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Introduction and overview

Despite strong economic growth and a steady decline in poverty in Bangladesh over the past decade, natural disasters regularly cause serious damage to the country’s infrastructure and agricultural sectors, severely affecting food access and food availability for the poor and vulnerable. As 80 percent of Bangladesh’s population lives in rural areas and around 53 percent of the rural population is classified as poor, climate shocks and stresses have particularly negative implications for their food, livelihood security and welfare. In Bangladesh a total 36 million MT of rice and around 2.6 million MT of wheat are produced in a year. More over some times during crisis more food grains are also imported to meet emergency situations. For safely storing the food grains, proper food storage capacity needs to be increased, for which the govt is working. At present, the total storage capacity of government warehouses and silos is around 2.1 million MT and this capacity will be increased to 2.7 million MT by 2020 and around 3 million MT by 2025. Moreover there are some private warehouses for storage on rental basis.

 

Government institutions on food and storage

The public food operation of Bangladesh is based on a set of policies and an organizational structure designed to carry out these policies. The Director General of Food (DGF) under the ministry of food is the primary organization consists of a number of branches entrusted with the task of procurement, storage, movement and distribution of food.

As a price stabiliser Public Food Distribution System (PFDS) acts as a buffer stock agency, buying paddy, rice and wheat when prices are low and later supplying that food grain to the market when prices are high. The GoB uses their PFDS network to transport the grain from the Silo or central storage deports (CSDs)  to the local supply  deports (LSDs).  As per UNDAF, WFP also using these GoB’s PFDS system for managemet of their cereal food commodities. The lack of storage capacity in areas prone to natural disasters may result in delayed response to relief distribution.  Improved processing system can produce higher output and reduce the storage, transit and handling losses as well as reduce post-harvest losses.

Storage plays the key role in the entire process of procurement. Under given situations of price and supplies, the level of procurement is functionally related to that of the storage facilities. Disparities between capacity utilisation at CSD and LSDs stem from the high demand for local transport. Capacity utilization and stock turnover vary considerably from season to season as warehouses are more fully and often over utilized during the height of the domestic procurement drive but remain relatively underutilized the rest of the year, taking them available to relief agencies.

List of Officers at the office of DG Food who are responsible for Management and operation of country's overall food system, Implementation of national food policy strategies and Establishment of dependable national food security system in the country along with meeting the emergency food requirement.


Name

Designation

Contact No

Email

Mr. Sarwar Mahmud

Director General (Additional Secretary)

Phone: +88-02-9584834

Fax: +88-02-9556067

dg@dgfood.gov.bd

Mr. Md. Harun-Ar-Rashid

Personal Secretary to DG

Phone: +88-02-9556064


Mr. Md. Abdul Aziz Molla

Additional Director General

Phone: +88-02-9561871

Mobile: 01937-087098

 adg@dgfood.gov.bd

Mr. Parimal Chandra Sarker

Director (Admin)

Mobile: 01715-057088

dadm@dgfood.gov.bd

Mr. Mohammad Faruk Hossain

Additional Director

Phone: +88-02-9583899

Mobile: 01921177554

adl.adm@dgfood.gov.bd

Mr. Anisuzzzaman

Director (Procurement)

Phone: +88-02-9550261

Mobile: 01715122721

dproc@dgfood.gov.bd

Mr. Md. Abdus Salam

Addl. Director

(Procurement)

Phone: +88-02-9556302

Mobile: 01711-374674

adl.proc@dgfood.gov.bd

Mr. Saiful Kabir Khan

Deputy Director (EP)

Phone: +88-02-9558166

Mobile: 01914-218205

dd.ep@dgfood.gov.bd

Alamgir Kabir

Deputy Director (IP)

Procurement

Phone: +88-02-9556197

Mobile: 01712-110889

akbir.findu@gmail.com

Mr. Abdullah Al Mamun

Director (Mov, Storage and Silo Division)

Phone: +88-02-9550276

Mobile: 01713-202100

dmss@dgfood.gov.bd

Mr. Utpal Kumar Shaha


Addl. Director (Mov Storage & Silo)

Phone: +88-02-9550270

Mobile: 01711-483894

adl.move@dgfood.gov.bd

Mr. Md. Selimul Azam

Deputy Director (Mov, Storage and Silo Division)

Phone: +88-02-9550270

Mobile: 01711-191815


Mr. Md. Nazim Uddin

Deputy Director (Mov, Storage and Silo Division)

Phone: 88-02-47120082

Mobile: 01718-064266

dd.silo@dgfood.gov.bd

Mr. Amjad Hossain

Director, Supply Distribution and Marketing (SDM)

Phone: 88-02-9556075

Mobile: 01718957839

dsdm@dgfood.gov.bd

Mr. Harun Ur Rashid

Deputy Director, SDM

Phone: 88-02-9556075

Mobile: 01734718817

dd.supply@dgfood.gov.bd

 

Regional and district controller of food

Dhaka Region

Sl. No

Name & Designation

Office Phone

E-mail

 1.

Mr. Md. Jamal Hossain, RCF, Dhaka

02-7452983

rcf.dhk@dgfood.gov.bd

2.

Mr. Md. Main Uddin

DCF, Dhaka

02-7452914

dcf.dhk@dgfood.gov.bd

 3. 

Mr. Md. Sirajul Islam

DCF, Narayangonj

02-7634652

dcf.ngj@dgfood.gov.bd

4.

Mr. Md. Jahangir Alam (A.C.)

DCF, Narshindi

02-9462614

dcf.nsd@dgfood.gov.bd

5.

Mr. Md. Abu Bakar (In Charge)

DCF, Munshigonj

0691-7611130

dcf.mng@dgfood.gov.bd

 6. 

Mr. Md. Zahirul Islam Khan 

DCF, Gazipur

02-9262439

dcf.gzp@dgfood.gov.bd

 7. 

Mr. Md. Kamal Hossain

DCF, Manikgonj

0651-7710399

dcf.mnk@dgfood.gov.bd

8.

Mr. Md. Jahangir Alam

DCF, Mymensing

091-64359

dcf.myn@dgfood.gov.bd

9.

Mr. Ms. Suraya Khatun

DCF, Netrokona

0951-61470

dcf.nBDT@dgfood.gov.bd

10. 

Mr. Md. Mahabubur Rahman Khan

DCF, Jamalpur

0981-63124

dcf.jmp@dgfood.gov.bd 

11.

Mr. Md. Forhath Khandokar 

DCF, Sherpur

0931-61348

dcf.spr@dgfood.gov.bd 

 12.  

Mr. Md. Kamal Hossain

DCF, Tangail

0921-64018

dcf.tgl@dgfood.gov.bd 

13.

Mr. Mojibur Rahman

DCF, Rajbari

0641-65535

dcf.rjb@dgfood.gov.bd

14. 

Mr. Md. Tazul Islam (self-pay)

DCF, Faridpur

0631-63096

dcf.fdr@dgfood.gov.bd

15.

Mr. Saifur Rahman (A. C.)

DCF, Gopalgonj

0668-55370

dcf.gpl@dgfood.gov.bd 

16.

