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Overview

In Peru, there are different types of roads and tracks, which are accompanied by national, international, departmental or regional and regional or rural routes. Each one of them comprises an efficient transfer to Peruvians, it should also be noted that our country has an extensive area of ​​destinations, and that the Ministry of Transport and Communications (MTC) has implemented an important number of roads and routes that connect with the destinations of each conductor.

The growth of roads and routes in Peru has increased in terms of tourism and intercultural customs with the towns, as well as with the most remote wonders that for more than 50 years have been a point of contact with modernity. However, today there is no way to get to know the whole country, so there are many of the paths that connect you to the destination you are looking for.

The road network of Perú comprises more than 70,000 km of roadways, which are organized by three important groups; Longitudinal, penetration and linkage, each of these is useful to conductors, taking into account the city, department and even the country where they wish to travel.

Main Roads of Peru

Longitudinal Roads

PE – 1: Longitudinal de la Costa: Takes a Peruvian part of the Panamericana Carretera, it divides north and south, this is a totally asphalted road that is composed of 2,375.82 kilometres, which cross through the provinces of Tumbes, Piura, Lambayeque, La Libertad, Ancash, Lima, Ica, Arequipa, Moquegua and Tacna.

PE – 3: Longitudinal de la Sierra: Another one of the most important roads in Peru, this is one of the main ones that runs through the most important cities in the region, at the same time that it is divided into north and south, having as a kilometre 0 to La Oroya, with 3,503 km of extension, 84.1% of asphalted and the rest is not paved. This network pases through: Vado Grande, Huancabamba, Cajamarca, Huaraz, Cerro de Pasco, La Oroya, Huancayo, Huancavelica, Huancabamba, Cajamarca, Huaraz, Cerro de Pasco, La Oroya, Huancayo, Ayacucho, Cusco, Juliaca, Puno y Desaguadero .

PE – 5: Longitudinal de la Selva: And finally, this is the road that runs through the jungle of Peru, a route that goes through the warmest and most tropical cities of the country, with 2,676 km in length and that is located in its totality paved, divided into north and south. Thanks to connecting with many visited destinations and with much intercultural connection, this route passes through Bagua, Jaen, Moyobamba, Tarapoto, Tocache, Camisea and Puerto Prado.

Transverse Roads

PE – 22: Carretera Central: Known also as one of the oldest roads in the country, it runs on a single stretch that departs from the road interchange of Santa Anita (km 0 of the PE -1), and the road to La Oroya (km 0 of 1 to PE -3). At a step of 173.66 kilometres, it offers an easy access and transit route that allows you to visit some places near the capital, crossing Ate, Chosica, Matucana, San Mateo, San Mateo and Morococha.

PE – 30: Carretera de San Juan de Marcona – Iñapari: This is the cross-section of the south, a hill that forms part of the Interoceanic Carretera that connects our country with Brazil, with 1,367.62 kilometres of partially paved road, which runs through the departments de Ica, Ayacucho, Apurímac, Cuzco and Madre de Dios.

The national road network is comprised of national interest, which are formed by three longitudinal axles, called with odd numbers. They are also represented by a shield and are coded with the format PE- x the longitudinal and PE- xx the transversals.

The regional road network, remain limited to a single department or region, where they are represented by an emblem and coded with letters corresponding to the department, 3 digits between 100 and 499.

The rural road network the roads in the local environment, where its function is to articulate the district capitals with the populated centers that are based on the norm of roadways, as zone three affirmed. If they are represented with a circuit, the letters corresponding to the department are coded. Three digits between 500 and 999.


Ministerio de Transportes y Comunicaciones

Jiron Zorritos 1203 – Lima 1 - Peru

Página Web: https://www.gob.pe/mtc

Teléfono: +511 6157800


Director General de Caminos y Ferrocarriles

Nombre: Ing. Carlos Eduardo Lozada Contreras

E-mail: clozada@mtc.gob.pe

Teléfono: +511 6157800 - Anexo 1219



Director de Caminos

Nombre: Lic. Luis Escobar Alarcón

E-mail: lescobar@mtc.gob.pe

Teléfono: +511 6157800 - Anexo 1316

 

For more information on government contact details, please see the following link: 4.1 Government Contact List.

