Disasters, Conflicts and Migration

Natural Disasters

Type

Occurs

Comments / Details

Drought

Yes

Rarotonga relies on rainwater for its source of drinking water so is subject to shortages during prolonged dry periods, however this has never resulted in an emergency situation. The Outer Islands are not affected in this way as they use bores for sourcing water.

Earthquakes

No

According to the earthquake hazard predictions, Cook Islands are situated in a relatively quiet seismic area and have low chance of experiencing a strong earthquake in the next 50 years. Nonetheless, the larger tectonic area of Pacific “Ring of Fire” can in the future generate tsunamis that may affect Cook Islands' shores (PCRAFI, 2011).

Epidemics

Yes

Outbreaks of Dengue fever occur from time to time but are quickly contained and there have been no deaths recorded from it in the past 10 years

Extreme Temperatures

No

 

Flooding

Yes

Flooding can occur to low-lying areas as a result of king tides and wave surges. This is generally not life-threatening.

Insect Infestation

No

 

Mudslides

No

 

Volcanic Eruptions

No

 

High Waves / Surges

Yes

Disasters like tsunamis may pose threats to human lives and the infrastructure of the Cook Islands in the future. In 1909, a tsunami with waves of up to three metres high caused damage to roads, bridges and crops in Rarotonga.

Wildfires

No

 

High Winds

Yes

Tropical cyclones are the single most likely natural hazard to affect the Cook Islands, with cyclone season falling between November and April. In the 41-year period between 1969 and 2010, a total of 47 tropical cyclones passed within 400 km of Rarotonga, an average of just over one cyclone per season. The number of cyclones varies widely from year to year, with none in some seasons, but up to six in others. Over the period 1969 to 2010, cyclones occurred more frequent in El Niño years.

Other Comments

 

Man-Made Issues

Civil Strife

No

 

International Conflict

No

 

Internally Displaced Persons

No

 

Refugees Present

No

 

Landmines / UXO Present

No

 

Other Comments

 

 

For a more detailed database on disasters by country, please see the Centre for Research on Epidemiology of Disasters Country Profile.

 

Seasonal Effects on Logistics Capacities

Seasonal Effects on Transport

Transport Type

Time Frame

Comments / Details

Primary Road Transport

From July - Sept

Some flooding may occur to low lying areas. Effects are short term (3-4 days)

Secondary Road Transport

From July - Sept

Some flooding may occur to low lying areas. Effects are short term (3-4 days)

Rail Transport

No

 

Air Transport

No

 

Waterway Transport

Oct- April

Cyclones may occur at this time of year causing rough seas and disruption to interisland shipping

 

There are no seasonal periods that cause disruption to transport or storage other than those occasional and relatively rare weather events mentioned in the tables above. 

 

Seasonal Effects on Transport

Transport Type

Time Frame

Comments / Details

Primary Road Transport

From (month) to (month)

REPLACE THIS TEXT with brief comments that specify the: type of economic, social, or climate related seasonal impact; area or region of the country impacted; and other relevant facts.

Secondary Road Transport

  

Rail Transport

  

Air Transport

  

Waterway Transport

  


REPLACE THIS TEXT with a brief 1 -3 paragraph narrative on seasons of the year, indicating the period and any effects on transport. A seasonal economic or social activity can have a big impact on transport (i.e. truck availability during harvest time, port and airports congestion during Hadj period in Muslim countries, etc.).

 

Seasonal Effects on Storage and Handling

Activity Type

Time Frame

Comments / Details

Storage

From (month) to (month)

REPLACE THIS TEXT with brief comments that specify the: type of economic, social, or climate related seasonal impact; area or region of the country impacted; and other relevant facts.

Handling

  

Other

  

REPLACE THIS TEXT with a 1 -3 paragraph narrative outlining potential seasonal effects on miscellaneous commodity handling and storage activities, such as repackaging parcel production. Specify if there is a potential need to pre-stock before seasonal bottlenecks arise.

Capacity and Contacts for In-Country Emergency Response

Government

REPLACE THIS TEXT with a 2 - 4 paragraph summary of the Government’s capacity to respond to emergencies, including the agencies and ministries involved, their degree of involvement and cooperation with the humanitarian community.  Specify whether military and/or civil defence assets are currently used in relief operations: if regularly used, how; if not, why not; if the use of military and/or civil defence assets could be used in a potential emergency situation; if yes, how, and if not, describe the limitations (legal or other) preventing their use. ENSURE GOVERNMENT AGENCIES IDENTIFIED IN THESE PARAGRAPHS HAVE THEIR CONTACT DETAILS IN SECTION 4.1: Government Contact List. Create the list by completing the 4.1 template. 

For more information on government contact details, please see the following link: HQ staff will input a link to section 4.1 Government Contact List here.

Humanitarian Community

REPLACE THIS TEXT with a 3 - 5 paragraph narrative on the current humanitarian structure. Identify key agencies and describe on-going programmes. ENSURE HUMANITARIAN AGENCIES IDENTIFIED IN THESE PARAGRAPHS HAVE THEIR CONTACT DETAILS IN SECTION 4.2: Humanitarian Agency Contact List. Create the contact list by completing 4.2 template.

For more information on humanitarian agency contact details, please see the following link: HQ staff will input a link to section 4.2 Humanitarian Agency Contact List here.