Mr. Saifur Rahman

DCF, Madaripur

0661-62317

dcf.mdr@dgfood.gov.bd 

17.

Mr.  Nur E Alam Siddiqiue

DCF, Shariatpur

0601-61636

dcf.srp@dgfood.gov.bd 

18. 

Mr. Mohammad Tanvir Hossain

DCF, Kishorgonj

0941-61788

dcf.ksj@dgfood.gov.bd

Barisal Region

1.

Mr. Reza Mohammad Mohsin

RCF, Barishal

0431-61012

0431-61013

rcf.bsl@dgfood.gov.bd

2.

Mr. Md. Moshiur Rahman

DCF, Barishal

0431-2175403

dcf.bsl@dgfood.gov.bd

3.

Mr. Md. Nazmul Hossain

DCF, Jhalakati

0498-63252

dcf.jkt@dgfood.gov.bd

 4.

Mr. Moklech AL Amin

DCF, Patuakhali

0441-62414

dcf.pBDT@dgfood.gov.bd

5.

Mr. Sonchit Chakma

DCF, Perojpur

0461-62519

dcf.prj@dgfood.gov.bd

 6.

Mr. Md. Shahidul Islam

DCF, Borguna

0448-62309

dcf.brg@dgfood.gov.bd

Chattogram Region

1. 

Mr. Md. Jamal Hossain, RCF, Chattogram

031-613112,

031-637053

rcf.ctg@dgfood.gov.bd

2.

Mr. Abu Nayeem Md. Shafiul Alam

DCF, Chattogram

031-637219

dcf.ctg@dgfood.gov.bd

3. 

Mr. S M Tahsinul Hoq (c.c)

DCF, Coxs bazaar

0341-63311

0341-64255

dcf.cxb@dgfood.gov.bd

4.

Mr. SUMAYIA NAJNIN (c.c.)

DCF, Rangamati

0351-62331

dcf.rgt@dgfood.gov.bd

5.

Mr. Md. Ashraful Alam

DCF, Khagrachari

0371-61860

dcf.kgr@dgfood.gov.bd

6.

Mr. Noyon Joti Chakma (A.C.) 

DCF, Bandarban

0361-62558

dcf.bbn@dgfood.gov.bd

7.

 DCF, Noakhali

0321-61057

dcf.nkl@dgfood.gov.bd

8.

Mr. Nayan Joti Chakma (Addl)

DCF, Laxmipur

0381-62566

dcf.lxm@dgfood.gov.bd

9.

Mr. S M Kaisar Ali (Addl)

DCF, Feni

0331-74025

dcf.fni@dgfood.gov.bd

10.

Mr. S. M Kaisar Ali

DCF, Cumilla

081-64655

dcf.cml@dgfood.gov.bd

11.

Mr. Subir Nath Chowdhury

DCF, Brahmonbaria

0851-58232

dcf.bbr@dgfood.gov.bd

12.

Mr. Subhash Chandra Nam (AC)

DCF, Chandpur

0841-63160

dcf.cdr@dgfood.gov.bd

Khulna Region

1.  

Mr. Md. Mahabubur Rahman

RCF, Khulna

041-762398

rcf.kln@dgfood.gov.bd 

2.

Mr. Muhammad Tanvir Rahman

DCF, Khulna

041-2830084

dcf.kln@dgfood.gov.bd

3.

Mr. A K M Shahidul Haque (Acting)

DCF, Bagerhat

0468-62257

dcf.bgt@dgfood.gov.bd 

4.

Mr. Md. Zakir Hossain

DCF, SaBDThira

0471-63219

dcf.sBDT@dgfood.gov.bd

5.

Mr. Manwar Hossain (In Charge)

DCF, Kushtia

071-61918

dcf.kst@dgfood.gov.bd

 6.

Mr. Md. Razaul Karim (In Charge)

DCF, Chuadanga

0761-63150

dcf.cdg@dgfood.gov.bd

7.

Mr. Md. Abdul Hamin Biswash

DCF, Meherpur

0791-62320

dcf.mpr@dgfood.gov.bd

8.

Mr. Md Liakot Hossain

DCF, Jashore

0421-65122

dcf.jsr@dgfood.gov.bd

9.

Mr. Nakib Sad Saiful Islam

DCF, Jhenaidah

0451-63209

dcf.jnd@dgfood.gov.bd

10.

Mr. Md. Main-Ul-Islam (Incharge)

DCF, Magura

0488-62411

dcf.mgr@dgfood.gov.bd


 11.

Mr. Monotosh Kunar Mojumdar (Acting)

DCF, Narail

0481-62316

dcf.nrl@dgfood.gov.bd

Rajshahi Region

1.

Mr. Md. Moniruzzaman

RCF, Rajshahi

0721-772656

0721-776340

rcf.rjs@dgfood.gov.bd 

2. 

Mr. Md Nazmul Haque Bhuiyan

DCF, Rajshahi

0721-774821

dcf.rjs@dgfood.gov.bd

3.

Mr. G. M. Faruk Hossain Patwary

DCF, Noagaon

0741-62485

dcf.ngn@dgfood.gov.bd

4. 

Mr. Md Shafiqul Islam 

DCF, Natore

0771-62608

dcf.ntr@dgfood.gov.bd

5.

Mr. Md. Reajur Rahman Raju 

DCF, Chapainawabganj

0781-52473

dcf.nbj@dgfood.gov.bd

6.

Mr. Iqbal Bahar Chowdhury

DCF, Pabna

0731-66135

dcf.pbn@dgfood.gov.bd

7.

Mr. Md. Mizanur Rahman

DCF, Sirajganj

0751-62178

dcf.srj@dgfood.gov.bd

8.

Mr. Md. Monirul Islam 

DCF, Joypurhat

0571-62367

dcf.jpt@dgfood.gov.bd

9. 

Mr. S M Saiful Islam

DCF, Bogura

051-66015

dcf.bgr@dgfood.gov.bd

Rangpur Region

1.

Mr. Md. Raihanul Kabir

RCF, Rangpur

0521-52140

rcf.rng@dgfood.gov.bd

2.

Mr. Md. Abdul Kader

DCF, Rangpur

0521-62282

dcf.rng@dgfood.gov.bd

Web: http://food.rangpur.gov.bd/

3. 

Mr. Md. Zahirul Islam

DCF, Gaibanda

0541-61593

dcf.gbn@dgfood.gov.bd

Website: http://food.gaibandha.gov.bd/

4.

Mr. Kazi Saifuddin (A.R)

DCF, Lalmonirhat

0591-61406

dcf.lmt@dgfood.gov.bd

Website: http://food.lalmonirhat.gov.bd/

5.

Mr. Md. Mohibul Hoq

DCF, Kurigram

0581-61453

dcf.krm@dgfood.gov.bd

Website: http://food.kurigram.gov.bd/

6. 

Mr. Kazi Saifuddin 

DCF, Nilphamari

0551-61448

dcf.nlf@dgfood.gov.bd

Website: http://food.nilphamari.gov.bd/

7.

Mr. Md. Ashrafuzzaman

DCF, Dinajpur

0531-65066

dcf.dnj@dgfood.gov.bd

Website: http://food.dinajpur.gov.bd/

8.

