Paturia-  Kazirhat

Mowa-  Charjanajat

Chandpur-  Shariatpur

Bhola-Laxmipur

Lahar Hat-Veduria

Charkalipur- Kalipur Bazar

Up to 1 Ton Loaded Truck or Empty

700

860

800

920

1450

920

280

1 Ton to 3 Ton Tuck /Van/ Lorry-Loaded or Empty

740

920

980

980

1750

980

320

3 Ton to 5 Ton Tuck /Van/ Lorry-Loaded or Empty

880

1040

1080

1080

1800

1080

450

5 Ton to 8 Ton Tuck /Covered Van/ Lorry-Loaded or Empty

1060

1320

1400

1400

2300

1400

450

8 Ton to 11 Ton Tuck /Covered Van/ Lorry-Loaded or Empty

1460

1920

1850

1850

3000

1850

550

11 Ton to 30 Ton Tuck /Covered Van/ Lorry-Loaded or Empty

2980

3710

3940

3940

6500

2670

1125

29'-5" X 7'-5" to 34'-5" X 8'-5" Tank/Lorry or above size

1460

1920

1850

1850

3050

1850

550

Mini Bus/Coaster up to 22’-6”

650

970

950

950

2000

950

350

Medium Bus/Coach up to29’X 7’

1150

1350

1350

1350

2800

1350

450

29'-5" X 7'-5" to 34'-5" X 8'-5" Bus/Coach Empty

1460

1520

1580

1700

3000

1700

550

Microbus / Ambulance Tempo / Human Holler

800

970

860

1000

1600

1000

300

Pick-UP (1000kg) / Station Wagon / Prado / Nissan / Luxury Jeep (petrol)

730

860

800

920

1450

920

280

Car/Jeep/Tempo Trailer with/without Jeep or Truck

450

550

500

680

850

680

250

Baby Taxi / CNG/Van / Auto Rickshaw without Passenger

200

280

270

270

450

270

60

Motor Cycle without Passenger

70

100

70

70

150

70

30

By-cycle without Passenger

40

60

40

40

80

40

20

Rickshaw/Van
Goods Per Bag(40kg)
Per Buffalo/Cow
Per Goat/Sheep

--

-

-
-
-
-

-
-

-
-
-

-
-
-
-

60.00
41.00
60.00
20.00



Coastal Services Time Table

Shipping time

Time to reach the ship

Station

Time

Station

Time

Chattogram

09:00

Hatiya

15:30

Guptachara

09:00

Kumira

11:30

Kumira

14:00

Guptachara

15:45

Hatiya

11:00

Boyarchar

12:30

Boyarchar

13:00

Hatiya

14:30

Manpura

11:00

Shashiganj

12:30

Shashiganj

13:00

Manpura

15:30

Charchanga

09:00

Boyarchar

10:00

Boyarchar

13:00

Charchanga

15:00

Majchudhuri Hat

05:00

Barisal 

11:00

Mirzakalu

10:00

Alekjander

09-00

Eilisha

09:00

Majchudhuri Hat

12:00

Barisal

07:00

Majchudhuri Hat

11:45

Majchudhuri Hat

12:00

Barisal

17:15

 

Passenger Service Unit

BIWTC is responsible for operation of passenger services both in inland water routes and in the coastal areas & off-shore islands of the country. Those off-shore islands are inhabited by crores of people & are also growing populous day by day. Waterways are the only communication media for the people of the region for carrying out their day-to-day socio-economic activities. But till to day no proper passenger service could have been opened in the area by the private sector. As such the responsibility for operation of the passenger vessels in the region has been vested upon with BIWTC for a long time on behalf of the Government as a Public Service Obligation (PSO). Passenger Service Unit is mainly engaged in carrying passengers in the inland waterways, coastal areas and off-shore islands.


 Passenger transport capacity

No of passenger carried (In a year) : Approx 87.80 million

Type of vessel

No. Of Commercial vessel

No. Of Auxiliary vessel

Total vessel

Paddle Steamer

4

13

17

Other vessel

24

0

24

Total

28

13

41


Cargo Service Unit

Cargo Service Unit of BIWTC is mainly responsible for carrying of various kinds of commodities like food, food grains, Jute & jute goods cement, clinker, fuel and petroleum products from Chattogram and Mongla Port to different inland river ports of the country. In addition, cargo vessels also send to Kolkata (India) port under the Inter country transit and trade protocol agreement between the two countries. These commodities are transported by the Coasters, Tankers and barges of the Unit. The vessel position under Cargo Service Unit are:

Type of vessel

Total

Type of vessel

Total

Coaster

14

Bay Crossing & Inland Barge

21

Tanker

12

Bay Crossing & Inland Tug

09

Self-Propelled Barge

10

Other Auxilliary

18

Total Vessels: 84


Cargo transport capacity

Quantum of cargo carried (In year) 58 million MT.

Type of vessel

Commercial vessel

Auxiliary vessel

Total vessel

Coaster

14

-

14

Tanker

12

-

12

Self-Propelled Barge

10

-

10

Bay Crossing & Inland Barge

21

-

21

Bay Crossing & Inland Tug

09

-

09

Others

-

18

18

Total

66

18

84

 

Ship Repair Service Unit

Under Ship Repair Service Unit there are 4 dockyards and one Floating Dock located at Narayanganj for repair and maintenance of Corporation's own vessels. To make the dockyard a profit centre, steps have been taken to undertake repair works of private vessels also. For attending emergency repair works, facilities are also available  different locations at Aricha, Mawa, Khulna, Barisal, Chattogram and Chandpur with reasonable expertise.