Distance Matrix

Distances from Capital City to Major Towns (km)


Lima

Tumbes

Piura

Cajamarca

Arequipa

Cuzco

Tacna

Puno

Lima


1299

973

856

997

1153

1293

1542

Tumbes

1299


283

750

2265

2362

2549

2591

Piura

973

283


496

1982

2079

2266

2515

Cajamarca

856

750

496


1860

1957

2144

2186

Arequipa 

997

2265

1982

1860


515

284

326

Cuzco

1153

2362

2079

1957

515


799

389

Tacna 

1293

2549

2266

2144

284

799


610

Puno

1542

2591

2515

2186

326

389

610


Travel Time from Capital City to Major Towns (in Hours)


Lima

Tumbes

Piura

Cajamarca

Arequipa

Cuzco

Tacna

Puno

Lima


21.7

17.0

15.0

16.0

19.0

18.0

20.0

Tumbes

21.7


5.0

14.0

37.0

40.0

39.0

42.0

Piura 

17.0

5.0


9.0

31.0

35.0

34.0

36.0

Cajamarca 

15.0

14.0

9.0


30.0

34.0

33.0

35.0

Arequipa 

16.0

37.0

31.0

30.0


9.0

5.0

5.0

Cuzco

19.0

40.0

35.0

34.0

9.0


14.0

7.0

Tacna

18.0

39.0

34.0

33.0

5.0

14.0


7.0

Puno

20.0

42.0

36.0

35.0

5.0

7.0

7.0


Road Security

Known as Devil Curve in Peru they are called this way to the areas of highways and roads that are on a curve that is too narrow, which can be at the foot of a slope, which is equivalent to the curve of death in many other countries. According to information from the Highway Police, the Ministry of Transport and Communications, to prevent there are many risks for drivers, and it is for this reason reports on the most dangerous roads in Peru:

Villa El Salvador. (Local Highway), Santiago de Chocorvos. (Local Highway), Pasamayo (National Route PE-1), Arequipa (Interoceanic Route Brazil - Peru), Puno (Interoceanic Route Brazil - Peru), Jauja (National Route PE-22) and Iquitos (Departmental Route LO-104). 

Weighbridges and Axle Load Limits

 The Bridges inventory conditions in the National Road Network as of 2019 report of the Ministry of Transport and Communications are as follows:

 Technical Note:

-Adequate Definitive Bridge: With load design according to current traffic requirements (48 Ton.)

-Final Bridge Not Adequate: With a load design prior to current traffic requirements (<48 Ton.) And more than 30 years old

-Adequate Modular Bridge: Modern and state-of-the-art structure -Non-Adequate Modular Bridge: Old structure that does not comply with current regulations

-Artisan Bridge and others: Provisional structure made of wood, poles, stock of rails and others that are inappropriate for safety and current traffic.