Mr. Mohammad. Babul Hossain 

DCF, Thakurgaon

0561-52030

dcf.BDTg@dgfood.gov.bd

Website: http://food.thakurgaon.gov.bd/

9.

Mr. Mohammad Babul Hossain (Addl)

DCF, Panchgor

0568-61311

dcf.png@dgfood.gov.bd

Website: http://food.panchagarh.gov.bd/

Sylhet Region

1.

Mr. Mohammad Mamunur Rashid 

RCF, Sylhet

0821-840836

rcf.slt@dgfood.gov.bd

 2.

Mr. Md Mizanur Rahman

DCF, Sylhet

0821-717143

dcf.slt@dgfood.gov.bd


3.

Mr. Manoj Kanti Das Chowdhury

DCF, Moulvibazar

0861-52210

dcf.mlb@dgfood.gov.bd

4.

Mr.  Md. Abdus Salam (CC)

DCF, Hobigonj

0831-62322

dcf.hbj@dgfood.gov.bd

5.

Mr. Md. Zakaria Mostafa (CC)

DCF, Sunamgonj

0871-61590

dcf.snj@dgfood.gov.bd


Officers' information (Silos)

Ashugonj

Sl. No

Name & Designation

Office Phone

E-mail

 1.

Mr. Mohammad Anwar Hossain

Silo Superintendent, Ashugonj

08528-74202, 

Fax: 08528-74499

silo.asn@dgfood.gov.bd 

2.

Mr. Khondakar Serajus Saleqin

Maintenance Engineer

08528-74203,

Fax: 08528-74499

saleqin.cuetme03@gmail.com

Chattogram

1.

Mr. Mohammad Asaduzzaman

Silo Superintendent, Chattogram

031-2501252 Fax: 031-2501255

silo.ctg@dgfood.gov.bd

2.

Mohammad Ashfaqur Rahman

Assistant Maintenance Engineer

 031-2501253

silo.ctg@dgfood.gov.bd

Narayangonj

1.

Mr. Md. Tajol Islam 

Silo Superintendent, Narayangonj

02-7693140

 Fax: 02-7694175 

silo.ngj@dgfood.gov.bd


2.

Rakibul Hasan

Maintenance Engineer

02-7693012


silo.ngj@dgfood.gov.bd

Shantahar, Bogura

1.

Mr. Mohammad Faizullah Khan Shiblee

Silo Superintendent, Santahar

0741-69483

silo.stu@dgfood.gov.bd

Khulna and Mongla

1.

Mr. Arup Kumar Mishra

Silo Superintendent (Khulna)

(Addl Charge-Mongla)

041-774528

silo.kln@dgfood.gov. (Khulna)

silo.mongla@dgfood.gov.bd (Mongla)

 

Various storage types

Following types of storage system are now prevailing in the country:

  1. Homestead storage.
  2. Trade level storage.
  3. Mill cum trade level storage.
  4. Automatic milling storage.
  5. Government storage for buffer stock.
  6. Modern storage system.

While storage facilities and functions assume great importance, particularly in the case of subsistence crop, little is known about the various aspects of the initial storage of rice and paddy. The big rice-millers have large storage godowns in their compounds. They perform a considerable part of this function in the area they are located. The traders at the primary market do not have any storage facilities.


BADC warehouse and cold storage with capacity           

Sl

District /Place

Storage area (sq ft)

Capacity (MT)

Remarks

Cold Storage for Fish, Fruit and Vegetables

1.

Dhaka Airport

-

120


2.

Jhumjhumpur, Jashore

-

50


3. 

Sholoshohor, Chattogram

-

50


4.

Sayedpur, Cumilla

-

50


5.

Chitla, Meherpur

3500

50

Dehumidified

6.

Monirampur, Jashore

3500

70

Dehumidified

7. 

Nashipur, Dinajpur

2500

100

Dehumidified

8.

Kashimpur, Gajipur

13520

1000


9.

Sherpur

11224

1000


10.

Kishorganj

11520

1000


11.

Shrimongol, Moulovi Bazar

8405

1000


12.

Bogura

6400

1000


13.

Faridpur

9600

1000


14.

Jashore

9600

1000


15.

Rangpur

12800

1000


16.

Rajshahi

10310

1000


17.

Thakurgaon

10800

1000


18.

Baradi, Meherpur

9600

1000


19.

Noshipur, Dinajpur

9600

1000


20.

Chandpur

8595

1000


21.

Kushtia

12000

1200


22.

Dhonbari, Tangail

20000

6000


23.

Domar, Nilfamari

9400

1500


24.

Homna, Cumilla

9600

1000


25.

Gopalgonj

580

50

Dehumidified

26.

Naogaon

775

40

Dehumidified

General Storage/Warehouse

27.

Citla,Meherpur

8600

340


28.

Nashipur, Dinajpur

8250

300


29.

Bogura, Rajshahi

6950

400


30.

Chuadanga

58400

7300


31.

Tangail

66,487.5

7,950


32.

Rangpur

40,000

5000


33.

Dinajpur

38400

4800


34.

Faridpur

39200

4900


35.

Chattogram

18,779

2350


36.

Cumilla

36,900

4,200


37.

Pabna

36,000

4,500


38.

Thakurgaon

38,400

4,800


39.

Jashore

30,400

3,800


40.

Bogura

30,400

3800


41.

Meherpur

14,800

1,850


42.

Rajshahi

29,600

3,700


43.

Dhaka

43,131

4,880


44.

Hobiganj

14,400

1,800


45.

Barisal

6,400

800


46.

Narayanganj

268.75

25


47.

Norsingdi

537.5

50


48.

Shripur

537.5

50


49.

Kaliganj

215

20


50.

Gajipur

537.5

50


51.

Manikganj

1612.5

150


52.

Munsiganj

3225

300


53.

Mymensingh 

11,825

1,100


54.

Muktagacha

2,150

200


55.

Goforgaon

537.5

50


56.

Isshorganj

537.5

50


57.

Nandail

4300

400


58.

Fulpur

4300

400


59.

Jamalpur

5375

500


60.

Melandoho

537.5

50


61.

Sherpur

2,150

200


62.

Kishorganj

5,590

520


63.

Pakundia

1,075

100


64.

Netrokona

1,612.5

150


65.

Faridpur

13,625

1,250


66.

Madaripur

1,612.5

150


67.

Shoriyatpur

1,612.5

150


68.

Rajbari

537.5

50


69.

Gopalganj

537.5

50


70.

Cox’s Bazar

4,300

400


71.

Rangamati

1,075

100


72.

Bandorban

1,075

100


73.

Thanchi

215

20


74.

Lama

215

20


75.

Khagrachori

2,150

200


76.

Noakhali

12,900

1,200


77.

Lakshmipur

537.5

50


78.

Feni

2,150

200


79.

Debidwar

2,150

200


80.

Borura

2,150

200


81.

Daudkandi

4,300

400


82.

Burichong

215

20


83.

Laksam

4,300

400


84.

Chouddogram

4,300

400


85.

B. Baria

5,750

530


86.