It may be mentioned here that there is a fibreglass factory under this Unit which produces products such as speed boats, hull, helmet, chair and various type of house hold furniture. Total 14 auxiliary vessels are placed under this Unit for smooth functioning of its normal works.

 

Stations & Ghats of BIWTC

BIWTC has 44 Stations and ghats for operation of its services under Ferry Service Unit, Passenger Service Unit and Cargo Service Unit. The names of the stations and ghats are as follows:

Paturia

Kumira

Barisal

Harinaghat (Chandpur)

Kazirhat

Maitbhanga

Shariatpur

 DaulaBDThan

Daulatdia

Guptachara

Charchenga

 Char Bata

Mawa

Manpura

Majuchowdhury Hat

 Kowkhali

Char Janajat

Shashiganj

Kathalbari

 Jhalakati

Narayanganj Terminal-1, 2

Daulatpur

Teknaf

Sandwip

Narayanganj Terminal-3

Khulna Ghat

St. Martin

Hatiya

Dhaka Ghat

Delta Ghat, Khulna

Morrelgonj

Char Khali

Chandpur

Mongla

Bara Mashua

Hularhat

Chattogram Terminal-1

Chattogram Terminal-2



 

Comparison of Cargo Tariff among Waterways, Road and Rail

IWT tariffs for cargo are below BDT 1 per ton-km whereas for road they are around BDT 4.5. Rail tariffs range between BDT 2.5 and 4. Even after adding to IWT and rail tariffs the cost of handling at the port/railway station and terminal transport between the port/railway station and the origin/final destination, IWT still remains the cheaper mode of transport. For example between Dhaka and Chattogram, the tariff to transport a 20-foot container is around BDT 600 per ton by IWT, compared to BDT 1,200 for rail and BDT 6,000 for road

Main inland waterways

Name of Routes/Services: Inland : Dhaka-Khulna Rocket Service

Coastal :

  1. Chattogram-Barisal Steamer Service
  2. Chattogram-Hatiya Steamer Service
  3. DaulaBDThan - Char Alexander Sea-truck Service
  4. Kumira-Guptachara LCT Serivce
  5. Hatiya-Char Bata Sea-truck Service
  6. Char Changa-Char Bata Sea-truck Service
  7. Manpura-Shashiganj Sea-truck Service.
  8. Barisal-Mozuchowdhuryhat Sea-truck Service.
  9. Kaliya-Nazirpur Sea-truck Service.
  10. Alexander-Mirjakalu Sea-truck Service.
  11. Teknaf-Sent Martin Tourist Sea-truck Service.

International Container Terminal (ICT) and Container Shipping Services

Coastal shipping for containers is developed mainly for imports from Chattogram Port (NCT) to the river ports near Dhaka. The number of containers carried by coastal shipping is approx. 26,000 TEUs yearly, which is only 1 % in 2.67 million TEUs of the total throughput of Chattogram Port. Currently 2 river ports are in operation; Pangaon ICT with 116,000 TEU capacity per annum and Ashugonj Riverport/ICT with a capacity of 4,00,000 TEUs (on completion of full construction). There is a private River Port/ICT also operating i.e. Summit Alliance (SAPL) with 100,000 TEU capacity per annum. In addition, 2 river ports are under construction; Rupayan Port & Logistic Services Ltd. (300,000 TEU capacity) and AK Khan Container Terminal (250,000 TEU). 2 more river ports are planned to be constructed; Kumudini Container Terminal (150,000 TEU capacity), and Ananda Container Port (400,000 TEU capacity). Locations of the river ports are illustrated together with the railway ICDs in the map

Pangaon ICT/River Port

Pangaon is an International Container Terminal and inland river port on the bank of River Buriganga  in Dhaka, Bangladesh. It serves as a cargo port for Bangladesh's capital and largest city Dhaka. It was opened in 2013. It is the first river port of its kind in Bangladesh. The port is located at the Dhaka Metropolitan Area in Keraniganj Upazila, which is an industrial suburb.

Bangladesh Inland Water Transport Authority (BIWTA) and the Chattogram Port Authority (CPA) jointly built this inland terminal at a cost of BDT 1.54 bn. The terminal is expected to play a positive role in the country’s economic development by opening a new horizon in the transportation of exported and imported goods through waterways. The project aims to help ease the pressure of cargo movement on the Dhaka-Chattogram railway and highway corridors.

Facilities of the Port/Yard:

Storage capacity

3,500 -20-foot equivalent units (TEUs) in its 55,000-sq mtr container yard

Handling Capacity

116,000 TEU annually

CFS

5815 Sq m

Jetty

The port has a 180-meter-long and 26-meter-wide jetty which can handle two ships of 70 to 75 meters at berth simultaneously

Equipment

v  One mobile harbor crane

v  Two straddle carriers

v  Two tractor trailers

v  Three cargo-lifting cranes

v  Nine Forklifts

v  One Weigh Bridge


When the port was opened, the chief shipping route was between Dhaka and Chattogram port. In February 2017, the first Indian ship from Kolkata docked at the port. In July 2017, China and Bangladesh signed an agreement to allow vessels to travel to the port. Coastal shipping agreements allow foreign vessels to directly carry cargo to Bangladeshi ports, instead of using Singapore or Colombo for transhipment.