Type of Bridge

Good Condition

Bad Condition

Total

Permanent

658

591

1,249

Modular

701

290

991

Others


1.196

1,196

Total

1.359

2.077

3,436

Axle Load Limits

Peru

Bolivia

Chile

Truck with 2 Axles

Vehicle Configuration: C2

Gross Weight: 18 Tons

1st Axis: 7 Tons

2nd Axis :11 Tons

Vehicle Configuration: 1RS-1RS

Gross Weight: 14 Tons

1st Axis: 7 Tons

2nd Axis: 7 Tons

Vehicle Configuration: Simple + Doble

Gross Weight: 11 Tons

1st Axis: 7 Tons

2nd Axis: 4 Tons

Truck with 3 Axles

Vehicle Configuration: C3

Gross Weight: 25 Tons

1st Axis: 7 Tons

2nd Axis: 9 Tons

3rd Axis: 9 Tons

Vehicle Configuration: 1RS-1RS-1RS

Gross Weight: 21 Tons

1st Axis: 7 Tons

2nd Axis: 7 Tons

3rd Axis: 7 Tons

Vehicle Configuration: Triple Simple

Gross Weight: 19 Tons

1st Axis: 7 Tons

2nd Axis: 7 Tons

3rd Axis: 5 Tons

Truck with 4 Axles

Vehicle Configuration: C4

Gross Weight: 30 Tons

1st Axis: 7 Tons

2nd, 3rd, and 4th Axis Total: 23 Tons

Vehicle Configuration: 1RS-1RD

Gross Weight: 18 Tons

1st Axis: 7 Tons

2nd Axis: 11 Tons

Vehicle Configuration: Doble + Doble

Gross Weight: 18 Tons

1st Axis: 7 Tons

2nd Axis 11 Tons

Semi-trailer with 3 Axles

Vehicle Configuration: T2S1

Gross Weight: 29 Tons

1st Axis: 7 Tons

2nd Axis: 11 Tons

3rd Axis: 11 Tons

Vehicle Configuration: 1RS-1RD-1RS-1RS

Gross Weight: 32 Tons

1st Axis: 7 Tons

2nd Axis: 11 Tons

3rd Axis: 7 Tons

4th Axis: 7 Tons

Vehicle Configuration: Triple + Doble

Gross Weight: 25 Tons

1st Axis: 7 Tons

2nd Axis: 7 Tons

3rd Axis: 7 Tons

4thAxis: 4 Tons

Semi-trailer with 4 Axles

Vehicle Configuration: T2S2

Gross Weight: 36 Tons

1st Axis: 7 Tons

2nd Axis: 11 Tons

3rd Axis: 9 Tons

4th Axis: 9 Tons

Vehicle Configuration: 1RS-1RD-1RD-1RD

Gross Weight: 40 Tons

1st Axis: 7 Tons

2nd Axis: 11 Tons

3rd Axis: 11 Tons

4th Axis: 11 Tons 

Vehicle Configuration: Simple + Doble + Doble + Doble

Gross Weight: 39 Tons

1st Axis: 7 Tons

2nd Axis: 11 Tons

3rd Axis: 11 Tons

4th Axis: 10 Tons

Semi-trailer with 5 Axles

Vehicle Configuration: T2S3

Gross Weight: 43 Tons

1st Axis: 7 Tons

2nd Axis: 11 Tons

3rd, 4th, and 5th Total: 25 Tons

Vehicle Configuration: 1RS-1RD-1RD-1RS1RD

Gross Weight: 43 Tons

1st Axis: 7 Tons

2nd Axis: 11 Tons

3rd Axis: 11 Tons

4th Axis: 14 Tons

Vehicle Configuration: 1Simple-1Doble-1Doble-1Simple+1Doble

Gross Weight: 42 Tons

1st Axis: 7 Tons

2nd Axis: 11 Tons

3rd Axis: 11 Tons

4th Axis: 13 Tons

Semi-trailer with 6 Axles

Vehicle Configuration: T3S3

Gross Weight: 48 Tons

1st Axis: 7 Tons

2nd Axis: 9 Tons

3rd Axis: 9 Tons

4th, 5th,and 6th Total: 23 Tons

Vehicle Configuration: 1RS-1RD-1RD-2RD

Gross Weight: 45 Tons

1st Axis: 7 Tons

2nd Axis: 11 Tons

3rd Axis: 11 Tons

4th Axis: 18 Tons

Vehicle Configuration: 1Simple-1Doble-1Doble-2Dobles

Gross Weight: 45 Tons

1st Axis: 7 Tons

2nd Axis: 11 Tons

3rd Axis: 11 Tons

4th Axis: 18 Tons

Truck & Drawbar Trailer with 4 Axles

Vehicle Configuration: C2R2

Gross Weight: 40 Tons

1st Axis: 7 Tons

2nd Axis: 11 Tons

3rd Axis: 11 Tons

4th Axis: 11 Tons

N/AN/A

Truck & Drawbar Trailer with 5 Axles

Vehicle Configuration: C3R2

Gross Weight: 47 Tons

1st Axis: 7 Tons

2nd Axis: 9 Tons

3rd Axis: 9 Tons

4th Axis: 11 Tons

5th Axis: 11 Tons

N/AN/A

Truck & Drawbar Trailer with 6 Axles

Vehicle Configuration: C3R3