Hajiganj

430

40


87.

Chandpur

5,375

500


88.

Sylhet

11,825

1,400


89.

Moulovibazar

2,150

200


90.

Hobiganj

537.5

50


91.

Sunamganj

537.5

50


92.

Rajshahi

10,750

1,000


93.

Boraigram

2,150

200


94.

Chapai Nobabganj

537.5

50


95.

Nowga

4,300

400


96.

Natore

2,150

200


97.

Pabna

7,525

700


98.

Sirajganj

5,375

500


99.

Bogura

7,632.4

710


100.

Joypurhat

2,150

200


101.

Rangpur

15,050

1,400


102.

Pirganj

1,075

100


103.

Polashbari

3,225

300


104.

Gobindoganj

3,225

300


105.

Pirgacha

2,150

200


106.

Sayedpur

215

20


107.

Nilfamari

1,075

100


108.

Gaibandha

1,075

100


109.

Ulipur

2,150

200


110.

Nageshwari

752.5

70


111.

Kurigram

2,150

200


112.

Lalmonirhat

1,290

120


113.

Dinajpur

1,075

100


114.

Parbotipur

1,075

100


115.

Birganj

2,150

200


116.

Thakurgaon

3,225

300


117.

Ponchogar

2,150

200


118.

Khulna

9,137.5

850


119.

Bagerhat

537.5

50


120.

Kaliganj

2,150

200


121.

SaBDThira

537.5

50


122.

Jashore

19,550

2000


123.

Keshabpur

2,150

200


124.

Moheshpur

537.5

50


125.

Jhinaidah

1,290

120


126.

Shripur

215

20


127.

Magura

1,612.5

150


128.

Norail

537.5

50


129.

Kushtia

6,450

600


130.

Meherpur

537.5

50


131.

Damurhuda

537.5

50


132.

Jibon Nogor

537.5

50


133.

Chuadanga

1,612.5

150


134.

Barisal

12,900

1,200


135.

Pirojpur

161.25

15


136.

Bhola

3,225

300


137.

Potuakhali

4,300

400


138.

Borguna

215

20


139.

Mothura

-

500


140.

Gokulnagar

-

650


141.

Korincha

-

625


142.

Kushadanga

-

750


143.

Sadhuhati

-

515


144.

Pathila

-

600


145.

Nurnagar

-

100


146.

Tebunia

-

700


147.

Meherpur

-

700


148.

Modhupur

-

700


149.

Kashimpur

-

1100


150.

Netrokona

-

200


151.

Pangsha

-

175


152.

Tambulkhana

-

300


153.

Lakutia

-

100


154.

Panchgachiya

-

150


155.

Itakhola

-

200


156.

Jhilongja

-

300


157.

Thakurgaon

-

195


158.

Nilphamari

-

300


159.

Boalia

-

50


160.

Modhupur, Tangail

7749

950


161.

Jamalpur

8896

775


162.

Chuadanga

32258

3000


163.

Meherpur

2689

250


164.

Jashore

13119

1400


165.

Tebunia, Pabna

1499

100


166.

Rajshahi

5220

400


167.

Bogura

3226

300


168.

Rangpur

1764

700


169.

Dinajpur

54226

200


170.

Thakurgaon

9753

850


171.

Mymensingh

29025

2700


172.

Chuadanga

51278

4770


173.

Rangpur

30638

2750


174.

Bogura

25370

2360


175.

Feni

27681

2575


176.

Sylhet

23435

2180


177.

SaBDThira

21178

1970


178.

Thakurgaon

35475

3300


179.

Gajipur

33863

3150


180.

Jamalpur

36013

3350


181.

Kishorganj

27950

2600


182.

Netrokona

31175

2900


183.

Nokla, Sherpur

4312

200


184.

Gopalgonj

4110

950


185.

Ramu, Cox’s Bazar

3932

350


186.

Naoga

1925

120


187.

Potuakhali

525

50


188.

Bhola

4100

200


189.

Kulaura, Moulovi Bazar

1350

100


190.

Modhupur, Tangail

10580

1000


191.

Tangail

10580

1000


192.

Kishorganj

10580

1000


193.

Gabtoli, Dhaka

5057

107


194.

Amjhupi, Meherpur

2000

30


195.

Alamnagar, Rangpur

3771

45



Storage capacity of public sector

Storage facilities in Govt CSDs, LSDs and Silos

Bangladesh has adequate storage facilities all across the country for storing various types of food grains. These warehouses have huge storage spaces which are often underutilized during any given month or season of the year. But some of them are old which needs to be renovated.

For storage of food grains, there are total 654 storage facilities of different types (LSD-635, CSD-12, Silo-6 and 1 Multi-purpose Warehouse) with a total capacity of  approximate 21,00,000 MT of rice and. These warehouses have good facilities in terms of equipment, skilled labour, stacking facilities, fumigation capacities at affordable prices, ventilation, augmented storage facilities, parking, security. In addition, 8 more Modern Silos and 158 LSDs with a total capacity of 6,40,000 MT are being constructed which is expected to be completed by 2020. The present district wise Food grain Storage Capacity (MT) at various LSDs, CDSs and Silos are shown below:

 

District wise Food grain Storage Capacity (MT)

District

LSD

CSD

Silo

All Types

District

LSD

CSD

Silo

All Types

No

Capacity

No

Capacity

No

Capacity

No

Capacity

No.

Capacity

No.

Capacity

No.

Capacity

No.

Capacity

Dinajpur

25

66500

1

20500



26

87000

Mymensingh

19

36500

1

30000



20

66500

Thakurgaon

12

43250





12

43250

Jamalpur

8

17300





8

17300

Panchagarh

8

22500





8

22500

Netrokona

14

19000





14

19000

Rangpur

9

20000





9

20000

Sherpur

5

20000





5

20000

Lalmonirhat

7

16500





7

16500

Mymensingh D

46

92800

1

30000

 

 

47

122800

Kurigram

9

25000





9

25000

Manikganj

8

14000





8

14000

Gaibandha

11

30250





11

30250

Dhaka

5

6250

2

40500



7

46750

Nilphamari

7

25000





7

25000

Narosingdi

7

16250





7

16250

Rangpur Div

88

249000

1

20500

0

0

89

269500

Kishoreganj

14

28750





14

28750

Bogura

23

60000

1

54250

1

25000

23

139250

Narayanganj

4

4300

 1

 11700

 1

 50000

6

66000

Joypurhat

7

28100





7

28100

Munshiganj

7

16430





7

16430

Rajshahi

12

25850





12

25850

Tangail

14

34618





14

34618

Natore

7

10000





7

10000

Rajbari

4

10500





4

10500

Noagaon

19

39250





19

39250

Faridpur

8

15500





8

15500

Nowabganj

7

19500





7

19500

Gopalganj

6

11500





6

11500

Pabna

10

30000

1

52500



11

82500

Madaripur

7

19000





7

19000

Sirajganj

10

32500





10

32500

Shariatpur

6

11000





6

11000

Rajshahi Div

95

245200

2

106750

1

25000

98

376950

Gazipur

5

9000





5

9000

Khulna

8

8000

2

136900

1

800

11

145700

Dhaka Div.