 Ashugonj ICT/ River Port

The Port of Ashuganj is a notable river port in eastern Bangladesh. It is one of the important industrial ports of the Bengal delta. It is located on the Meghna River. The port is a regional transhipment centre in Eastern South Asia. It is located 28 km from Brahmanbaria town and 43 km from the Akhaura land border between Bangladesh and India. The port is located in an industrial area in the vicinity of the Ashuganj Power Station, a 1777 megawatt thermal power plant which is one of the largest in Bangladesh. The port is also the terminal for a large fertilizer and chemical plant; as well as smaller power plants. It hosts several warehouses and shipyards. Its industrial units receive gas supplies from the nearby Titas Gas field.

Ashuganj port acts as a port of call for cargo shipments to the nearby Indian state of Tripura. Cargo unloaded in Ashuganj port is transported by road to the Akhaura-Agartala land border; and vice versa. The transhipment route allows access for several Indian states, including Mizoram, Manipur, Nagaland and Lower Assam.

An International Container Terminal (ICT) is under-construction at Ashuganj Port with an estimated cost of BDT 12.93 billion. Out of the BDT 12.93 billion project cost, Bangladesh government will fund BDT 8.62 billion while the rest BDT 4.31 billion will come from the Indian 2nd Line of Credit (LoC). Bangladesh Inland Water Transport Authority (BIWTA) under the Ministry of Shipping will implement the project December 2021. If the project is implemented the new horizon will start in the shipping container transport through the river. It will be beneficial to Bangladesh financially and commercially.

This port provides the facility of loading and unloading of goods of the river vessels. According to the initial survey, it will be possible to transport around 0.4 million twenty feet equivalent units (TEUs) of containers on this route every year.

Summit Alliance Port Ltd

To support the Off-dock facilities of the govt Private entrepreneurs have also been asked to come forward. Attending that call of the govt Summit Group has developed a river port/Container yard named Summit Alliance Port Ltd. SAPL has established an Inland Container Terminal (ICT), the first of its kind in the country’s private sector, on 15 acres of Company’s freehold land on the bank of river Dhaleshwari in Muktarpur under Munshiganj district. The Inland Container Depot comprising transportation and storage of empty containers and redelivery of the containers to various locations as per client’s advice.

The River Terminal, being similar in certain respects to the Off-Dock establishment, shall have the bonded warehouse facilities with required handling equipment for Container Freight Station to handle export and import cargos as well as for storage of empty containers. In addition, the company provides container vessels for transportation of cargo to and from Chattogram Port. At Chattogram the company has three separate bonded depots on approx. 44 acre freehold land in Patenga, located 6.50 km away from the multipurpose container vessel berths of Chattogram Port, with facilities to provide both ICD and CFS services as detailed below:

  • Total covered space of 511,000 sft including 7,020 sft for specialized Garments on Hanger (GOH), with 11 separate Warehouse spread over our three depots for storage of export cargo before stuffing and transportation of the same after completing Customs and other formalities.
  • Import Warehouse of 19,500sft to handle import cargo
  • Jute Warehouse measuring 8,430 sft
  • ICD facility for storage of approx. 6,000 empty containers (at any point of time) with developed yard area of over 1.50 million sft.
  • Plug-points for simultaneously handling 100 Refrigerated (Reefer) containers
  • Fleet of heavy and light equipment’s including, amongst others, Laden Reach Stackers, Cranes, High & Low Mast Forklifts of various capacities, Empty Reach Stackers, Side Stackers Cargo Lifts, Trailers, Prime Movers and other handling equipment’s like hand-trolleys etc.
  • Three Standby generators of 550 KVA, 320 KVA and 220 KVA capacities for supplying power to the entire yard and warehouses.

 The company has received the Global Security Verification (GSV) certification which is the leading international business network for supporting the development and implementation of measures for enhancing global supply chain security. With this GSV certificate the company was determined by an independent 3rd party expert as having the appropriate security measures in place, as published by the U.S. Bureau of Customs and Border Protection. SAPL enjoys an esteemed clientele list including, among others, DAMCO, Kuehne+Nagel Ltd, APL Bangladesh Ltd, DSV Air & Sea Ltd, Maersk Bangladesh Ltd and several other prestigious Freight Forwarders and Mainline Operators.

International Waterways

As Bangladesh shares border mostly with India and it has good understanding with the govt of India, the two countries have common interests over waterways. In order to improve/increase the trade and tourism of both the countries, the govts have signed a Protocol on 6th June 2015 to facilitate the use of International waterways. The protocol initially outlined the following 8 Routes to be used by the operators of both the countries:

