Solomon Islands Humanitarian Background

Disasters, Conflicts and Migration

Natural Disasters

Yes / No

Comments / Details

Drought

No-

Earthquakes

YesMay 2007, magnitude 8.1 - 345km northwest of the Solomon Islands'

Epidemics

No-

Extreme Temperatures

No-

Flooding

YesFlooding in February of 2009 and 2010 affected approximately 60,000 people each time.

Insect Infestation

No-

Mudslides

YesAssociated with earthquakes – 2007 event

Volcanic Eruptions

YesIn 1971 a volcano erupted on Savo island, affecting 6000 people

High Waves / Surges

YesMay 2007, magnitude 8.1 - 345km northwest of the Solomon Islands resulting in a tsunami affecting approximately 36,588 people. Jan 2010, series of earthquakes measuring up to 7.2, which generated a tsunami that affected Rendova and Tetepare Islands.

Wildfires

No-

High Winds

No-

Other Comments

Climate change is projected to impact heavily on agriculture, forestry and fisheries in the Pacific islands, leading to increased food insecurity and malnutrition (FAO)
http://reliefweb.int/node/334950

Man-Made Issues

Civil Strife

No-

International Conflict

No-

Internally Displaced Persons

No-

Refugees Present

No-

Landmines / UXO Present

No-

Other Comments

n/a

For more detailed database on disasters by country, please see the Centre for Research on Epidemiology of Disasters:

Website of Emdat - Disaster Database

Calamities and Seasonal Affects

Seasonal Affects on Transport

There are few seasonal affects on transport in the Solomon Islands. Heavy rains during the cyclone season can cause issues with infrastructure such as bridges and roads.. Most goods are transported by boat so weather can effect the use of boats but this is possible all year round.

Seasonal Affects on Storage and Handling (economic, social, climate…)

There are few seasonal affects on handling and storage in the Solomon Islands. The high temperatures and humidity mean that perisable goods have a short shelf life, so contingencies of food stuffs like rice and flour are not stored for long periods of time by store owners or humanitarian agencies.

Capacity and Contacts for In-Country Emergency Response

Government

The National Disaster Council has the primary responsibility for disaster risk management in the Solomon Islands. Established by the National Disaster Council Act (1989) and National Disaster Risk Management Plan (2010), it is supported by the National Disaster Management Office (NDMO) under the Ministry of Environment, Climate Change, Disaster Management and Meteorology.
The National Disaster Council (NDC) is responsible for the overview of disaster events. The Council has responsibility for oversight for arrangements for all hazards through four lead agencies:

During a disaster event the National Disaster Operations Committee (N-Doc) is activated for the operational management of the disaster. The disaster coordinator is the head of the NDMO (Disaster Coordinator) and is responsible for the coordination of the overall operational response to a disaster.

The National Emergency Operations Centre (NEOC) is based at the NDMO office in a state of readiness for disaster response. It is responsible for information management, media management and cluster coordination.

In emergencies the Government will often set up a central fund with contributions gathered from various donors. This is then administered by the government. Various donors also have agreements with NGO’s to provide either direct funding or relief supplies in emergencies

Further information on the governtments capacities to respond to emergencies can be found in the following document:

Solomon Islands Humanitarian Background Additional Information

Note: The information provided in the attached documents, which has been taken from the old DLCA, does not match the structure of the new LCA and is therefore provided separately.

4.1 Solomon Islands Government Contact List

Humanitarian Community

4.2 Solomon Islands Humanitarian Agency Contact List