95

197008

3

52200

1

50000

99

299208

Bagerhat

9

16000



 1

 50000

10

66000

Cox's bazar

10

22000





10

22000

SaBDThira

11

17500





11

17500

Rangamati

13

7000





13

7000

Kushtia

8

15500





8

15500

Khagrachari

11

8250





11

8250

Chuadanga

5

15250





5

15250

Banderban

8

5000





8

5000

Meherpur

3

5000





3

5000

Noakhali

11

23000





11

23000

Jashore

10

19000





10

19000

Laxipur

6

11500





6

11500

Jhenidah

9

17500





9

17500

Feni

6

12750





6

12750

Megura

6

10000





6

10000

Cumilla

17

39000





17

39000

Narail

5

7500





5

7500

B. Baria

10

17500



1

50000

10

67500

Khulna Div.

74

131250

2

136900

1

800

77

318950

Chandpur

7

8000

1

7000



7

15000

Barisal

10

15500

1

22780



11

38280

Chottagram

16

22500

2

173624

1

100000

19

296124

Jhalakathi

4

9125





4

9125

Chottagram Di

115

176500

3

180624

2

150000

120

507124

Perojpur

8

16000





8

16000

Moulvibazar

10

11000





10

11000

Bhola

7

15250





7

15250

Habiganj

13

20250





13

20250

Patuakhali

8

17500





8

17500

Sunamganj

14

21400





14

21400

Barguna

6

13000





6

13000

Sylhet

15

17050





15

17050

Barisal Div.

43

86375

1

22780

0

0

44

109155

Sylhet Div.

52

69700

0

0

0

0

52

69700

 

LSD- 635

Capacity- 1247833

CSD-12

Capacity-549754

Silo- 6

Capacity-275800

Multi- Warehouse-1

Capacity-50,000

 Total Storage -654

 Capacity-2,123,387

 

Storage and warehouse facilities of BADC

Bangladesh Agricultural Development Corporation (BADC) under the Agricultural Ministry has developed a huge warehouse network all over the country for preservation of food stuff specially frozen Fish, various Seed, Fruits and Vegetables. They use these warehouses for their own requirement at the same time rent them on commercial basis to different organizations when ever deemed suitable or to meet urgent requirements. For any requirement they can be contacted at :

Bangladesh Agricultural Development Corporation (BADC)
Krishi Bhaban 49-51, Dilkusha Commercial Area
Dhaka-1000

Phone: PABX: 9556080-7 & Fax: 88-02-9564357
E-mail: info@badc.gov.bd
Website: www.badc.gov.bd

Modern Food Storage Facilities Project

Despite strong economic growth and a steady decline in poverty in Bangladesh over the past decade, natural disasters regularly cause serious damage to the country’s infrastructure and agricultural sectors, severely affecting food access and food availability for the poor and vulnerable. As 80 percent of Bangladesh’s population lives in rural areas and around 53 percent of the rural population is classified as poor, climate shocks and stresses have particularly negative implications for their food, livelihood security, and welfare.

Government has received an IDA credit toward the costs of the Modern Food Storage Facilities Project (MFSP), being implemented by the Directorate General of Food, Ministry of Food. The modern food storage facilities could considerably improve the efficacy of the government’s emergency response and recovery efforts in disaster-prone areas and could enhance the efficiency of its Public Food Distribution System. Modern storage facilities in different strategic locations across the country will allow grain to be kept in bulk for up to 2/3 years in better conditions relative to the godowns used currently, with reduced grain losses and enhanced nutritional value of the grain distributed. At least 10 million people (or some 25 percent of the population living in the project area) are expected to directly or indirectly benefit from the project, primarily vulnerable and poor people in areas regularly affected by floods and cyclones. About 500,000 households (around 2.5 million people) will directly benefit from facilitated access to household silos, half of which will be women and children.

With strengthened capacity for improving stock management in the modern silos, and comprehensive analyses for enhancing the overall policy framework on strategic grain reserves, GoB will be able to make sound and informed decisions as it reconciles the following 3 strategic objectives that impact the domestic food market:

  • Supporting the poor and vulnerable through effective Social Safety Net programs
  • Improving the country’s disaster preparedness to meet food security needs caused by disaster-induced food shortages
  • Devising non-distortive market interventions for food price stabilization, mainly for coarse grain consumed by the poor and vulnerable.

Specific objectives of the project

The overall project development objective is to increase the grain reserve available to households to meet their post-disaster needs and improve the efficiency of grain storage management.

  • Develop 8 Silo complex of capacity 5.36 lakh MT
  • Facilitate households’ access to domestic silos to ensure household level food security (5 Lakh)
  • Reduce storage losses
  • Adopt the best suited technology for preservation of food grain quality, quantity and nutritional level
  • Ensure safe storage of food grain during calamities
  • Ensure Better monitoring and improved governance and management of food stocks.

Strategic sites for silo with capacity

Sl

Site

No. of Bins

Bin Size (in feet)

Bin capacity (MT)

Silo capacity (MT)

1

Barisal

16

60 D X 40 H

3,000

48,000

2

Narayanganj

16

60 D X 40 H

3,000

48,000

3

Dhaka

16

60 D X 40 H

3,000

48,000

4

Ashuganj

35

60 D X 60 H

3,000

105,000

5

Mymensingh

16

60 D X 40 H

3,000

48,000

6

Maheshwarpasha (Wheat)

6

90 D X 78 H

12,700

76,200

7

Chattogram (Wheat)

9

90 D X 78 H

12,700

114,300

8

Madhupur

16

60 D X 40 H

3,000

48,000


Total

130 Bins

 

 

535,500 MT

Household silos 

Under the 2007 Emergency Cyclone Recovery and Reconstruction Project (ECRRP, P111272), household-level silos or grain storage bins were developed in Bangladesh. These units are specially designed 70-liter, food-grade plastic bins tested to ensure that chemical contaminants do not migrate into the stored food. They hold about 40kg of paddy equipped with a watertight lid, preventing water intrusion from surges and floods. Provision of home storage units under ECRRP has been extremely successful; under FAO coordination some 20,000 units were distributed. Based on the lessons learned from the ECRRP, this project’s investment in small-scale storage at the rural household level is expected to bring important benefits to the farming community – in the form of safer storage of rice, seed and the enhanced capacity of affected households to have seed readily available for subsequent planting seasons.

 

Warehouse/storage facilities in private sector

Bangladesh is a significant exporter of readymade garments, frozen fish, vegetables and shrimps to different destinations of the world for which the private sector has developed a strong and efficient right-on-time logistics chain, including cold-chain. Hundreds of Shipping Agents, CC & FF companies, ICD management companies, are operational in the country and most of them – being affiliate to international logistics companies do provide high quality services fitting with the international standards (tracking, storage, transport, deliveries). All those companies are able to provide warehousing services. This being said, as part of a right on time logistics chain, they are more used to short term storage (the time necessary to complete the clearance and shipping procedures), than for a longer period, usually used by INGOs for their contingency stock for example.

