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Roads are the main mode of transport in Algeria. It is estimated that 85% of goods and passengers use road as their primary mode of transport. Road development essentially follows human settlement patterns and the network is much more developed in the northern coastal region where economic activities and population concentrations are heaviest. 
The south is served by a limited number of national roads linking the few densely populated areas. Road conditions can be variable, particularly in the south on the trans-Saharan corridor, as even newly paved portions of the road often disappear under immense drifts of sand that block the route for days at a time. The east-west highway project, which is partly under completion at the moment, is vastly changing the highway profile in the country. It is Algeria’s most important road project and is now near completion. The only pending section is a 150-km stretch of highway between Constantine and Skikda. The 1 216-km highway, which runs between Morocco and Tunisia, will connect Algeria’s major coastal cities. Construction of the US$11-billion highway began in 2009, with completion scheduled for the fourth quarter of 2013. However, deadline delays led to urgent calls by the Algerian Government in May 2013 for the Japanese construction consortium, COJAAL, to finish the project as soon as possible. It is considered one of the largest public works projects in the world and it is envisaged that the project will contribute significantly to alleviating the isolation of the eastern and western provinces as well as facilitating better connections with Morocco and Tunisia. The other major axis in the country, the Trans-Saharan Highway, passes through Algeria, Niger and Nigeria. Development has been strong in the north of the country, with the focus on the east-west highway. Future development will, however, focus on the north-south highway in an attempt to realise greater connectivity for the more remotely situated populations in the south.

Algeria Roads

There are 71,656 kilometres of paved roads including 640 kilometres of expressways and 32,344 kilometres of unpaved roads for a total road system of 104,000 kilometres.

For Regional highways, Algeria has two routes in the Trans-African Highway network, including the Trans-Sahara Highway, soon to be complete as a paved road running from north to south through the country. The country has also embarked (as of 2006) in the construction of a new East-West highway

The primary road network to transport food assistance from Oran to Tindouf further to Rabouni (around 1675 Km) is 100% asphalt. Large part (around 40%) of this road, goes through mountains tend to meander through steep hills, and gets fairly narrow with several relatively small bridges to cross up to Bechar (a city around 800 Km from Tindouf.

The road is reasonably good, however, it’s subject sometimes to be blocked, due to the damages caused by floods as a result of heavy rain, especially from January to March, however, the government usually act promptly to repair the damages. The maximum load of trucks is from 20 to 25 MT

The EDP, is located at Rabouni, which is 25 Km from Tindouf, and all trucks, must arrives first to Tindouf, complete authorization paper work to enter the camps, and then continues up to Rabouni.

Distance Matrix

Road Security

Security: Good, well secured with several check points on the road.

Military and police checkpoints are commonplace on major roads within large cities and throughout the countryside. Reports state that Algeria has the fourth-highest vehicular accident rate in the world and the highest in both the Maghreb and Arab world. The nationwide average for vehicular deaths annually is about 1,000 and for vehicular injuries is about 10,000. The Algerian government has implemented stricter conditions for licensing vehicles and has introduced the following new measures: withdrawing older vehicles from circulation, reducing the on-road hours for public service vehicle drivers, and barring heavy transport vehicles in Algiers during daylight hours. It is hoped that these measures will improve road safety conditions. 

Weighbridges and Axle Load Limits

Axle load limits

Algeria

Tunisia

Morocco

Truck with 2 axles

 17 MT

17 MT

17 MT

Truck with 3 axles

27 MT

26.5 MT

26 MT

Truck with 4 axles

45 MT

44 MT

40 MT

Semi-trailer with 3 axles

27 MT

26.5 MT

26 MT

Semi-trailer with 4 axles

45 MT

44 MT

40 MT

Semi-trailer with 5 axles

45 MT

44 MT

40 MT

Semi-trailer with 6 axles

45 MT

44 MT

40 MT

Truck & drawbar trailer with 4 axles

45 MT

44 MT

40 MT

Truck & drawbar trailer with 5 axles

45 MT

44 MT

40 MT

Truck & drawbar trailer with 6 axles

45 MT

44 MT

40 MT

Truck & drawbar trailer with 7 axles

45 MT

44 MT

40 MT