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Azerbaijan Additional Service Providers: Vehicle Rental, Taxi Companies, Freight Forwarding Agents, Handling Equipment, Power Generation and ISPs

For information on Azerbaijan Additional Service Provider Contact details, please see the following link: 

4.8 Azerbaijan Additional Service Provision Contact List

 

Vehicle Rental

Most Azeri roads and streets are in such a state that it is practically impossible to break the speed limits, exception made for some avenues and streets in Baku which are kept in tip top shape (see map for main roads). Side streets and minor roads have all kinds of debris, open manholes, and are pot-holed, unmarked and unlit. Even in some areas in the center of the capital, streetlights are barely noticeable. Villages and rural areas are woefully under equipped with earth roads and puddles like great lakes.
Drivers pay little heed to traffic regulations, so expect a certain degree of artistic liberty when driving. Azeri driving behaviour is not incredibly dangerous nor aggressive, but don't depend on drivers to stay in their own lanes. Nor will they always pay attention to traffic signals or other drivers.
Note that "left-hand" turns across traffic are absolutely forbidden. You have to find a way to get to the other side of the street and then make a "right-hand" turn. Sometimes this means driving a kilometre or so out of your way and reversing direction. Sometimes, you'll find cars backing up a one-way street just so they can "legally" head in the direction they want to go. Drive defensively at all times.
Always carry your vehicle registration papers, passport and driver's licence. Also, make sure that your car's paperwork gives you authorization to drive it. An international driver's license is valid in Azerbaijan if you stay in the country for less than 4 months. After that, you'll need to get a stamp from the traffic police (79 S. Vurgun, tel. 984 002).
If a policeman signals you to pull over, he'll use a siren or point with a baton. Above all, stay calm and don't get out of the car. The officer will shake hands with you first, introduce himself, then ask for your license and car's documentation. Answer his questions, but don't volunteer information. Be ready to apologize. The officer may be looking for a bribe, but will eventually let you go without one. The police's obscure fines are more often than not, not for the local road fund, most are open to bribery to counteract their miserable wages.
Driving under the influence of alcohol is a very serious offence in Azerbaijan, so make sure that you have a replacement driver even if you plan to drink only a small amount of alcohol.

For information on Azerbaijan Rental Car Costs, please see the following document:

Rental Car Costs

Taxi Companies

Most taxis are unmetered. A journey anywhere within the city centre will cost 15,000 manats, though it is possible to negotiate much lower fares if you have the patience. Expect to be asked more if you dont't speak Azeri or Russian. Driving may be a little adventurous and rear seat belts do not abound.
Taxis do not generally accept foreign currencies. Make sure you have change before travelling as some drivers may not.
There are only two official taxi companies in Baku, use either the yellow Star cabs, or the white taxis with blue sign from Azerq Taxis. Those with blue license plates are officially licensed and are considered to be safer. You can book taxis by calling 62-15-15 or 62-12-44/7.

For information on Azerbaijan Additional Service Provider Contact details, please see the following link: 

4.8 Azerbaijan Additional Service Provision Contact List

 

Electricity and Power 

system: 220 V, 50 Hz, double pins, european plug (non-continentals should bring adapters)
production: 23,80 billion kWh (2007)
consumption: 27,50 billion kWh (2007)
Power cuts are frequent, even in Baku, where people usually stock a few candles at home. The production facilities consist of eight thermal plants supplying 85% of generating capacity, and 6 hydroelectric plants. Two-thirds of the country's thermal capacity is powered by Mazut (residual fuel oil), with natural gas as the secondary fuel (2400MWt). The second largest thermal plant is in Ali Bayramly (1050MWt).
Azerbaijan's power infrastructure, built in the Soviet Period, is generally in poor condition. Since independence there has been scarce public investment or maintenance of public infrastructure. Difficult economic conditions, high taxes and non-payment by customers left the power sector without sufficient working capital and investment funds. Over half the country's turbo-generators and boilers and large sections of the distribution network have been in use for more than 40 years. Most energy generating and distribution equipment and parts are imported from Russia and the Ukraine, since they were originally part of the same system the parts are compatible and very price-competitive.
Although domestic production surpasses consuption, because of the country's inefficient distribution network, energy losses amounted to around 20% of the electricity that was generated. In order to supply electricity to all parts of the country, Azerbaijan imports power from Russia, Turkey, Iran, and Georgia, and the country participates in energy exchanges as well. Apart from hydroelectric power, renewable energies have no tradition in Azerbaijan but recently and agreement between Azerenerji and Sumitomo has been signed for a project for wind energy.