Now a day lots of private entrepreneurs are constructing sheds and warehouses to facilitate storage arrangements of various items. They are renting it out to the general people including NGOs.


Storage facilities of WFP

Generally, WFP avails the storage facilities of the Government or private sources if the alternatives are not available at the site of operation. Sometimes, there being no established storage facilities in remote operational areas different INGOs build temporary storage arrangements for own use and also for the use of Partners. WFP has its own such Storage arrangements at the Rohingya Camp area at Cox’s Bazar which they are sharing with the partners. Some of these types of Warehouse facilities are listed below:

Storage facilities of WFP at Cox’s Bazar

Chattogram transhipment point for Cox’s Bazar operation

Distance

Latitude: 22.3278 N 22°19'40.08667" Longitude :91.78128 E 91°46'52.61096"

Chattogram Port - distance from Cox's Bazar 175 km, 5-6 h drive

Chattogram Port - distance from Dhaka 245 km or 10 -15 h drive. - distance to WFP Storage Facility :5 km

Names (Government/ WFP)

WFP Chattogram Hub (government name WH No. 29,30,31 & 68, WFP LESS Name WH no. 1,2,3,4)

Chattogram unit 33 (GoB name) WFP name WH No. 5

Chattogram unit 34 (GoB name) WFP name WH No.6)

Number of Unit

6

1

1

Storage Capacity for Bag (MT)

5,500

750

750

Storage Capacity for Non-Bags (MT)

4,000

500

500

Storage Capacity Non-Bags MIX with bag commodities

3,500

550

550

Size

WH1. L 29.6 x W 23.5, X 4             WH 2 L 33.5 x W 20.1 x 4                        WH 3 L 34.4 x W 20.1 x 4                  WH 4 L 34.4 x W 20.1 x  4

WH 4 L 34.4 x W 20.1 x  4

WH 4 L 34.4 x W 20.1 x  4

L 45 x W 12 x H 3.25

L 45 x W 12 x H 3.25

Remarks

1500 MT bag comdity+1200mt box commodity

Maduchara

Distance

Latitude: 21.22134 N 21°13'17.00076" Longitude :92.14186 E 92°8'30.70392"

7 units of MSU: 10 x 24 x 2.5

Names (Government/ WFP)

10 MSUs

Number of Unit

10

1

Storage Capacity for Bag (MT)

4,000 (400 each MSU)

Storage Capacity for Non-Bags (MT)

200 each MSU

Storage Capacity Non-Bags MIX with bag commodities

350 each MSU

Size

10 x 24 x 2,5

Remarks

HEB

Zilongza Warehouse

Distance

Latitude: 21.42526 N 21°25'30.94523" Longitude :92.01127 E 92°0'40.56302"

Names (Government/ WFP)

2 units of warehouses

Number of Unit

2

Storage Capacity for Bag (MT)

2,000

Storage Capacity for Non-Bags (MT)

1,200

Storage Capacity Non-Bags MIX with bag commodities

1600

Size

WH1. L 30,5 x W 24,4 x 3                   WH2. L 30.5 x W 24.4 x 3

Remarks

1000 MT box commodity + 400 MT bags

Uttaran Warehouse

Distance

Lat- 21.421501, Long:-91.999783

Names (Government/ WFP)

MSUs

Number of Unit

10

Storage Capacity for Bag (MT)

4,000 (400 each MSU

Storage Capacity for Non-Bags (MT)

200

Storage Capacity Non-Bags MIX with bag commodities

350

Size

10 MSU: 10x 24=1, 10 X 28= 6, 10x 32=3, Uttaran Warehouse: Address: By Pass Road - Uttaran Complex- Zilongza -Cox Bazar

TOTAL capacity

4000 MT

Cold chain

Bangladesh is predominantly an agro-based country and agriculture sector contributes about 17-18% of the GDP, employs over 45% of labour force. In the global climatic zones, Bangladesh is a tropical country where average daytime temperature ranges between 23 degrees Celsius to 34 degrees Celsius. Seasonal vegetables and fruits require storage refrigerated warehouse facilities (called as “Cold Storage”).  Many perishable products such as tomato, carrot, green chilli, beans, cauli flower, & mango needs to be preserved as around 30-40% of them get wasted due to perishability and absence of proper post-harvest storage, processing plants and transportation facilities in the season. Nevertheless, there is an acute shortage small cold storage to preserve vegetables and fruits. Unfortunately, due to inadequacy of post-harvest cold storage facilities, the farmers suffer a huge loss and damage of perishable produces and become victims of exploitation by middlemen and local wholesalers at both producers and consumers end. Therefore, to preserve them and save them from being waste, requirement of adequate number of Cold chain facilities all over the country is inevitable.

Average useful storage life of some essential items is shown in the table:


Items

Average Useful Storage Life (days) with Temparature C0

Food Product

00C

90C

220C

380C

Meat

6-10

2-4

1

<1

Fish

2-7

2-3

1

<1

Poultry

5-18

2-8

1

<1

Dry Meat and Fish

>1000

>1000

>350 but <1000

>100 but <350

Fruits

2-180

2-120

1-20

1-7

Dry Fruits

>1000

>1000

>350 but <1000

>100 but <350

Leafy Vegetables

3-20

2-10

1-7

1-3

Root Crops

90-300

50-240

7-50

2-20

Dry Seeds

>1000

>1000

>350 but <1000

>100 but <350


Cold storage facilities

In Bangladesh there are public and private cold storages facilities. Govt is gradually constructing Cold storages based on the increasing requirement. Business entities also investing in this sector for their own need also for renting it to others. Feeling the importance USAID and UNICEF is also assisting corporate bodies to construct cold storages for fruits/vegetable and pharmaceuticals. Available Cold storage facilities in the country are:

District wise number of various types of Cold storages with capacity

District

Number

Cumulative Capacity (MT)

No of Small Storage (<6000 MT)

No of Medium storage

(6000-10000 MT)

No of Large Storage (>10000 MT)

Dhaka

8

21,111

8

0

0

Narayanganj

5

25,4000

0

I

4

Jamalpur

3

12,000

3

0

0

Faridpur

3

17,800

3

0

0

Madaripur

1

6,000

1

0

0

Gazipur

1

I,000

1



Kishoreganj

5

23,300

3

2


Tangail

3

19,415

2

1


Sherpur

2

11,000

2



Manikganj

2

6,000

2



Munshiganj

73

495,251

33

30

10

Nilphamari

9

85,100

1

3

5

Kurigram

4

45,860



4

Manikganj

2

6,000

2



Munshiganj

73

495,251

33

30

I O

Nilphamari

9

85,100

1

3

5

Kurigram

4

45,860



4

Lalmonirhat

8

74,572


3

5

Rajshahi

28

308,000

3

12

13

Dinajpur

13

96,860

3

7

3

Thakurgaon

14

106,440

4

8

2

Panchagar

4

31,875


4


Gaibandha

5

41,588

1

4


Rangpur

40

435,017

7

22

1 1

Pabna

2

10,675

2



Joypurhat

14

1 16,956

5

9


Natore

4

10,500

4



Naogaon

6

25,768

6



Bogura

29

223,780

7

14

8

Chapai Nawabganj

1

5,000

1



Sirajganj

1

4,250

1



Kushtia

3

7,200

3



Jashore

10

38,588

10



Meherpur

3

10,000

3



Khulna

5

15,720

5



Barisal

1

2,000

1



SaBDThira

5

15,720

5



Barguna

1

12,000



1

Chattogram

6

18,650

4

1

1

Sylhet

3

3,800

3



Chandpur

10

42,000

8

2


Moulovibazar

3

4,600

3



Feni

1

6,960


1


Cumilla

31

128,250

24

5

2

Cox's Bazar

1

5,000

1



Habiganj

1

1,500

1



Lakxmipur

1

5,000

1



Total

373


175

129

69

 