  • Kolkata- Haldia- Raimongal- -Chalna- Khulna- Mongla- KawkhaliBarisal- Hizla- Chandpur- Narayanganj- Aricha- Sirajganj- BahadurabadChilmari- Dhubri- Pandu- Shilghat.
  • Shilghat- Pandu- Dhubri- Chilmari- Bahadurabad- Sirajganj- ArichaNarayanganj- Chandpur- Hizla- Barisal- Kawkhali- Mongla- KhulnaChalna- Raimongal- Haldia- Kolkata.
  • Kolkata- Haldia- Raimongal- Mongla- Kawkhali- Barisal- HizlaChandpur- Narayanganj- Bhairab Bazar- Ashuganj- Ajmiriganj- MarkuliSherpur- Fenchuganj- Zakiganj- Karimganj.
  • Karimganj- Zakiganj- Fenchuganj- Sherpur- Markuli- AjmiriganjAshuganj- Bhairab Bazar- Narayanganj- Chandpur- Hizla- BansalKawkhali- Mongla- Raimongal- Haldia- Kolkata.
  • Rajshahi- Godagari- Dhulian.
  • Dhulian- Godagari- Rajshahi.
  • Karimganj- Zakiganj- Fenchuganj- Sherpur- Markuli- AjmiriganjAshuganj- Bhairab Bazar- Narayanganj- Chandpur- Aricha- SirajganjBahadurabad- Chilmari- Dhubri- Pandu- Shilghat.
  • Shilghat- Pandu- Dhubri- Chilmari- Bahadurabad- Sirajganj- ArichaChandpur- Narayanganj- Bhairab Bazar- Ashuganj- Ajmiriganj- MarkuliSherpur- Fenchuganj- Zakiganj- Karimganj

For now, cruise operators have shown interest to use Kolkata-Haldia-Raimongal-Chalna-Khulna-Mongla-Kawkhali-Barishal-Hizla-Chandpur-Narayanganj-Aricha-Sirajganj-Bahadurabad-Chilmari-Dhubri-Pandu-Shilghat (Assam) route, stretching 1,535km. In future such other routes will be declared by the Competent Authorities from time to time.

Water is essential to life and good Heath. It’s also vital to create jobs, propel economies forward, and boost social development. India and Bangladesh are reviving centuries-old inland waterways that once moved goods and people throughout both countries as well as into Bhutan and Nepal. The improvements will promote trade, attract investment, and stimulate development. More than 600 million people in Bangladesh and India live along the Ganges, Brahmaputra, and Meghna rivers. Millions more live near navigable tributaries. Moving goods via water is cheaper and more environmentally friendly than trucks on congested highways .

It may be mentioned here that for using waterways with other countries the waters of Bay of Bengal will be required to use.

General overview

Indian transit traffic and Indo-Bangladesh bilateral traffic regularly travel along two designated Inland Water Transport (IWT) Protocol routes across Bangladesh. These routes are highly underutilized, partly due to rapid siltation, lack of sufficient navigational aids, and partly due to Ltd number of ports of call (4 ports on either side). There are no inter-country passengers’ movements by IWT.

Initiative to move containers between Bangladesh and India, by IWT (inland water transport) is already underway, as it could also benefit Bangladesh considerably. An IWT container terminal is already in operation at Pangaon near Dhaka, with a design capacity of handling 116,000, 20 feet containers. This river port has encouraged containers movements between Kolkata-Dhaka, and Chattogram-Dhaka without difficulty.

Meanwhile Bangladesh ha s declared River port cum Container terminal at “Ashuganj” as the 5th port of call, while India agreed to designate “Shilghat” (near Guwahati and 100 km upstream of Pandu) as their 5th port of call for use by Bangladesh.


For additional details, please see the following document: 

Bangladesh Ferry Map

Bangladesh Waterways additional information

Note: The information provided in the attached documents, which has been taken from the old DLCA, does not match the structure of the new LCA and is therefore provided separately.

For contact information, please see the following link: 

4.4 Bangladesh Port and Waterways Company Contact List

2.6 Bangladesh Storage Assessment

Introduction and overview

Despite strong economic growth and a steady decline in poverty in Bangladesh over the past decade, natural disasters regularly cause serious damage to the country’s infrastructure and agricultural sectors, severely affecting food access and food availability for the poor and vulnerable. As 80 percent of Bangladesh’s population lives in rural areas and around 53 percent of the rural population is classified as poor, climate shocks and stresses have particularly negative implications for their food, livelihood security and welfare. In Bangladesh a total 36 million MT of rice and around 2.6 million MT of wheat are produced in a year. More over some times during crisis more food grains are also imported to meet emergency situations. For safely storing the food grains, proper food storage capacity needs to be increased, for which the govt is working. At present, the total storage capacity of government warehouses and silos is around 2.1 million MT and this capacity will be increased to 2.7 million MT by 2020 and around 3 million MT by 2025. Moreover there are some private warehouses for storage on rental basis.

 

Government institutions on food and storage

The public food operation of Bangladesh is based on a set of policies and an organizational structure designed to carry out these policies. The Director General of Food (DGF) under the ministry of food is the primary organization consists of a number of branches entrusted with the task of procurement, storage, movement and distribution of food.

As a price stabiliser Public Food Distribution System (PFDS) acts as a buffer stock agency, buying paddy, rice and wheat when prices are low and later supplying that food grain to the market when prices are high. The GoB uses their PFDS network to transport the grain from the Silo or central storage deports (CSDs)  to the local supply  deports (LSDs).  As per UNDAF, WFP also using these GoB’s PFDS system for managemet of their cereal food commodities. The lack of storage capacity in areas prone to natural disasters may result in delayed response to relief distribution.  Improved processing system can produce higher output and reduce the storage, transit and handling losses as well as reduce post-harvest losses.

