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Disasters, Conflicts and Migration

Natural Disasters

Yes / No

Comments / Details

Drought

Yes

Recurrent drought in the north severely affects agricultural activities.

Earthquakes

Yes

Between 1964 and 2015 various minor tremors shook Ghana. The effects of two tremors that occurred in 1997 were felt in all the regions.

Epidemics

Yes

Cholera, Yellow Fever, Cerebro-Spinal Meningitis (CSM), Pandemic Influenza, etc.

Extreme Temperatures

Yes

Average maximum temperatures are highest in March over the entire country with the exception of an area between Akuse, Ho and Tafo where temperatures are highest in February. The highest temperature so far recorded in Ghana is 43.9H°C at Navrongo.

Flooding

Yes

In 2010, floods in the White Volta River Basin affected hundreds of thousands of people and destroyed many of their livelihoods.

Insect Infestation

Yes

Armyworm, Anthrax, Blackfly, Locust, Larger Grain Borer, etc.

Mudslides

Yes

Mud slides are a common risk in the wetter Western and Eastern regions of Ghana.

Volcanic Eruptions

No

N/A

High Waves / Surges

Yes

The Volta Region of Ghana experiences incidences of inundation of settlements and road networks by tidal waves. The country has a coastline of about 539 km which makes it vulnerable to the impacts of climate change, particularly sea level rise and coastal erosion.

Wildfires

Yes

Fire is a major hazard in Ghana. Incidences of widespread bushfires mostly affect the Northern and Brong Ahafo regions annually and are attributed to the burning of land in preparation for cultivation and the dry spell experienced as a result of the Hamattan season.

High Winds

Yes

Windstorms usually accompany the early rains in Ghana and are major causes of destruction of property and infrastructure. The dry, dusty, harmattan winds occur from January to March

Man-Made Issues

Yes / No

Comments / Details

  

Civil Strife

Yes

Land conflicts were mostly inter-ethnic struggles over access to, control over and ownership of land.

International Conflict

No

N/A

Internally Displaced Persons

No

N/A

Refugees Present

Yes

Around 14,000 refugees, mainly from Ivory Coast and Togo

Landmines / UXO Present

No

N/A

 

For more detailed database on disasters by country, please see the Centre for Research on Epidemiology of Disasters website.

Calamities and Seasonal Affects

Seasonal Affects on Transport

Transport

Comments

From (month) to (month)

Primary Road Transport

No

N/A

Secondary Road Transport

Yes

From April to July

Rail Transport

No

N/A

Air Transport

Yes, due to the Harmattan winds

From December to March

Waterway Transport

N/A

N/A


The major primary roads are paved and in good condition, as opposed to the secondary roads which are not paved and can be damaged during the rainy season. The harmattan winds greatly affect air transport with delays and cancellation of certain flights due to low visibility.  

 

Seasonal Affects on Storage and Handling (economic, social, climate…)

Activity

Comments

From <month> to <month>

Storage

No

N/A

Handling

No

N/A

Capacity and Contacts for In-Country Emergency Response

Government

In response to the Yokohama strategy for a safer world and plan of action, the National Disaster Management Organization (NADMO) was established by Act 517 of 1996 to manage disasters and similar emergencies in the country. It was structured and placed under the ministry of the interior, to enable it to coordinate all the relevant civil authorities at the national, regional and district levels.

NADMO functions under a National secretariat, 10 Regional secretariats, 243 Metropolitan, Municipal and District secretariats and over 900 Zonal offices throughout the country. The Technical Advisory Committees are the multi-sectorial and multi-discipline bodies that do the technical planning and advise NADMO on the mode of implementation of programmes and projects appropriate for the various hazard/ disasters types. They play very active roles in the pre-disaster, emergency and post-disaster phases either as technical advisers or field workers.

The Technical Committee members are drawn from the Ministries, Departments and Agencies (MDAs), UN system, Professional Institutions/Academia and individuals with the requisite skills, expertise and proven experience.

The Technical Committees at all meetings discuss topical issues affecting or likely to affect the people of Ghana during emergencies and in a relative peace time they are expected to assist NADMO in the implementation of programmes and projects. With the diverse expertise embedded in the committees, the members are occasionally used as resource persons for workshops, seminars, media education and outreach programmes.

There are eight National Technical Committees of experts from governmental, non- governmental and other institutions. The Nuclear and Radiological Committee was recently added because of its international specific concerns and focus.  

For information on Ghana Government contact details, please see the following link: 4.1 Ghana Government Contact List

Humanitarian Community

26 UN entities are active in Ghana:  FAO, IAEA, IFAD, IFC, ILO, IMF, IMO, IOM, UNAIDS, UNDP, UNDSS, UNEP, UNESCO, UNFPA, UNHCR, UNIC, UNICEF, UNIDO, UNODC, UNU-INRA, UN Habitat, UN Volunteers, UN Women, WFP, WHO, World Bank.

The UN has four programme areas for the period 2012-2016 which are fully aligned with the Ghana Shared Growth and Development Agenda (GSGDA) and the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs):

  1. Food Security and Nutrition 
  2. Sustainable Environment, Energy and Human Settlements
  3. Human Development and Productive Capacity for Improved Social Services
  4. Transparent and Accountable Governance  

The UN is organized in 11 Outcome Groups that are linked to the national Sector Working Groups. See the United Nations in Ghana website for more information. 

Ghana hosts one of six United Nations Humanitarian Response Depots (HRDs) in the world. The depot stores emergency supplies and equipment not just for WFP—which manages the depot—but also for other humanitarian organizations who have registered to use the facility. Since its establishment in Ghana in 2006, the depot has helped to reduce costs and improve emergency response time. Dispatches have been used to respond to several emergency operations in Africa, and have reached as far as Haiti. A Logistics Intervention Fleet has also been integrated into the activities of the HRD, with the objective of further improving the region’s response capacity and eliminating the need for capital investments each time an emergency occurs.  

For information on humanitarian organization contact details, please see the following link: 4.2 Ghana Humanitarian Agency Contact List