List of cold storage facilities

There are different types of cold storages depending on the types of items to be preserved. Now a days lots of frozen fish are exported to the developed countries around the world and those exporters have their own cold storages. As Bangladesh is an ago-based society, here lots of fruits and vegetables are produced which are preserved in cold storages. To facilitate such acts the government-specially BADC and private entrepreneurs have developed Cold storages. Some of cold storage facilities of Private Owners are listed at Art 4.6.3 

Bonded warehouse facilities

Bonded warehousing means generally the facility provided to export oriented industries for importing inputs/raw materials and packaging materials without paying any duty or taxes. The National Board of Revenue (NBR) provides Bonded Warehousing benefits to a wide range of industries to encourage export-oriented industrialization and facilitate exports. Availing the bonded warehouse facility is important for the export-oriented industries, as it enhances their export competitiveness. Bonded Warehousing facility is accorded following the provisions under Sections 84-119 of the Customs Act, 1969 (Chapter 11), and various rules and orders issued from time to time by the NBR.

Categories of bonded warehouses: Depending on the types of inputs/raw materials used, the purpose of their use, and the type of exports, bonded warehouses are basically of two categories: Special bonded warehouse and General bonded warehouse.

  1. Special bonded warehousing is applicable for 100% export-oriented readymade garments industries, which include woven garments, knitwear and sweater manufacturing industries.
  2. General bonded warehousing applies to other 100% export-orient oriented industries. These include:
  3. 100% export-oriented ship building industry,
  4. Accessories industries for:
    1. Deemed exports (e.g 100% export-oriented packing/carton, label, polybag, button, hanger etc. firms).
    2. Direct exports.
  5. General Bonded Warehouse for home consumption e.g. British American Tobacco. These are basically deferred payment facility for 6 months.  Duties are paid when raw materials/goods are cleared.
  6. Diplomatic & privileged persons bonded warehouse (e.g. M/s Toss Bond (Pvt) ltd., M/s H Kabir & Co. Ltd; Biman Bangladesh Airlines; Bangladesh Parjatan Corporation). Duty free articles are sold from these bonded warehouses in foreign currency to diplomats & privileged persons residing in Bangladesh.
  7. Bonded enterprises situated in the Export Processing Zones.
  8. Bonded enterprises situated in the Economic Zones.
  9. 100% export-oriented deemed-to-deemed export industries.

Facilities enjoyed by bonded enterprises situated in the Export Processing Zones are delineated in the Customs (Export Processing Zones) Rules, 1984.

 

Bond license: In order to avail the Bonded Warehousing facility, interested enterprises will have to take a Bond License from the Customs Bond Commissionerate.

In order to obtain a bonded warehouse license, applicants need to complete a bond license application form and submit the same with necessary documents and application fee to the respective Bond Commissionerate, or any Customs, Excise and VAT Commissionerate authorized by the NBR to issue bonded warehouse license.

After receiving the Bond Licenses, licensee industries will be able to take clearance of their inputs/raw materials or packing materials imported under Back-to-Back Letter of Credit without paying any import duty or other taxes. However, the volume of these inputs and packing materials will have to remain within the limits of the entitlements referred to in their Bond Licenses. Full duty and taxes will be applicable on any amount of inputs/raw materials that exceed the entitlements referred to in the Licenses.

 Bond entitlement: Bonded warehouse facilities are subject to yearly entitlement. Yearly entitlement is allowed based on production capacity of capital machinery and previous year’s performance (i.e. export and usage of raw materials) of the bonder. However, direct exporters in the RMG sector are not required to have annual entitlement. They can import inputs/raw materials and related items based on the requirement of Utilization Declaration (UD) and Master LCs. Requirement of General Bond: Bonded warehouse license holders are needed to submit general bond of differing values to Customs in order to clear their consignments. Commissioner of Customs may increase the value of General Bond. At present, value of general bond for different types of bond license holders are as follows:

  • Deemed Exporter: BDT. 10,000,000
  • Direct exporters (Knit, Woven, Sweater): BDT. 30,000,000
  • Both Deemed and Direct Exporter: BDT. 20,000,000
  • Diplomatic, Duty Free and Duty paid Bond: BDT. 30,000,000

All the imported goods cleared under Bonded Warehouse license are stored at the bond holder's warehouses. In case of failure to export, importers are to pay duty charges and taxes for the rest of the goods imported. Bond holders are required to maintain bond registers and other documents. 

Bonding period: For export-oriented industries, bond period varies from industry to industry. Bonding periods are shown below:

Bonded warehouse typesBonding period

Special Bonded Warehouse

24 Months; Commissioner reserves the power to extend the bonding period for a maximum of 6 months.

Direct Exporter

24 Months; Commissioner reserves the power to extend the bonding period for a maximum of 6 months

 Home Consumption Bond (e.g. British American Tobacco, Hayes and Haier, Meghna, Citi group, BDT)

6 Months; Commissioner may extend the bonding period for 3 months and NBR may further extend the bonding period for 3 months

Deemed Exporter

24 Months; however, Commissioner reserves the power to extend the bonding period for a maximum of 6 months

Diplomatic and privileged persons Bonded warehouse

12 Months; Commissioner may extend bonding period for 3 months and NBR may further extend bonding period for 3 months

Ship Builders Bond 

48 Months; bonding period is extendable.


Import under UD/UP: How much inputs and packaging materials will be used in manufacturing exportable products is basically determined by the Utilization Declaration (UD) or the Utilization Permission (UP). In the case of readymade garments industries, the UD issued by Bangladesh Garments Manufacturers and Exporters Association acts as the basis. In the case of other export-oriented industries, the UP issued by the Customs Bond Commissionerate acts as the basis. This UD or UP is finally settled after the manufactured products are exported.

Bonded storage

Bangladesh has been successful in developing a number of EPZs and granting bonded warehouse status to factories producing for export. It now needs to develop supplemental bonded facilities to reduce the cost and time for delivery of the imported materials used in the production of exports. These facilities would include:

  • Off-Dock Container Yards for Inbound Containers
  • Rail ICD near Tongi
  • Truck ICDs to the South-East and North-West of Dhaka
  • A common-user customs bonded warehouse

Off-dock container yards

Off Dock Container Yards have been introduced in many countries to alleviate port congestion; they are used to store and de-stuff inbound containers and clear the cargo, these three activities are the primary cause of port congestion. However, to help ease congestion at Chattogram seaport, facilitate quick clearance of FCL (Full Container Load) cargo by allowing unstuffing/delivery from outside the port area, and facilitate trade, Government encourages the establishment of Off-Dock facilities in the form of private container freight stations (CFSs) or inland container depots (ICDs).