Storage plays the key role in the entire process of procurement. Under given situations of price and supplies, the level of procurement is functionally related to that of the storage facilities. Disparities between capacity utilisation at CSD and LSDs stem from the high demand for local transport. Capacity utilization and stock turnover vary considerably from season to season as warehouses are more fully and often over utilized during the height of the domestic procurement drive but remain relatively underutilized the rest of the year, taking them available to relief agencies.

List of Officers at the office of DG Food who are responsible for Management and operation of country's overall food system, Implementation of national food policy strategies and Establishment of dependable national food security system in the country along with meeting the emergency food requirement.


Name

Designation

Contact No

Email

Mr. Sarwar Mahmud

Director General (Additional Secretary)

Phone: +88-02-9584834

Fax: +88-02-9556067

dg@dgfood.gov.bd

Mr. Md. Harun-Ar-Rashid

Personal Secretary to DG

Phone: +88-02-9556064


Mr. Md. Abdul Aziz Molla

Additional Director General

Phone: +88-02-9561871

Mobile: 01937-087098

 adg@dgfood.gov.bd

Mr. Parimal Chandra Sarker

Director (Admin)

Mobile: 01715-057088

dadm@dgfood.gov.bd

Mr. Mohammad Faruk Hossain

Additional Director

Phone: +88-02-9583899

Mobile: 01921177554

adl.adm@dgfood.gov.bd

Mr. Anisuzzzaman

Director (Procurement)

Phone: +88-02-9550261

Mobile: 01715122721

dproc@dgfood.gov.bd

Mr. Md. Abdus Salam

Addl. Director

(Procurement)

Phone: +88-02-9556302

Mobile: 01711-374674

adl.proc@dgfood.gov.bd

Mr. Saiful Kabir Khan

Deputy Director (EP)

Phone: +88-02-9558166

Mobile: 01914-218205

dd.ep@dgfood.gov.bd

Alamgir Kabir

Deputy Director (IP)

Procurement

Phone: +88-02-9556197

Mobile: 01712-110889

akbir.findu@gmail.com

Mr. Abdullah Al Mamun

Director (Mov, Storage and Silo Division)

Phone: +88-02-9550276

Mobile: 01713-202100

dmss@dgfood.gov.bd

Mr. Utpal Kumar Shaha


Addl. Director (Mov Storage & Silo)

Phone: +88-02-9550270

Mobile: 01711-483894

adl.move@dgfood.gov.bd

Mr. Md. Selimul Azam

Deputy Director (Mov, Storage and Silo Division)

Phone: +88-02-9550270

Mobile: 01711-191815


Mr. Md. Nazim Uddin

Deputy Director (Mov, Storage and Silo Division)

Phone: 88-02-47120082

Mobile: 01718-064266

dd.silo@dgfood.gov.bd

Mr. Amjad Hossain

Director, Supply Distribution and Marketing (SDM)

Phone: 88-02-9556075

Mobile: 01718957839

dsdm@dgfood.gov.bd

Mr. Harun Ur Rashid

Deputy Director, SDM

Phone: 88-02-9556075

Mobile: 01734718817

dd.supply@dgfood.gov.bd

 

Regional and district controller of food

Dhaka Region

Sl. No

Name & Designation

Office Phone

E-mail

 1.

Mr. Md. Jamal Hossain, RCF, Dhaka

02-7452983

rcf.dhk@dgfood.gov.bd

2.

Mr. Md. Main Uddin

DCF, Dhaka

02-7452914

dcf.dhk@dgfood.gov.bd

 3. 

Mr. Md. Sirajul Islam

DCF, Narayangonj

02-7634652

dcf.ngj@dgfood.gov.bd

4.

Mr. Md. Jahangir Alam (A.C.)

DCF, Narshindi

02-9462614

dcf.nsd@dgfood.gov.bd

5.

Mr. Md. Abu Bakar (In Charge)

DCF, Munshigonj

0691-7611130

dcf.mng@dgfood.gov.bd

 6. 

Mr. Md. Zahirul Islam Khan 

DCF, Gazipur

02-9262439

dcf.gzp@dgfood.gov.bd

 7. 

Mr. Md. Kamal Hossain

DCF, Manikgonj

0651-7710399

dcf.mnk@dgfood.gov.bd

8.

Mr. Md. Jahangir Alam

DCF, Mymensing

091-64359

dcf.myn@dgfood.gov.bd

9.

Mr. Ms. Suraya Khatun

DCF, Netrokona

0951-61470

dcf.nBDT@dgfood.gov.bd

10. 

Mr. Md. Mahabubur Rahman Khan

DCF, Jamalpur

0981-63124

dcf.jmp@dgfood.gov.bd 

11.

Mr. Md. Forhath Khandokar 

DCF, Sherpur

0931-61348

dcf.spr@dgfood.gov.bd 

 12.  

Mr. Md. Kamal Hossain

DCF, Tangail

0921-64018

dcf.tgl@dgfood.gov.bd 

13.

Mr. Mojibur Rahman

DCF, Rajbari

0641-65535

dcf.rjb@dgfood.gov.bd

14. 

Mr. Md. Tazul Islam (self-pay)

DCF, Faridpur

0631-63096

dcf.fdr@dgfood.gov.bd

15.

Mr. Saifur Rahman (A. C.)

DCF, Gopalgonj

0668-55370

dcf.gpl@dgfood.gov.bd 

16.

Mr. Saifur Rahman

DCF, Madaripur

0661-62317

dcf.mdr@dgfood.gov.bd 

17.

Mr.  Nur E Alam Siddiqiue

DCF, Shariatpur

0601-61636

dcf.srp@dgfood.gov.bd 

18. 

Mr. Mohammad Tanvir Hossain

DCF, Kishorgonj

0941-61788

dcf.ksj@dgfood.gov.bd

Barisal Region

1.

Mr. Reza Mohammad Mohsin

RCF, Barishal

0431-61012

0431-61013

rcf.bsl@dgfood.gov.bd

2.

Mr. Md. Moshiur Rahman

DCF, Barishal

0431-2175403

dcf.bsl@dgfood.gov.bd

3.

Mr. Md. Nazmul Hossain

DCF, Jhalakati

0498-63252

dcf.jkt@dgfood.gov.bd

 4.

Mr. Moklech AL Amin

DCF, Patuakhali

0441-62414

dcf.pBDT@dgfood.gov.bd

5.

Mr. Sonchit Chakma

DCF, Perojpur

0461-62519

dcf.prj@dgfood.gov.bd

 6.

Mr. Md. Shahidul Islam

DCF, Borguna

0448-62309

dcf.brg@dgfood.gov.bd

Chattogram Region

1. 

Mr. Md. Jamal Hossain, RCF, Chattogram

031-613112,

031-637053

rcf.ctg@dgfood.gov.bd

2.

Mr. Abu Nayeem Md. Shafiul Alam

DCF, Chattogram

031-637219

dcf.ctg@dgfood.gov.bd

3. 

Mr. S M Tahsinul Hoq (c.c)

DCF, Coxs bazaar

0341-63311

0341-64255

dcf.cxb@dgfood.gov.bd

4.

Mr. SUMAYIA NAJNIN (c.c.)

DCF, Rangamati

0351-62331

dcf.rgt@dgfood.gov.bd

5.

Mr. Md. Ashraful Alam

DCF, Khagrachari

0371-61860

dcf.kgr@dgfood.gov.bd

6.

Mr. Noyon Joti Chakma (A.C.) 

DCF, Bandarban

0361-62558

dcf.bbn@dgfood.gov.bd

7.

 DCF, Noakhali

0321-61057

dcf.nkl@dgfood.gov.bd

8.

Mr. Nayan Joti Chakma (Addl)

DCF, Laxmipur

0381-62566

dcf.lxm@dgfood.gov.bd

9.

Mr. S M Kaisar Ali (Addl)

DCF, Feni

0331-74025

dcf.fni@dgfood.gov.bd

10.

Mr. S. M Kaisar Ali

DCF, Cumilla

081-64655

dcf.cml@dgfood.gov.bd

11.

Mr. Subir Nath Chowdhury

DCF, Brahmonbaria

0851-58232

dcf.bbr@dgfood.gov.bd

12.

Mr. Subhash Chandra Nam (AC)

DCF, Chandpur

0841-63160

dcf.cdr@dgfood.gov.bd

Khulna Region

1.  

Mr. Md. Mahabubur Rahman

RCF, Khulna

041-762398

rcf.kln@dgfood.gov.bd 

2.

Mr. Muhammad Tanvir Rahman

DCF, Khulna

041-2830084

dcf.kln@dgfood.gov.bd

3.

Mr. A K M Shahidul Haque (Acting)

DCF, Bagerhat

0468-62257

dcf.bgt@dgfood.gov.bd 

4.

Mr. Md. Zakir Hossain

DCF, SaBDThira

0471-63219

dcf.sBDT@dgfood.gov.bd

5.

Mr. Manwar Hossain (In Charge)

DCF, Kushtia

071-61918

dcf.kst@dgfood.gov.bd

 6.

Mr. Md. Razaul Karim (In Charge)

DCF, Chuadanga

0761-63150

dcf.cdg@dgfood.gov.bd

7.

Mr. Md. Abdul Hamin Biswash

DCF, Meherpur

0791-62320

dcf.mpr@dgfood.gov.bd

8.

Mr. Md Liakot Hossain

DCF, Jashore

0421-65122

dcf.jsr@dgfood.gov.bd

9.

Mr. Nakib Sad Saiful Islam

DCF, Jhenaidah

0451-63209

dcf.jnd@dgfood.gov.bd

10.

Mr. Md. Main-Ul-Islam (Incharge)

DCF, Magura

0488-62411

dcf.mgr@dgfood.gov.bd


 11.

Mr. Monotosh Kunar Mojumdar (Acting)

DCF, Narail

0481-62316

dcf.nrl@dgfood.gov.bd

Rajshahi Region

1.

Mr. Md. Moniruzzaman

RCF, Rajshahi

0721-772656

0721-776340

rcf.rjs@dgfood.gov.bd 

2. 

Mr. Md Nazmul Haque Bhuiyan

DCF, Rajshahi

0721-774821

dcf.rjs@dgfood.gov.bd

3.

Mr. G. M. Faruk Hossain Patwary

DCF, Noagaon

0741-62485

dcf.ngn@dgfood.gov.bd

4. 

Mr. Md Shafiqul Islam 

DCF, Natore

0771-62608

dcf.ntr@dgfood.gov.bd

5.

