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Aceh and Northern Sumatra Humanitarian Background

Disasters, Conflicts and Migration

Natural Disasters

Yes / No

Comments / Details

Drought

Yes

Districts in the lowlands of Aceh province have previously experienced droughts, as recently as in 2005 and 2008.

Earthquakes

Yes

All districts and cities throughout Aceh province were experienced the earthquakes, especially for the districts and cities located in the west coast of Aceh.

Epidemics

Yes

Several districts and cities located in the lowlands of Aceh have experienced an epidemic of Dengue fever in 1992 and 2005.

Extreme Temperatures

Yes

 

Flooding

Yes

Several districts and cities located in the lowlands of Aceh are prone to flooding.

Insect Infestation

No

 

Mudslides

Yes

Several districts located in the mountains of Aceh are prone to landslides especially with the impact of heavy rains or flood.

Volcanic Eruptions

Yes

As recently as February 2014 with the eruption of Mount Sinabung, there have been volcanic eruptions which have caused a loss of life and damage to property.

High Waves / Surges

Yes

All districts and cities located in the west coast of Aceh and some districts and cities located in the east coast of Aceh have experienced hit by tsunami that triggered from mega earthquake such as Indian Ocean tsunami in 2004.

Simeulue and Banyak islands face the greatest potential risk for tsunami in Aceh province.

Wildfires

Yes

Several districts located in the lowlands of Aceh province have experienced forest fires including in Aceh Timur in 2009 and Aceh Besar in 2011.

High Winds

Yes

All districts located in the coastal areas have experienced wind storms. The latest wind storm to hit Aceh province was in 2009.

Other Comments

  

Man-Made Issues

  

Civil Strife

Yes

Aceh province experienced a very long conflict between armed civilians and military for approximately 30 years.   A peace agreement between the Free Aceh Movements (GAM) and the Government of Indonesia was signed in 2006.

International Conflict

No

 

Internally Displaced Persons

No

 

Refugees Present

No

 

Landmines / UXO Present

No

 

Other Comments

  

For more detailed database on disasters by country, please see the Centre for Research on Epidemiology of Disasters:

EMDAT information for Indonesia

Calamities and Seasonal Affects

 

Seasonal Effects on Transport

Transport

Comments

From (month) to (month)

Primary Road Transport

Most of the logistics bottlenecks in primary roads are due to road and bridge maintenance.

Natural disasters, including heavy rain, floods, landslides, etc. can have an impact on the road network.

Congestion and lack of resources occurs during Eid festival at the end of Ramadan

All year round.

 

Likely during rainy season September to April.

 

1-2 weeks before and after Eid festival (Hijriah calendar).

Secondary Road Transport

Most of logistics bottlenecks in primary roads are due to road and bridge maintenance.

Natural disasters, including heavy rain, floods, landslides, etc. can have an impact on the road network.

All year round.

 

Likely during rainy season September to April.

Rail Transport

Natural disasters, including heavy rain, floods, landslides, etc. can have an impact on the rail network.

October - April

Air Transport

Bottlenecks during Eid and Hajj festivals.

 

 

Poor weather conditions in rainy season.

1-2 weeks before and after Eid festival (Hijriah calendar).

 

Likely during rainy season September to April.

Waterway Transport

  

 

Seasonal Effects on Storage and Handling (economic, social, climate…)

Activity

Comments

From <month> to <month>

Storage

Ramadan, Eid and Haj festivals period is a peak of activity, trade and trips; this may lead to congestions, increase in handling, transport and storage costs, with difficulties in securing labourers.

1-2 weeks before and after Eid festival and 1 week around Hajj festival (Hijriah calendar).

Handling

Ramadan, Eid and Haj festivals period is a peak of activity, trade and trips; this may lead to congestions, increase in handling, transport and storage costs, with difficulties in securing labourers.

1-2 weeks before and after Eid festival and 1 week around Hajj festival (Hijriah calendar).

Other

  


 

Capacity and Contacts for In-Country Emergency Response

Government

The Badan Nasional Penanggulangan Bencana (BNPB) was created and has the functions of coordinator and commander during emergency responses. BNPB is supported by ministers and other government authorities, meanwhile at local level it is supported by BPBD (Provincial Disaster Management Agency) and local government. Currently all BPBD Offices have been established in 33 provinces within Indonesia. National Disaster Management Agency (BNPB) is a non-department governmental agency headed by a ministerial-level official. This institution is directly responsible to the President of Indonesia.

All BPBD offices in Aceh province are headed by District/City Secretary (Sekda) and under coordination of Aceh Disaster Management Agency (BPBA). Currently all districts and cities in Aceh province have established the Disaster Management Agency (BPBD) offices.
The main roles of BPBDs in Aceh province are:

  • To inform and coordinate with BPBA on any disasters happen at the region.
  • To respond on disasters happened at the region in close coordination with all local government institutions involved on disaster management.

The provincial locations of the BPBD in Aceh, Nias Island and Medan are :

Banda Aceh
Sabang
Aceh Basar
Pidie
Pidie Jaya
Bireuen
Lhokseumawe
Aceh Ulatra
Aceh Timur
Langsa
Aceh Tamiang
Gayo Lues
Aceh Tenggara
Aceh Jaya
Aceh Barat
Nagan Raya
Aceh Barat Daya
Aceh Selatan
Simeulue
Subulussalam
Aceh Singkil
Bener Meriah
Aceh Tengah
Gunung Sitoli
Nias
Nias Selatan
Medan

Humanitarian Community

The activities of the humanitarian community in the Aceh province generally focussed on the recovery and reconstruction post the tsunami and earthquake of 2004.  In addition there is also active programmes in relation to the emergency response for the Mount Sinabung eruption of 2014.

For information on Indonesia humanitarian contact details, please see the following link: