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South Sudan Additional Service Providers: Vehicle Rental, Taxi Companies, Freight Forwarding Agents, Handling Equipment, Power Generation and ISPs

Since independence the market of service providers have expanded exponentially with both national and international companies providing a host of support services. As in other business sectors, domestic operators and service providers have also seen significant growth and the government is actively encouraging the development of local ownership. However the growth in this sector and the quality of the services provided is constrained by a shortage of specialised skills in the local labour market and the perceived difficulty of doing business in South Sudan.  

Vehicle Rental

Various vehicle rental companies are present in South Sudan with a wide selection of vehicles available for hire. The vast majority of such companies however have small vehicle fleets with varying capacities and vehicles maintained to questionable standards. No large international vehicle rental companies are present in South Sudan and organisations looking to augment their vehicle fleet will need to negotiate directly with vehicle owners.

Taxi Companies

The taxi industry is unregulated and characterised by privately owner-operated vehicles and motorbikes. There are a number of larger locally owned taxi operators however travel rates vary and needs to be negotiated for. Travel by motorbike or ‘boda-boda’ is readily available and at a relatively low cost, however at significant risk due to prevailing road conditions. In general the use of locally available taxi’s and motorbikes is reliable; however it does pose some personal security risk to travellers. As no taxi operators have ‘passenger liability’ insurance. Hence, it is advisable that international travellers include this in any travel insurance. 

Freight Forwarding Agents

A number of freight forwarding companies and brokers with varying capacities are operational in South Sudan. The larger operators have good contacts within relevant government departments and access to a variety of logistical services including air, water and land transport providers making their services relatively reliable. The majority of freight forwarding agents are situated in Juba with a smaller number located in other major towns. 

Handling Equipment 

Handling equipment can be rented from local commercial companies or acquired in the market. Most specialised equipment need to be imported from neighbouring countries however.
Non-standardised pallets can be manufactured in the local market, in general however all wooden and plastic pallets are imported.

Electricity and Power 

The Ministry of Energy and Dams is responsible for the development of the country’s electricity infrastructure. In 2012, the ministry established the South Sudan Electricity Corporation (SSEC), which oversees the generation, transmission, distribution and sale of electricity within the country, and most of the state capitals now have some electrical power, commonly referred to as ‘City power’. The in-country power-generating infrastructure consists of large diesel operated power plants and distribution systems. However, the electrical power coverage is limited to these urban areas and prioritized for local administration/government and local hospitals, as the power grid is severely limited. The electricity supply in South Sudan is only partially accessible in certain areas and in these areas the supply is often erratic, and characterised by frequent power outages due to broken power units, or more commonly, a lack of fuel.
The most recently commissioned power plants and electrical distribution systems are situated in Juba, Malakal, Wau, Bor, Yambio, Rumbek and Renk. The power production plant for Juba has been greatly improved in terms of efficiency but still coverage of the town is limited. Malakal has good coverage through large functioning diesel generators. Considering that power generation is largely unreliable and inconsistent it is essential that major organizations have their own power generating capacity and back-up units. Small to large portable generators are readily available in local markets. In 2012, the country had approximately 33MW of installed generating capacity with partial access mainly to the towns Juba, Malakal and Wau.
In 2012, the Government entered into an agreement with the government of Ethiopia to import electricity into the country. The agreement called for the installation of a 230 KV transmission line from Gambela and a 500 KV transmission line from the Grand Renaissance Dam in Ethiopia to South Sudan. The agreement is to come into affect upon the completion of the dam.

Production Unit

Type [1]

Installed Capacity (MW)

Current Production (MW)

Juba (Wartsila)

Diesel

12 MW

Operational

Juba (Cummins)

Diesel

8 MW

Non-Operational

Malakal

Diesel

4.8 MW

Operational

Wau

Diesel

2 MW

Operational

Bor

Diesel

2 MW

Non Operational due to severe fuel shortages

Yambio

Diesel

2 MW

Non Operational due to severe fuel shortages

Rumbek

Diesel

2 MW

Non Operational due to severe fuel shortages

Renk (S/Station)

Diesel

40 Mva

Operational


[1] E.g. Hydroelectric power, Thermal power...

Internet Service Providers (ISPs)

South Sudan is one of the most expensive countries in Africa in terms of Internet usage, with an average retail cost of USD$ 4,000 per megabit via satellite. All licenced service providers use satellite-based V-Sat and WiMax technology as the country has no established fibre optics network, nor is it directly connected to East Africa’s internet fibre-optic networks serviced by The East African Marine Systems (TEAMS), Eastern Africa Submarine Cable System (EASSy) and SEACOM providers.
The Ministry of Telecommunication and Postal Services (MOTPS) plays an oversight function and is in charge of regulating and licencing of local telecommunications companies. Currently telecommunications regulations are set to change with the adoption of new regulations in late 2013.Currently there are no national carrier in South Sudan, however the Council of Ministers approved the establishment of a national telecommunications operator in May 2013. In late 2012, the country had five licensed Internet Service Providers and this number continues to grow with an estimated 15 ISPs currently in various stages of operation.

Internet Service Providers

Are there ISPs available?

(Yes / No)

Yes

Private or Government

Private

Dial-up only (Yes / No)

No

Approximate Rates

Dial-up:

n/a

Broadband:

n/a

Max leasable 'dedicated' bandwidth

n/a