Mr. Md. Reajur Rahman Raju 

DCF, Chapainawabganj

0781-52473

dcf.nbj@dgfood.gov.bd

6.

Mr. Iqbal Bahar Chowdhury

DCF, Pabna

0731-66135

dcf.pbn@dgfood.gov.bd

7.

Mr. Md. Mizanur Rahman

DCF, Sirajganj

0751-62178

dcf.srj@dgfood.gov.bd

8.

Mr. Md. Monirul Islam 

DCF, Joypurhat

0571-62367

dcf.jpt@dgfood.gov.bd

9. 

Mr. S M Saiful Islam

DCF, Bogura

051-66015

dcf.bgr@dgfood.gov.bd

Rangpur Region

1.

Mr. Md. Raihanul Kabir

RCF, Rangpur

0521-52140

rcf.rng@dgfood.gov.bd

2.

Mr. Md. Abdul Kader

DCF, Rangpur

0521-62282

dcf.rng@dgfood.gov.bd

Web: http://food.rangpur.gov.bd/

3. 

Mr. Md. Zahirul Islam

DCF, Gaibanda

0541-61593

dcf.gbn@dgfood.gov.bd

Website: http://food.gaibandha.gov.bd/

4.

Mr. Kazi Saifuddin (A.R)

DCF, Lalmonirhat

0591-61406

dcf.lmt@dgfood.gov.bd

Website: http://food.lalmonirhat.gov.bd/

5.

Mr. Md. Mohibul Hoq

DCF, Kurigram

0581-61453

dcf.krm@dgfood.gov.bd

Website: http://food.kurigram.gov.bd/

6. 

Mr. Kazi Saifuddin 

DCF, Nilphamari

0551-61448

dcf.nlf@dgfood.gov.bd

Website: http://food.nilphamari.gov.bd/

7.

Mr. Md. Ashrafuzzaman

DCF, Dinajpur

0531-65066

dcf.dnj@dgfood.gov.bd

Website: http://food.dinajpur.gov.bd/

8.

Mr. Mohammad. Babul Hossain 

DCF, Thakurgaon

0561-52030

dcf.BDTg@dgfood.gov.bd

Website: http://food.thakurgaon.gov.bd/

9.

Mr. Mohammad Babul Hossain (Addl)

DCF, Panchgor

0568-61311

dcf.png@dgfood.gov.bd

Website: http://food.panchagarh.gov.bd/

Sylhet Region

1.

Mr. Mohammad Mamunur Rashid 

RCF, Sylhet

0821-840836

rcf.slt@dgfood.gov.bd

 2.

Mr. Md Mizanur Rahman

DCF, Sylhet

0821-717143

dcf.slt@dgfood.gov.bd


3.

Mr. Manoj Kanti Das Chowdhury

DCF, Moulvibazar

0861-52210

dcf.mlb@dgfood.gov.bd

4.

Mr.  Md. Abdus Salam (CC)

DCF, Hobigonj

0831-62322

dcf.hbj@dgfood.gov.bd

5.

Mr. Md. Zakaria Mostafa (CC)

DCF, Sunamgonj

0871-61590

dcf.snj@dgfood.gov.bd


Officers' information (Silos)

Ashugonj

Sl. No

Name & Designation

Office Phone

E-mail

 1.

Mr. Mohammad Anwar Hossain

Silo Superintendent, Ashugonj

08528-74202, 

Fax: 08528-74499

silo.asn@dgfood.gov.bd 

2.

Mr. Khondakar Serajus Saleqin

Maintenance Engineer

08528-74203,

Fax: 08528-74499

saleqin.cuetme03@gmail.com

Chattogram

1.

Mr. Mohammad Asaduzzaman

Silo Superintendent, Chattogram

031-2501252 Fax: 031-2501255

silo.ctg@dgfood.gov.bd

2.

Mohammad Ashfaqur Rahman

Assistant Maintenance Engineer

 031-2501253

silo.ctg@dgfood.gov.bd

Narayangonj

1.

Mr. Md. Tajol Islam 

Silo Superintendent, Narayangonj

02-7693140

 Fax: 02-7694175 

silo.ngj@dgfood.gov.bd


2.

Rakibul Hasan

Maintenance Engineer

02-7693012


silo.ngj@dgfood.gov.bd

Shantahar, Bogura

1.

Mr. Mohammad Faizullah Khan Shiblee

Silo Superintendent, Santahar

0741-69483

silo.stu@dgfood.gov.bd

Khulna and Mongla

1.

Mr. Arup Kumar Mishra

Silo Superintendent (Khulna)

(Addl Charge-Mongla)

041-774528

silo.kln@dgfood.gov. (Khulna)

silo.mongla@dgfood.gov.bd (Mongla)

 

Various storage types

Following types of storage system are now prevailing in the country:

  1. Homestead storage.
  2. Trade level storage.
  3. Mill cum trade level storage.
  4. Automatic milling storage.
  5. Government storage for buffer stock.
  6. Modern storage system.

While storage facilities and functions assume great importance, particularly in the case of subsistence crop, little is known about the various aspects of the initial storage of rice and paddy. The big rice-millers have large storage godowns in their compounds. They perform a considerable part of this function in the area they are located. The traders at the primary market do not have any storage facilities.


BADC warehouse and cold storage with capacity           

</

Sl

District /Place

Storage area (sq ft)

Capacity (MT)

Remarks

Cold Storage for Fish, Fruit and Vegetables

1.

