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Disasters, Conflicts and Migration

Natural Disasters

Type

Occurs

Comments / Details

Drought

NO

 

Earthquakes

NO

 

Epidemics

NO

 

Extreme Temperatures

NO

 

Flooding

YES

Hurricane Earl (Belize City)

Insect Infestation

NO

 

Mudslides

NO

 

Volcanic Eruptions

NO

 

High Waves / Surges

NO

 

Wildfires

YES

in the West of the country (69 dead people)

High Winds

NO

 

Other Comments

 

Man-Made Issues

Civil Strife

NO

 

International Conflict

NO

 

Internally Displaced Persons

NO

 

Refugees Present

NO

 

Landmines / UXO Present

NO

 

Other Comments

 

For a more detailed database on disasters by country, please see the 

Seasonal Effects on Logistics Capacities

Seasonal Effects on Transport

Transport Type

Time Frame

Comments / Details

Primary Road Transport

All Year

 

Secondary Road Transport

All Year

 

Rail Transport

N/A

 

Air Transport

All Year

 

Waterway Transport

All Year

 

The hurricane season normally starts on 1 June and ends on 30 November, though this varies by region - it begins in early May in Toledo and early June in Corozal. Historically, most hurricanes occur between August and October in Belize. Hurricanes form over a period of several days and even weeks. The path of the storm is tracked and predicted using the latest technology, which enables the areas to be affected ample time to prepare for the storm. Thanks to NEMO (National Emergency Management Organization), Belize has a thorough emergency plan ready to be enacted in the event of a hurricane.

 

Seasonal Effects on Storage and Handling

Activity Type

Time Frame

Comments / Details

Storage

All Year

 

Handling

All Year

 

Other

  

It is difficult to predict how the storage and handling services will be affected by changes in weather patterns due to the reality of climate change. Not only have we seen a marked difference in the length of wet and dry seasons and when they occured during the year, but also we are noticing a more extreme weather behaviour in terms of flooding and drought with difficult to predict long term-effects of increasing average temperatures. 

The rainy season is determined by the first time after the 1st of May in when there is more than an inch of rainfall in seven days with at least four days receiving some rainfall. The southern region has the most rainfall with a mean of 160 inches (4064 mm) per year; July is by far the wettest month there. In the central region are primary and secondary maxima occurring in June and September. Each of these is significantly less than the single maximum for the south. Data for the northern region show that rainfall is usually much less than the other regions; the annual mean there is only 60 inches (152 mm).

Capacity and Contacts for In-Country Emergency Response

Government

NEMO in cooperation with the respective Emergency Management Committees, and all Public and Private Agencies, is established to preserve life and property throughout the country of Belize in the event of an emergency and to mitigate the impact on the country and its people. The composition of NEMO comprises the Cabinet, with the Prime Minister as the Chairperson, the Cabinet Secretary, as Secretary, the NEMO Secretariat and the 13 Operational Committees (chaired by Permanent Secretaries).

The thirteen Operational Committees are as follows: Education, Communication and Warning, Medical & Public Health, Housing and Shelter, Search & Rescue, Economic & Recovery, Damage Assessment & Needs Analysis, Foreign Assistance, Transport & Evacuation, Environment & Utilities, Human Resources Management, Relief & Supplies Management, Restoration of Utilities and Mitigation, Access & Infrastructure. The other permanent members are the Belize Red Cross, the Belize Teachers Union, the Chief Meteorological Officer, the Commandant BDF and the Commissioner of Police. Integral to NEMO are its 9 District Emergency Committees (chaired by the senior Minister in each District) representing Belize, Corozal, Orange Walk, Cayo, Stann Creek, Toledo, Belmopan, San Pedro and Caye Caulker.

For more information on government contact details, please see the following link: 4.1 Belize Government Contact List

Humanitarian Community 

Listed below are the main humanitarian agencies conducting activities in Belize as well as their main projects.

Belize Red Cross

Belize Red Cross works within the International Red Cross Federation's Strategy 2020, which aims to save lives and strengthen recovery from disasters, and crises, enable safer and healthy living, and make better provision for marginalized people, promote social inclusion and contribute towards peace. Through its Disaster Management work, BRC employs its Community Disaster Response Teams to work with the National Emergency Management Operation (NEMO) and National Intervention Teams. In addition, BRC identifies and implements new approaches to community involvement in disaster management in community-based health first aid. It also has courses and training on prevention with respect to communicable diseases. As auxiliary to the Government of Belize in all humanitarian aspects, the Belize Red Cross fills the gaps in the National Systems and Action Plans.

BERT Belize Emergency Response Team

Belize Emergency Response Team (BERT) is a non-profit, non-governmental organization. BERT specializes in pre-hospital care in the form of emergency response and transportation. It is the only qualified provider in the country.

Pickstock Development Association

The Association was formed in 2008 to bring the community together to address crime, poverty and underdevelopment. The work is divided in three categories. Firstly, it owns and manages The Samuel Haynes Institute of Excellence. This Institute was established because of the community's desire for a safe space for their children to play, learn and catch up with their peers in education and development. Secondly, the Association engages the community in a deliberate process of consultation on development issues including priority social and infrastructural interventions, many of which have already brought some immediate relief to the neediest in the community. Thirdly, the Association provides opportunities for those in the community most at risk to engage in entrepreneurial, health and nutrition activities in an effort to improve their standards of living.

Bandage International

Bandage International is a group of emergency medicine professionals: paramedics, nurses and doctors, committed to teaching emergency health responders in developing countries. Their mission is to improve safety by guaranteeing primary emergency medical care. Current projects involve the improvementof the training of layperson first responders and professional emergency medical caregivers to improve the safety of the people.

 

For more information on humanitarian agency contact details, please see the following link: 4.2 Belize Humanitarian Agency Contact List

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