Gross Weight: 48 Tons

1st Axis: 7 Tons

2nd Axis: 9 Tons

3rd Axis: 9 Tons

4th Axis: 11 Tons

5th Axis: 6 Tons

6th Axis: 6 Tons

N/AN/A

Truck & Drawbar Trailer with 7 Axles

Vehicle Configuration: C3R4

Gross Weight: 48 Tons

1st Axis: 7 Tons

2nd Axis: 9 Tons

3rd Axis: 9 Tons

4th Axis: 11 Tons

5th, 6th,and 7th Total: 12 Tons

N/AN/A

 

National Road Network

The National Road Network, are the highways of national interest formed by three main longitudinal axes, named with odd numbers. They are three longitudinal axes and have the following composition:

1.) PE-1 Longitudinal de la Costa, is the Pan-American Highway in Peru, with an extension of 2,364 kilometres, it is divided into:

- PE-1N North Pan-American Highway

- PE-1S Carretera Panamericana Sur

2.) PE-3 Longitudinal de la Sierra, with an extension of 3,503 kilometers, is divide into:

- PE-3N Longitudinal de la Sierra Norte

- PE-3S Longitudinal de la Sierra Sur

3.) PE-5 Longitudinal de la Selva, is the Carretera Marginal de la Selva, with an extension of 1.809 kilometers, it is divided into:

- PE-5N Longitudinal de la Selva Norte

- PE-5S Longitudinal de la Selva Sur

The three longitudinal axes have an additional extension of variants and branches of 9,692 kilometres.

There are 20 of Transversal Highways, joining two or more departments or regions, coded with even numbers:

PE-02, PE-02A, PE-02B, PE-04, PE-04A, PE-04B, PE-04C, PE-06, PE-06A, PE-06B, PE-08, PE-08A, PE- 08B, PE-08C, PE-10, PE-10A, PE-10B, PE-10C, PE-14, PE-14A, PE-14B, PE-14C, PE-16, PE-18, PE-18A, PE-18B, PE-18C, PE-20, PE-20A, PE-20B, PE-20C, PE-22, PE-22A, PE-22B, PE-24, PE-24A, PE-26, PE- 26A, PE-26B, PE-28, PE-28A, PE-28B, PE-28C, PE-28D, PE-28E, PE-28F, PE-28G, PE-30, PE-30A, PE-30B, PE-30C, PE-32, PE-32A, PE-34, PE-34A, PE-34B, PE-34C, PE-34D, PE-34E, PE-34F, PE-34G, PE-34H, PE- 34I, PE-34J, PE-36, PE-36A, PE-36B, PE-36C, PE-38, PE-38A, PE-40 and PE-40A.

 

Road Class and Surface Conditions

Road Maps by National Routes: https://portal.mtc.gob.pe/transportes/caminos/normas_carreteras/mapa-ruta-nacional.html

 

Classification of Roads in Peru:

International Road Network

PAN – Panamerican Highway

INO – Interoceanic Highway

CMS – Marginal Jungle Highway

National Road Network

PE – 1: Longitudinal de la Costa. PE – 1N: Carretera Panamericana Norte. PE – 1S: Carretera Panamericana Sur.

PE – 3 Longitudinal de la Sierra. PE – 3N: Longitudinal de la Sierra Norte. PE – 3S: Longitudinal de la Sierra Sur.

PE – 5: Longitudinal de la Selva – Carretera Marginal de la Selva. PE – 5N: Longitudinal de la Selva Norte. PE – 5S: Longitudinal de la Selva Sur.

National System of Roads (SINAC), which is in charge of ordering the roadways that form part of this organism, in addition to grouping the three types of road networks, based on their functionality and importance, such as:

  • National Network Road
  • Regional Network Road
  • Rural Network Road

For the National Road System, it is responsible for the permanent management, revision, updating and improvement of the same, as well as implementing the norms and instruments for these activities, in addition to defining and officialising the National Register of Carreteras (RENAC). This remains outside the competent authorities such as the MTC.

 

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