Eligible private sector operators are licensed as CFSs/ICDs to store selected low risk import items and empty containers and conduct Customs clearance formalities and allow unstuffing/delivery of selected categories of import consignments. These private ICDs/CFSs require to obtain permission from the National Board of Revenue, Ministry of Shipping, Chattogram Port Authority, Department of Environment and other relevant government agencies. They also need to fulfil certain conditions to get warehouse license from Customs House, such as:

  1. Location proximity (will have to be within 20 kilometers of the port).
  2. Provision of proper office for customs officials.
  3. Adequate facilities for container handling, such as fork lift, cranes, straddle carriers etc.
  4. A well-secured warehouse, and tight security system with installed close circuit television (CCTV) cameras).

 Private ICDs/CFSs perform three main functions:

  1. Handling of import containers of selected items (selected 37 low duty import items).
  2. Handling of all export containers. 
  3. Storing and handling of empty containers.

Import items eligible to be cleared through private ICDs: Customs allows the following import items to be taken to private ICDs for completion of Customs formalities there:

Rice, Wheat, Mustard seed, Waste paper, Chickpeas (chola), Pulse (dal), Raw cotton, Scrap, Animal fodder, Soybean meal/extraction, DDGS, Rice bran, Corn gluten meal , Rape seed extraction, Palm kernels, Maize, Soya beans, Hard coke, Carbon black, Marble chips, Ball clay (in bulk), Onion, Ginger, Garlic (perishable goods carried in normal dry container), Fertilizer, Soda ash, PVC resin, Staple fibre, Containerized square/round log, Dates, Sugar, Bitumen, Empty container for beverages, Marble stone, Sodium sulphate, Wood pulp and Global salt.

In taking delivery of containers to private ICDs, NoC from the concerned shipping agent and Chattogram Port Authority have to be obtained.

Handling of import consignments: Import items are scanned at the respective port gate before containers carrying such items are taken out on-chassis from Chattogram Port to respective off-docks. Import goods are physically examined at off-docks following risk management techniques. In the case of raw cotton, the application of the LMD system initiated by Chattogram Chamber of Commerce to measure weight will be conducted in the private ICDs. Customs assessment is done at Chattogram Customs House and release order is issued therefrom. Goods are unstuffed and delivered from private off-docks.

 Export formalities: Customs officials stationed at the private ICDs supervise the stuffing of export goods into containers, and where necessary, conduct physical examination. Assessment is done at Chattogram Custom House. After completing formalities at private ICD, stuffed containers are allowed to enter the port area, and on completion of the remaining formalities, shipped on board for export.

Handling of empty containers: After unstuffing and delivery of import consignments either from the port area or the private ICDs, respective shipping agents (Main Line Operator or MLO) take the empty containers to their nominated depots or CFSs for storage. Some of these are later used for stuffing of export consignment, and some are re-exported as empty containers. If the empty containers are not disposed of within the allowed time limit, these containers are liable for disposal through auction.


Rail ICD

The existing Dhaka rail ICD in Kamlapur operates more efficiently than the container yard in Chattogram Port, but its location in the congested center of the city causes restricts access. A better location for this facility would a site nearer to the garment factories at a site with good road access. Since a significant number of the garment factories are located northwest of Dhaka, the plan to establish a rail ICD at Tongi should be implemented as soon as possible. A similar facility in the Narayaganj area would not be needed since the knitwear manufacturers use less imported fabric and yarn and are more likely to use road transport, which is both faster and cheaper. While the Dhaka rail ICD serves traders supplying imports to the consumers in Dhaka, it is unclear whether this facility should remain open given the increasing congestion and the potential value of the site if used for commercial purposes.

 

Truck ICD (Private ICD)

At present there are 18 Private ICDs in Chattogram (Ctg) area, which are functioning very smoothly with the assistance of CPA, Customs and other concerned authorities. List of ICDs are as follows:

Sl

Name of Off-dock

Location

Phone No.

1

Esack Brothers Industries Ltd

Middle Halishahar, Bandar, Chattogram

720133-4, 25122720-6

3

Ctg Container Transportation Co Ltd

Middle Halishahar (Near Port Stadium), Ctg

710721, 611351

4

K&T Logistics Ltd

CEPZ, Chattogram

742147, 742148, 742103

5

QNS Container Services Ltd

Sector 6A, CEPZ, Chattogram

720393, 740549, 801461-6

6

Summit Alliance Port Ltd (North)

Kathgor, North Patenga, Chattogram

800104-6, 740487, 742199

7

Vertex Off-dock Logistic Services Ltd

Kathgor, North Patenga, Chattogram

2514290-1

8

Shafi Motors Ltd

Fauzderhat, Sagorika Avenue, Chattogram

724252, 2770162-3

9

Port Link Logistics Centre Ltd

Bhatiary, Chattogram

713157, 717768, 723124

10

Summit Alliance Port Ltd (East)

Kathgor, North Patenga, Chattogram

800104-6, 740487, 742199

11

Summit Alliance Port Ltd (West)

Kathgor, North Patenga, Chattogram

800104-6, 740487, 742199

12

KDS Logistics Ltd

Ghoramara, Sonaichari, Sitakunda, Ctg

713301, 713302

13

Incontrade Ltd

Laldiar Char, East Patenga, Chattogram

 800233-5, 800193

14

Golden Containers Ltd

North Kattali, Pahartali, City Gate, Ctg

751172

15

BM Container Depot Ltd

Keshalpur, Sitakunda, Chattogram

2780930; 2780932

16

Eastern Logistics Ltd

Katgor, North Patenga, Chattogram

2503341-4

17

Haji Saber Ahmed Timer Co Ltd

Kalurghat Industrial Area, Chattogram

18

Nemsan Container Ltd

Uttor Sonaichori, Kumira, Sitakunda, Ctg


Common-user bonded warehouse

Customs currently authorizes the operation of the bonded facilities in a. Chattogram Port, b. Benapole land port, c. Export Processing Zones, d. Dhaka Rail ICD, and e. Factories producing exclusively for export.

What is missing from this collection are privately managed, common-user bonded warehouses for the storage of imported raw materials. Most export manufacturers have bonded production facilities, but relatively few have been willing to bear the risk of maintaining a large inventory of fabric in order to reduce their order cycle time for future orders. It is left to the traders and suppliers to perform this task, but they have been reluctant because the dysfunctional duty drawback system would not make it profitable. TPF45FPT If a customs bonded warehouse is provided for this purpose, then they could import fabric and sell it to factories under a temporary import arrangement. By establishing an inventory from which producers could quickly obtain imported fabric that can then be locally dyed, these warehouses would allow producers to reduce order cycle times by 2-4 weeks and thereby compete more effectively in existing markets. While there is no immediate precedence for this type of warehouse, the systems and procedures developed for handling temporary imports to the EPZs, the Dhaka ICD and the Off-dock container yards can be adapted for a privately operated common-user facility.

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