Dhaka Airport

-

120


2.

Jhumjhumpur, Jashore

-

50


3. 

Sholoshohor, Chattogram

-

50


4.

Sayedpur, Cumilla

-

50


5.

Chitla, Meherpur

3500

50

Dehumidified

6.

Monirampur, Jashore

3500

70

Dehumidified

7. 

Nashipur, Dinajpur

2500

100

Dehumidified

8.

Kashimpur, Gajipur

13520

1000


9.

Sherpur

11224

1000


10.

Kishorganj

11520

1000


11.

Shrimongol, Moulovi Bazar

8405

1000


12.

Bogura

6400

1000


13.

Faridpur

9600

1000


14.

Jashore

9600

1000


15.

Rangpur

12800

1000


16.

Rajshahi

10310

1000


17.

Thakurgaon

10800

1000


18.

Baradi, Meherpur

9600

1000


19.

Noshipur, Dinajpur

9600

1000


20.

Chandpur

8595

1000


21.

Kushtia

12000

1200


22.

Dhonbari, Tangail

20000

6000


23.

Domar, Nilfamari

9400

1500


24.

Homna, Cumilla

9600

1000


25.

Gopalgonj

580

50

Dehumidified

26.

Naogaon

775

40

Dehumidified

General Storage/Warehouse

27.

Citla,Meherpur

8600

340


28.

Nashipur, Dinajpur

8250

300


29.

Bogura, Rajshahi

6950

400


30.

Chuadanga

58400

7300


31.

Tangail

66,487.5

7,950


32.

Rangpur

40,000

5000


33.

Dinajpur

38400

4800


34.

Faridpur

39200

4900


35.

Chattogram

18,779

2350


36.

Cumilla

36,900

4,200


37.

Pabna

36,000

4,500


38.

Thakurgaon

38,400

4,800


39.

Jashore

30,400

3,800


40.

Bogura

30,400

3800


41.

Meherpur

14,800

1,850


42.

Rajshahi

29,600

3,700


43.

Dhaka

43,131

4,880


44.

Hobiganj

14,400

1,800


45.

Barisal

6,400

800


46.

Narayanganj

268.75

25


47.

Norsingdi

537.5

50


48.

Shripur

537.5

50


49.

Kaliganj

215

20


50.

Gajipur

537.5

50


51.

Manikganj

1612.5

150


52.

Munsiganj

3225

300


53.

Mymensingh 

11,825

1,100


54.

Muktagacha

2,150

200


55.

Goforgaon

537.5

50


56.

Isshorganj

537.5

50


57.

Nandail

4300

400


58.

Fulpur

4300

400


59.

Jamalpur

5375

500


60.

Melandoho

537.5

50


61.

Sherpur

2,150

200


62.

Kishorganj

5,590

520


63.

Pakundia

1,075

100


64.

Netrokona

1,612.5

150


65.

Faridpur

13,625

1,250


66.

Madaripur

1,612.5

150


67.

Shoriyatpur

1,612.5

150


68.

Rajbari

537.5

50


69.

Gopalganj

537.5

50


70.

Cox’s Bazar

4,300

400


71.

Rangamati

1,075

100


72.

Bandorban

1,075

100


73.

Thanchi

215

20


74.

Lama

215

20


75.

Khagrachori

2,150

200


76.

Noakhali

12,900

1,200


77.

Lakshmipur

537.5

50


78.

Feni

2,150

200


79.

Debidwar

2,150

200


80.

Borura

2,150

200


81.

Daudkandi

4,300

400


82.

Burichong

215

20


83.

Laksam

4,300

400


84.

Chouddogram

4,300

400


85.

B. Baria

5,750

530


86.

Hajiganj

430

40


87.

Chandpur

5,375

500


88.

Sylhet

11,825

1,400


89.

Moulovibazar

2,150

200


90.

Hobiganj

537.5

50


91.

Sunamganj

537.5

50


92.

Rajshahi

10,750

1,000


93.

Boraigram

2,150

200


94.

Chapai Nobabganj

537.5

50


95.

Nowga

4,300

400


96.

Natore

2,150

200


97.

Pabna

7,525

700


98.

Sirajganj

5,375

500


99.

Bogura

7,632.4

710


100.

Joypurhat

2,150

200


101.

Rangpur

15,050

1,400


102.

Pirganj

1,075

100


103.

Polashbari

3,225

300


104.

Gobindoganj

3,225

300


105.

Pirgacha

2,150

200


106.

Sayedpur

215

20


107.

Nilfamari

1,075

100


108.

Gaibandha

1,075

100


109.

Ulipur

2,150

200


110.

Nageshwari

752.5

70


111.

Kurigram

2,150

200


112.

Lalmonirhat

1,290

120


113.

Dinajpur

1,075

100


114.

Parbotipur

1,075

100


115.

Birganj

2,150

200


116.

Thakurgaon

3,225

300


117.

Ponchogar

2,150

200


118.

Khulna

9,137.5

850


119.

Bagerhat

537.5

50


120.

Kaliganj

2,150

200


121.

SaBDThira

537.5

50


122.

Jashore

19,550

2000


123.

Keshabpur

2,150

200


124.

Moheshpur

537.5

50


125.

Jhinaidah

1,290

120