Production Unit

Type [1]

Installed Capacity (MW)

Current Production (MW)

220 V, 50 Hz

n/a

 27,50 billion kWh (2007)23,80 billion kWh (2007)

[1] E.g. Hydroelectric power, Thermal power...

Electricity is supplied at 220V 50Hz with sockets the European standard CEE-7/7 "Schukostecker" or "Schuko" or the compatible, but non-grounded, CEE-7/16 "Europlug" types. Generally speaking, US and Canadian travellers should pack an adapter and tranformer for these outlets if they plan to use North American electrical equipment in Azerbaijan.
Additionally, some older buildings may be still equipped with Soviet-era outlets. The Soviet GOST-7396 standard was very similar to the current European CEE-7/7 "Schuko plug", but the pins were of a 4.0 mm diameter, while the Schuko features 4.8 mm pins. As such, the pins of a Schuko may be too large to fit into a Soviet-era outlet, although the smaller Europlug will still fit. Although the Soviet-era outlets have largely been phased out, travellers who are particularly concerned with having the ability to plug in at all times may consider packing an adapter for the Soviet-era outlets too, just in case.
Also, make sure to bring your own automated voltage transformer because the electricity in Azerbaijan short circuits and "jumps" a lot and many items may get shocked if you don't bring the adapter.
Involvement of new private generating enterprises (mini-power plants) in the electricity sector is minor thus far though additional investment in new generating capacities and transmission/distribution operations is a medium term policy objective.

Although domestic production surpasses consumption, because of the country's inefficient distribution network, energy losses amounted to around 20% of the electricity that was generated. In order to supply electricity to all parts of the country, Azerbaijan imports power from Russia, Turkey, Iran, and Georgia, and the country participates in energy exchanges as well.

Power grid / network coverage
80 %
Is supply regular and constant throughout the country?
no, Power cuts are frequent, even in Baku
On average, how often does power supply go out?
frequently
On average, how long does the outage last?
about 1 hour per day

For information on Azerbaijan Additional Service Provider Contact details, please see the following link: 

4.8 Azerbaijan Additional Service Provision Contact List

Internet Service Providers (ISPs)

High speed internet and IPTV services are provided to subscribers through BTCPA network. At present, 173,169 subscribers connected to the network, use the services of high speed internet through broadband connections (including 88 764 of them use Internet services from BTCPA, 84 405 - other ISPs). Taking into account the increasing demand for online services, the number of ADSL ports in BTCPA network increased to 232,246 units. Of these, 127,568 units (54.9%) are installed by BTCPA, 104 678 units (45.1%) - by other ISPs.Currently, 27.8% of BTCPA subscribers have access to high speed internet through a broadband connection.

The Internet started to develop in Azerbaijan in 1993. The first Azerbaijani website was created in 1994 by the National Academy of Sciences of Azerbaijan, and the website of the President of Azerbaijan Republic, which was founded in 1997, became the first public Internet resource.
Administration of the national top-level domain AZ has been carried out since 1993.
From the first days the Internet developed by mainly private sector. Until 2000, the activities of Internet service providers (ISP) were conducted under a special permit (license), but in 2000 the licensing of such services was canceled, as a result of this any natural or legal person in the country is free to engage in the activity.
Currently, there are about 40 Internet service providers in the country, of which only three are state agencies (Aztelekomnet, Bakinternet and Azdatakom).
ISPs operate in a healthy competition and a free market environment.Companies use wired and wireless communication technologies for access to the Internet. Application of WiMax and other wireless technologies are expanded.
Connection of the country to the international Internet network is provided by two private companies (Delta Telekom and Azertelekom), which creates an alternative choice for ISPs.
All three mobile operators in the country provide its subscribers with high speed internet access and provide 3G services. In general, if we take into account the fact that mobile penetration in Azerbaijan exceeded 100%, then we can actually say that every person has access to the Internet.
The broadband access to the Internet in the country started in 2006, and in recent years there has been significant growth in the number of broadband internet users.
The main reason for this is the result of the execution of public policies carried out for the development of ICT sector in the country, the expansion of e-government projects, increasing the role of the Internet in rendering of services.

Internet Service Providers

Are there ISPs available?

(Yes / No)

yes

Private or Government

Government & Private

Dial-up only (Yes / No)

No

Approximate Rates

Dial-up:

10 Hours = 1.00 Manat , 50 Hours = 3.00 Manat , 1 Month unlimited = 7 Manat , 1 Year unlimited = 70 Manat

Broadband:

10Gbps 

Max leasable 'dedicated' bandwidth

10Gbps 

For information on ISP Provider contact details, please see the following links:

ISP Providers 1

ISP Providers 2

ISP Providers 3

ISP Providers 4

4.8 Azerbaijan Additional Service Provision Contact List