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Nicaragua Additional Service Providers: Vehicle Rental, Taxi Companies, Freight Forwarding Agents, Handling Equipment, Power Generation and ISPs

For information on Nicaragua additional service provider contact details, please see the following link:

4.9 Nicaragua Additional Service Provision Contact List

Vehicle Rental

In Nicaragua there is availability, and transportation providers for humanitarian actions required by WFP.

Supplier list in Vehicle Rental Ver. Availability of suppliers to provide this service even in humanitarian situations.

Taxi Companies

There service availability even in humanitarian conditions. Small vehicles are properly identified four persons and legal documentation.

Freight Forwarding Agents

There service availability and businesses have adequate vehicular fleet as the applicant's claim.

Electricity and Power 

The energy generation in the country recorded a cumulative growth of 5.7 percent in June 2014 (5.7% in the same period of 2013), the renewable component the main source of generation (53.0%) in the semester. In the second quarter, the generation grew 5.4 percent year on year (6.0% in the first quarter of 2014), quarter was influenced by the seismic events of April and maintenance of Carlos Fonseca plant. Moreover, the
domestic fuel prices reflected monthly variation of 2.2, 0.8 and -0.1 percent for regular gasoline, super and diesel, respectively. This behavior was in line with the monthly increase of 3.3 percent in the price of foreign gasoline. Finally, the average spot price of WTI June was $ 105.1 per barrel (10.3% year on year) .The energy sector in Nicaragua has been evolving and developing with great
dynamism in the last five years with major public and private investments nationwide.

There is evidence in the improvement in the coverage of electrical services, from 63 percent in 2008 to 76 percent in 2012. The installed capacity of 2012 saw an increase of 68 percent compared to 2006; further that there has been a diversification generation methods. This has enabled supply the demand of the domestic market and target energy exports in the future via the Electrical Interconnection System for Central America (SIEPAC) project.
Nicaragua is the Central American country with the lowest electricity generation and the lowest percentage of population with access to electricity.

The Management of Isolated Systems Operation (DOSA), is the area of the Nicaraguan Electricity Company (ENEL) for supplying electricity services in the regions of the North Atlantic, Central and Southern Spain (23 sites), which benefiting more than 22,000 customers, including government entities, resorts, schools are. The electrical service has grown in the area of the Caribbean Coast of Nicaragua by more than 100 percent as of 26 thousand beneficiaries in 2007 users, happened to 62 000 people from 42 communities in the northern Caribbean, exactly the municipalities of Bonanza Rosita, Siuna, Puerto Cabezas and Waspam Prinzapolka first have access to electricity.

In Nicaragua, the company Dissur-Disnorte, owned by the Spanish Union Fenosa, controls 95% of the distribution.

ENTRESA (National Electricity Transmission Company SA de Nicaragua) is responsible for the operation, management and maintenance of high voltage network in Nicaragua. In Nicaragua, 100% transmission is controlled by ENATREL, which is also in charge of the expedition system.
The electrical system in Nicaragua has the National Interconnected System (SIN), covering more than 90% of the Pacific, Central and North of the country. The remaining regions are covered by small isolated systems experience frequent blackouts generation (RAAN, RAAS).
The SIEPAC the country's electricity grid will integrate with the rest of the Central American countries, which is expected to improve the reliability of supply and reduce costs.
The length of the transmission network is 1,923 kilometers, made of 335 miles of 230 kV, 138kV and 922 kms 666kms of 69 kV. The distribution network consists of 71 sub-stations.

  • Residential: 0,137 US $ per kWh
  • Commercial: US $ 0.187 per kWh
  • Industrial: 0,101 US $ per kWh

Nicaragua's electricity production in 2013 came in 58% of renewable sources (hydro, geothermal, biomass and wind) which is a record for the country. It is expected that by 2017 the installed capacity is of 94% renewable energy, and 6% of thermal energy. The installed capacity by 2013 is 1,300.00 megawatts (MW), 48.88% more generation capacity installed in 2008 which was 740.29 MWs

Production unit

Type[1]

 

Installed Capacity (MW)

Current Production (MW)

Hidrogesa

hydraulics

2

104.400

GECSA

Thermal

2

122 400

Gesarsa

Thermal

1

   6,400

ATDER-BL

Hydraulics (Private)

1

     900

Gemosa

Geothermal

1

 77.500

PENSA

Geothermal

1

 10 000

E. Amayo

Wind

1

 63 000

Albanisa

Thermal

10

291 200

CENSA

Thermal

1

  63 900

EEC

Thermal

1

  74 000

GEOSA

Thermal

1

 106 000

Monte Rosa

Thermal

1

   62 500

NSEL

Thermal

1

   59 000

Tipitapa

Thermal

1

   52 200


[1] E.g. Hydroelectric power, Thermal power...